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Indepth descriptions of the various ComicSetter functions appear in the Tutorial and following sections of this manual. We recommend that all ComicSetter owners, even experienced Amiga users, read these sections of the manual so they can learn to use ComicSetter to its fullest potential. You should have ComicSetter running on your Amiga while you read this manual, so you can practice the various ComicSetter functions as they are described. Tour if the ConicSetter Screen The ComicSetter screen (which you should have visible on the Amiga monitor in front of you) consists of a large window for showing a part of a page, surrounded by a variety of menus, tools and gadgets. Title Bar At the top of the screen is the “title” bar, showing the name and version of the program. To the right of this, ComicSetter displays the current “document name.” Initially, this should read Untitled 1. To the right of the document name is a “coordinate position indicator”. This shows you the current x y (horizontal vertical) position of your pointer in relation to the top left-hand comer of the page (once the page is created). By default, the units of measure are in inches, but can be changed to display in pixels or centimetres. Finally, at the far right side of the title bar are the standard Amiga “screen-to-front screen-to-back gadgets”. Clicking on these gadgets will let you toggle back and forth from ComicSetter to the Workbench screen, as described in your Amiga user’s guide.

Click image to download PDF

Document sans nom CREATE YOUR OWN COLOUR COMIC BOOKS!
YOURS WITH AMIGA JAN '95 LL Cl OU CdlOZ t WOW!
WORP BALLOOW ILLER COM C FONTS!
W jT PUTS THE POWER OF TH£ PROS 4-r m2UR I Welcome to the full ComicSetter manual, free with the January 1995 issue of CU AMIGA. Over the years Gold Disk’s ComicSetter has impressed many people with its easy to use interface and uncomplicated theory. Anyone, from a complete beginner to a seasoned DTP veteran can produce high quality Christmas, birthday or other occasion cards, party invitations and, of course, comics. All you need are ideas, a sense of humour and an Amiga. You, your friends and family should get years of enjoyment from this program.
The ComicSetter manual not only contains instructions, tutorials and commands, it also provides a rough guide and hints and tips on creating good-looking comics and a glossary of the standard clip art available for the program.
• J All products mentioned in this manual are trademarks of their
respective owners.
©1988 Gold Disk Inc. Licenced to EMAP Images Ltd. For exclusive use on the January 1995 issue of CU AMIGA magazine.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied or distributed, transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any human or computer language, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, manual, or otherwise, or disclosed to third parties without the written permission of Gold Disk.
The layout and design of this version of the Comic Setter manual ©1994 CU AMIGA, EMAP Images Ltd. All of the above conditions apply.
Gold Disk Inc.
P. O. Box 789, Streetsville Mississauga, Ontario Canada L5M 2C2
cotoPYete tVve * TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Getting Started ..11
2. Overview ..15
3.
Tutorial ....21
4. Documents 33
5.
Pages 35
6.
Panels ......37
7.
Grids .41
B. Graphics ...43
9. Bitmap Graphics 51
10. Structured Graphics 59
11.
Text ..95
12.
Balloons ...69
13. Cell Edit 9perations .73
14.
Groups ......77
15. Preferences .....79
16.
Printing ....91
17. Comic Hints ......35
18. Appendices 91
19.
Glossary ..121
29.
Index ......125
GETTING STA System Requireraeats Computer: ComicSetter is
designed to work on any properly configured Amiga.
Operating System: Kickstart 1.2 or higher. Workbench 1.3 or higher.
Memory Requirements: A minimum of 1 Megabyte of memory is required.
Display Monitor: Any Amiga compatible monitor. If working in high resolution mode, a long persistence monitor is ideal. Flicker-reducing, tinted screens are also available for standard Amiga monitors.
Disk Drives: One Amiga 3.5” floppy disk drive is required.
Output Device: ComicSetter outputs to all Preferences printers Conmtiaas laei ii This Maaaal The ComicSetter manual and the software it describes follow the standard Amiga user interface. It is assumed that you have some familiarity with basic Amiga procedures. However, as a refresher, we recommend that you read the following conventions adhered to throughout this manual.
• Bullets (•) indicate related information, lists, or sequences.
• The use of Amiga hierarchy of terms for pull down menus. Main
menus are called “menus”, options in a menu are called “items”,
and options in sub-menus are called “sub-items”.
The terms “requesters”, “gadgets”, and “tools” are also used.
• Italic type is used for words or phrases referring to specific
ComicSetter menus, requesters, and tools. Some examples: the
Project menu, File requester, Panel Create tool.
• Menu selections are often listed in this manual using the
format: Menu Item Sub-item. For example, Text Style Bold refers
to the Bold sub-item in the Style item of the Text menu.
• Keyboard equivalents are graphically depicted in the pull-down
menu displays. Where keyboard equivalents are indicated, the
following notation is used (where “x” is a specific
character):
• Ax- Depress x while holding the RIGHT AMIGA key.
• The COURIER font indicates text that you should type in via the
CLI or in the text line of a requester.
• Moving the mouse pointer to a desired location, pressing and
quickly releasing the left button is called “clicking”. If this
is done in order to activate an object, it is sometimes
referred to as “selecting”.
• Placing the mouse pointer on a desired location, pressing the
left button and holding it down while moving the mouse is
referred to as “dragging”.
Making a Working Copy of ComicSetter We recommend that you do not use the original disks which you received in the ComicSetter package other than to make working copies.
Immediately make one (1) back-up copy of each disk to use as your working disks. Store the original ComicSetter disks in a safe place, retrieving only to make additional replacement copies if your back-up disks are lost or damaged.
For your convenience, ComicSetter is not copy-protected. Please respect the fact that Gold Disk Inc. has made it easy for you to make an authorised back-up to prevent risk to your original copies. Do not sell, lend, give, or otherwise distribute the ComicSetter program to anyone.
Making a Back-up With one drive:
• Refer to the coverdisk pages in CU Amiga to find out how to
make up an uncompressed version of ComicSetter, this will be
your program disk.
• Boot up with the Workbench disk that came with your Amiga. Then
put your ComicSetter Program disk in the drive. Be sure that it
is write-protected.
• Select the ComicSetter disk icon.
• In the Workbench menu, select the Duplicate item, then follow
the instructions the Amiga provides.
With two drives:
• Boot up with the Workbench disk that came with your Amiga.
Place the ComicSetter Program disk in the first drive, and a
blank disk in the second drive. Be sure that the ComicSetter
Program disk is write- protected.
• Move the mouse pointer over the ComicSetter Program disk icon
and “grab” the icon by pressing and holding down the left mouse
button.
• Still holding down the left mouse button, drag the ComicSetter
icon over on top of the icon for the blank disk, and release
the button.
• Your Amiga will provide the necessary instructions to complete
the back-up copy.
• After the Program disk copy is finished, you should rename the
copy of ComicSetter from “Copy of ComicSetter” to
“ComicSetter”.
Repeat the copy process for the ComicSetter clipart on the cover disk.
Starting ComicSetter From the Workbench:
• Insert the ComicSetter Program disk in the drive to boot the
system.
• Double click on the ComicSetter Program disk icon to bring up
the ComicSetter window.
• Double click on the ComicSetter Program icon to start the
program.
OVERVIEW This section of the manual is intended to give you a basic familiarity with the ComicSetter screen and its components in preparation for the Tutorial. Indepth descriptions of the various ComicSetter functions appear in the Tutorial and following sections of this manual. We recommend that all ComicSetter owners, even experienced Amiga users, read these sections of the manual so they can learn to use ComicSetter to its fullest potential. You should have ComicSetter running on your Amiga while you read this manual, so you can practice the various ComicSetter functions as they are
described.
Tour if the ConicSetter Screen The ComicSetter screen (which you should have visible on the Amiga monitor in front of you) consists of a large window for showing a part of a page, surrounded by a variety of menus, tools and gadgets.
Title Bar At the top of the screen is the “title” bar, showing the name and version of the program. To the right of this, ComicSetter displays the current “document name.” Initially, this should read Untitled 1. To the right of the document name is a “coordinate position indicator”. This shows you the current x y (horizontal vertical) position of your pointer in relation to the top left-hand comer of the page (once the page is created).
By default, the units of measure are in inches, but can be changed to display in pixels or centimetres. Finally, at the far right side of the title bar are the standard Amiga “screen-to-front screen-to-back gadgets”.
Clicking on these gadgets will let you toggle back and forth from ComicSetter to the Workbench screen, as described in your Amiga user’s guide.
Menu Bar Hold down the right mouse button to make the “menu” bar visible.
There are seven ComicSetter menus available: Project, Edit, Layout, Text, Alter, Preferences, and Documents. Menus can be pulled down by moving the pointer to any specific menu name while holding down the right mouse button. Pull down the various menus, and look at the different selections available.
Selecting Menus, Items, and Sub-Items Pulling down a menu reveals a number of selections, or “items.” The Project menu, for example, has eleven items to select from. You can select any of these items, by holding the right mouse button down as you move the pointer to the item you want and then releasing the button. Some menu items contain a sub-menu of options or “sub-items”.
For example, you will notice that when you move the pointer to Project Save Bitmap a sub-menu appears showing two sub-items, Panel and Page. To select a sub-item, move the pointer to the one you want, and release the right mouse button. If Panel was the choice, the selection would be indicated in this manual as Project Save Bitmap Panel.
Requesters Some menu items are followed by three periods (for example, Project Open...). The three periods indicate that if you select this item, a “requester” will appear. A requester is a window containing several options that you can choose from. For example, selecting Project Open will call up a familiar-looking Amiga file requester showing you what files are available, and allowing you to load a file into ComicSetter if you wish. You can cancel any requester by clicking on the Cancel! Gadget and returning to the screen.
Tool Palette Running down the left side of the screen is the ComicSetter “tool” palette, which contains all the different drawing modes and tools that you use to create comics. The tool palette consists of the following: nine “general” tools, the “drawing mode” gadget, eight “drawing” tools, a “colour” sub-palette, and a “line width” selector.
General Tools Sub-Palette This part of the tool palette contains nine general tools to help you lay out a page. They are the null pointer, panel create tool, group create tool, hand move, send-to-back tool, send-to-front tool, balloon create tool, text tool, and bitmap create tool.
Null Pointer Panel Create m m m *| Group Create Hand Move
* k «J Send to Back Send to Front Drawing Mode Gadget The drawing
mode gadget is set by default to allow you to draw in “struc
tured drawing” mode. Click on the gadget and the
T-square-and-triangle structured drawing icon is replaced by
a paint-and-brush bitmap drawing icon.
Click again, and the structured drawing icon reappears. For a complete explanation of structured and bitmap drawings, see Chapter 8: Graphics.
Drawing Tnnls This part of the tool palette contains eight drawing tools. They are the paintbrush, airbrush, fill, smear, polygon tool, rectangle, ellipse, and Bezier tools.
Gnlnur Snb-Palette This section of the tool palette allows you to select your ink and background colours. A palette of sixteen colours is Balloon Create Text Drawing Mode Bitmap Create Paintbrush Airbrush Fill Smear Polygon Rectangle Ellipse Bezier lllittMIHiOIKHiriilUM I ' . . ‘ t I I I I ) 1 I I M I H n 111111111 aHMMM I i ll I I J I IIIIKIII I 1 M n » I
• i ] I I i I I I I I I I 1 • I . • » • • 1 ¦ « I t I I
• I I I « ’ . I I I tl I I M I . • . . WMMMM II - l! i h I i •
- I I I Mllllllt ¦ I I I t I I I ! I | i ' ¦ 1 I I ¦;
I i i . ! : . * » i : I i i I J 1 « Colour Palette Fill
Toggle Fill Pattern Line Width Selector given. Each colour can
be changed to any of the 4096 possible colours. The “fill
toggle” gadget allows you to turn fill on or off. The “fill
pattern” gadget shows the selected fill pattern. Every colour
can be changed by double-clicking on that gadget, which brings
up a Colour Palette requester.
Line Width Selector This gadget allows you to select the width of the line you are drawing with. The line width can be adjusted by clicking on either the right arrow to increase the thickness, or the left arrow to decrease thickness.
By holding the left mouse button down while over an arrow, the line thickness will continue to increase until you release the button. A dashed line indicates that no line will be drawn.
Scroll Bars ComicSetter allows you to create pages that are larger than can be shown on the screen. The “scroll” bars are located on the bottom and right side of the ComicSetter screen, and they allow you to view and work with any part of a large page that can’t be viewed in its entirety. They are standard Amiga scroll bars, and are used by holding down the left mouse button to grab onto a portion of the bar and dragging to move your point of view around the page. Clicking on the arrows at either end of the scroll bars allows you to adjust the view by small amounts.
Page Numler Gadget The “page number” gadget, at the lower right-hand comer of the screen, displays the number of the page currently being worked on in your ComicSetter document. To see how this works, select Layout Add Page to create a page. When the Add Page requester comes up, click on the OK gadget. The centre part of the ComicSetter screen will turn from black to white as a blank page is created. The page number gadget will change from Page 0 to Page 1. Select Layout Delete Page. A requester will appear, select OK to delete the page. The page number gadget will again indicate Page 0 (no
pages in the document). The number of pages in a ComicSetter document is only limited by disk space. The number of elements and objects on a page is limited by how much memory you have available.
Selecting the Proper Tool As you learn how to use ComicSetter, you must remember to select the proper tool for the proper working mode. Remember to look at the tool palette and check to see which tool is selected. For example: you may be trying to alter one object when another object is active. This is a common source of confusion. Simply select the null pointer tool, click on the object you want to work with, and then start again.
Pointer Shapes ComicSetter will change the shape of the pointer depending operation that you are attempting. There are four different pointer shapes. The first is the “null pointer”, which is what ComicSetter starts out with. The null pointer can be selected by clicking on the null pointer tool. The null pointer allows you to select and move objects on the screen.The “create pointer” signifies that ComicSetter is ready to create something. This can be anything from a new panel, to any of the graphic elements. The “move pointer” indicates that you can move your field of view about your
page, or move objects around. The “sizing pointer” will appear when you are attempting to re-size an object or panel. It returns back to its previous pointer when the re-sizing operation is complete.
N the The final pointer is the “sleepy pointer”. This pointer will appear whenever the program is busy doing a task.
Keyboard Equivalents ComicSetter supports a large variety of “keyboard equivalents.” These are short-cuts that allow you to access many menu selections by pressing two keys on the keyboard. When you become more proficient with ComicSetter, you will begin to see how useful these shortcuts really are. A menu selection that has a keyboard equivalent will show the equivalent beside the selection in the menu.
For example, the keyboard equivalent for the Project Open selection is A O. For a complete list of all keyboard equivalents, see Appendix B: Keyboard Shortcuts.
Keyboard Modifiers “Keyboard modifiers” are used in conjunction with tools to alter their purpose. This is accomplished by holding down a specific key while using the mouse. Throughout the manual, keyboard modifiers are explained in their applicable sections. Also, Appendix B: Keyboard Shortcuts, contains a full list of all keyboard modifiers.
Printer Environment If you have not already done so, you should configure ComicSetter to the type of printer that you will be using. This is done through the WorkBench using Preferences. ComicSetter will automatically gather information about the printer driver, and configure itself to your printer’s resolution. ComicSetter comes with the WorkBench 1.3 printer drivers. For more information on how to configure WorkBench 1.3, see Appendix C: Printer Information.
TUTORIAL 3 The best way to learn ComicSetter is experimentation. With some practice, assisted by the Tutorial and other reference information in this manual, you can learn to take full advantage of every powerful ComicSetter feature and produce a wide range of dynamic graphic creations. In this tutorial you will produce a simple one-page, one-panel comic and print it. The principles that you are introduced to in this tutorial will provide the basic steps in organising any similar project. At all times, feel free to experiment with the various functions of ComicSetter at your command.
To run the tutorial, you need:
• A working copy of the ComicSetter Program (see magazine).
• A working copy of the Clip-Art Disk (see magazine).
• A blank, formatted data disk.
• A suitable output device.
If you are not already running ComicSetter, start up described in the Getting Started Chapter.
) the program as Creating a Page The first step is to create a page. To do this:
• Hold down the right mouse and move the pointer to the Layout
menu. When the pointer touches the word Layout, a “pull-down
menu” appears.
• Keep holding down the right mouse button, move the pointer down
to the Add Page item, then release the mouse button. An Add
Page requester window appears, showing a number of adjustable
settings. For the moment, use the default settings.
• Click once, with the left mouse button, on the OK gadget in the
lower left-hand comer of the requester. The requester will
disappear and the ComicSetter screen will change from black to
white representing the page you have created. Also, the
scroll bars on the bottom and right-hand side of the screen
will adjust to indicate what part of the page you are viewing.
Saving ComicSetter documents One important procedure that should be stressed when using ComicSetter, or any software product, is that you should save your work often. This “insurance” will pay for itself the first time you run into any difficulty. For example, saving a document before a major layout change will give you the option of returning to the original layout at any time. This can be extremely helpful, especially when first learning to use a computer or a particular program.
Before you actually begin creating your comic layout, you should learn how to Save and Load your documents. Although this tutorial is short, you may not be able to finish it in one session. Knowing how to save your current document gives you the option of stopping and later continuing from where you left off. Since you have already created a page, let’s demonstrate how to save the blank page, as a document, to disk. There are two ways of saving a document to disk. The first is the use of Save As.
To use Save As: :-a:n : :o
• Place your formatted data disk in the external disk drive, or
if your Amiga only has one disk drive, replace the ComicSetter
disk with the data disk.
• Select the Save As item from the Project menu.
• When the Save Document As requester appears, click on the DFO:
gadget if your data disk is in drive 0, or the DF1: gadget if
it is in drive 1.
• Click to the right of the FILE line. A cursor will appear
allowing you to type in the name of the document to be saved.
For this example, type TESTSAVE.
• Click OK to save the document. You will notice that the
filename that you have typed is now displayed on the title bar.
Also, if you pull down the Documents menu, the name of your
file, TESTSAVE, will appear to the right of the check mark.
With ComicSetter, it is possible to have more than one document in memory at one time. Every time you create or retrieve a new document, it will be added to the list in the Documents menu. This feature is discussed in more detail in the Documents section of the manual.
Ilsini the Save item: The second way of saving your document is to select Project Save. The Save item is very convenient when you are updating a file that you are working on. You could save modifications to the file frequently without the hassle of re-entering the same file name information.
Selecting Project Save causes your file to be saved immediately to the disk and directory that was used in the Save As operation. If the Save As has not been previously used, a Save Document As requester will appear.
Retrieviig or Opeiing Files If you want to load a previously saved file, select Project Open. To demonstrate this function, clear the document in memory, and restore the document that you have just saved.
To clear the document in memory:
• Select the Project Close item. If you have changed anything on
the page since the comic was last saved, a “Warning” requester
will appear asking if you wish to Save the comic again.
• Click on the No gadget. The page on screen will be erased.
The name of the document will, again, become Untitled.
To load the previously saved document:
• Select the Project Open command. A requester similar to the one
used in the Save As item will appear.
• Select the drive which contains your data disk. ComicSetter
will give you a list of all of the documents located on that
disk (in this tutorial there will only be one).
• Click on the TESTSAVE file. ComicSetter will take your selected
file, and transfer the name to the FILE line.
• Click on OK to load the file. ComicSetter will load that file,
and you will see your document on the screen. In this case, you
will see the blank page you created earlier.
Now that you know how to save and load files, you can begin the tutorial with the option of stopping and restarting any time you wish. Again, a reminder to frequently save your document. It is very easy to load a previously saved document, but much harder to recreate it from scratch if something should go wrong. Before starting, lets ensure that preferences are set correctly:
• Select Preferences Show Boxes
• From the Preferences menu, select Units Pixels. This means that
all coordinates will be displayed in pixels.
Panels Every comic layout, from a full comicbook to a single-picture comic, consists of a number of panels. Panels are working frames in which you assemble your images. In ComicSetter, all of your images and text must be created within panels. This allows you to move a panel, with all of its contents, to a new location.
A panel is not restricted by size, and can be up to a full page in dimension.
Adding a Panel:
• Click on the Panel Create tool in the tool palette. Your
pointer will change into a cross-hair.
• Position the pointer to where you want the top left-hand corner
of the panel to appear. For this tutorial, the exact position
doesn’t matter, but you should place it in the area of (10, 10)
as indicated by the coordinate position indicator gadget.
• Hold down the left mouse button and, by moving the mouse, drag
the crosshairs to the position where the bottom right-hand
comer of the panel should be, in the general area of (560,
180). A large rectangle should be drawn out in the process.
When you are satisfied with the position, release the mouse
button. The panel’s border will change to a dashed line
indicating that it is active.
Magnification ComicSetter gives you four different magnification levels in which to work: 200%, 100%, Full Page, and 50%. Zooming in is useful for adding fine details to your layouts. Zooming out can show your entire page.
A closer look To view your panel up close:
• Select Preferences Magnify 200%. The page will zoom in to fill
the screen. Now only a small part of your panel will be
visible. However, you can move your field of view to see other
parts of the page.
To see the right side of the panel:
• Grab the bottom scroll bar and drag it about two inches to the
right.
When you release the button, you should see the top right hand side of the panel. The same procedure applies to the vertical scroll bar.
To see how our new panel looks in relation to the entire page, we can view the document in Full Page magnification mode.
A full page view:
• Select Preferences Magnify Full Page. The page will zoom to
full view, to appear as a white rectangle on a black
background.
All features of the program will work in any given magnification level.
From this point, freely use any magnification level you desire. The tutorial will prompt you to set a particular magnification level only when it is necessary for completing a specific function of this tutorial.
However, for speedy response, we recommend you work in 100%.
Selecting and Moving Panels Before moving or changing a panel it must be selected and made active. An active panel has a dashed border. An inactive panel has a solid border. To demonstrate:
• Click on any part of the page which does not contain a panel.
This will de-select your original panel. The panel will have a
solid border signifying that it is inactive. To select a panel:
• Move the pointer over the panel that you wish to select and
while pressing the Right-ALT key, click on the panel with the
left mouse button. The border now changes from a solid to
dashed line, indicating an active panel. To move a panel:
• Make sure that the panel is selected.
• Move the pointer over the panel and grab onto it while holding
down the Right-Alt key by pressing and holding down the left
mouse button. Your pointer changes to a Hand.
• Move the mouse to drag the panel to its new location and
release the button. It’s that simple. The Comic Let’s start
creating the tutorial comic:
• Clear the page of the panel(s) that you have created by making
the panel active and selecting Edit Erase.
• Create a panel with the top left hand comer near (10, 10) and
the bottom right hand comer near (560, 180).
Impirtiig a Background For the tutorial comic, begin by importing a background into the active panel:
• Make the panel active.
• Select Project Import Graphics, or double-click the Bitmap
Create tool.
Your pointer will change to a cross hair. ComicSetter is now waiting for you to define the area into which the graphic should be imported.
• Position the pointer inside and near the top left-hand corner
of the panel.
• Hold down the left mouse button and drag out a rectangle to the
bottom right-hand corner of the panel. The background you will
import will fit in this guide. The portions of the graphic
outside of the panel will not be visible. ComicSetter will now
display a file requester similar to the one shown earlier when
you saved your document.
• Insert your ClipArt disk into your external drive, or if your
Amiga only has an internal drive replace the ComicSetter or
data disk with the ClipArt disk.
• Click on the disk drive number gadget corresponding to your
Clipart disk to view its files in the file requester.
• Click on the line that reads BKGDS. This will open the
directory for Background clipart.
• Select the file named Interior-Tech.
• Click on OK. The file requester will disappear and a new window
will appear showing you the background that you will import
into the tutorial comic.The “Graphic Clipping” window is placed
on top of the existing ComicSetter window, and may be moved or
sized.
Along the top of the graphic clipping window are five gadgets which are explained in the Bitmap Graphics section of this manual For now, your concern is to clip a section of the background to fit exactly into the guide that you have created.
• Click on the “Guide Clip” tool, the 'G’ gadget along the top of
the graphic window. As you move the pointer, a rectangle, the
same size as the guide you drew, will move along with it. If
you move the pointer outside of the Graphic window, the picture
inside the window will scroll in that direction.
• Once you have established the desired position, click the left
mouse button. You should see your background appear in your
panel right before your eyes.
Importing Characters Now you need some characters to place on top of the background. The process for importing characters is identical to the process for importing backgrounds, props, your own images, etc.
• Select Project Import Graphics.
• Draw a small guide on top of the background you just imported.
The Import Graphic clipping window will appear with your
previous background. Since we want a new image, choose the File
tool which is second from the left.
• When the file requester appears, choose the PARENT item at the
top of the list. This brings you back one directory level.
• Select the MALE directory to view its files.
• Select Med_Poses_&_Parts.
• Click on OK.
You will be piecing together a character from the parts given in this screen. If you try using the Guide function to clip out the character’s parts, as we did with the background, you might clip out unwanted portions of other images within the clipping rectangle. For this reason, ComicSetter gives you the ability to clip images using a polygon tool. This offers unlimited control over the objects that you clip, regardless of how irregularly-shaped they may be. First clip out the character’s upper body part which is located at the far left side of the graphic window:
• Select the polygon clipping tool located at the far right side
along the top of the graphic window. The pointer will change to
an X shape indicating ComicSetter is ready to polygon clip.
• Move the pointer to a position, anywhere around the character’s
upper body part and press-and-release the left mouse button.
Now, when you move the mouse, a line will be drawn from the
position where you clicked to the current pointer position.
• Move the mouse pointer further around the character and press
the button again. The line will be fixed to the second point,
and you will be able to continue with a second line. In this
manner, you will be able to completely enclose the image by
carefully drawing a series of lines around it. The lines can be
as long or as short as you wish.
• When you have enclosed your image, quickly double click the
left mouse button. The image that you have clipped will now be
transferred to your comic layout.
More than likely, the clipped image, called an object, will not be in the precise position you desire. But, don’t worry. ComicSetter gives you the full ability to edit and move these objects. And, since every object on the screen is kept track of separately, they may be moved and treated independently of one another.
To novo your object:
• Position the pointer over to the object that you wish to move,
and while pressing and holding the left mouse button drag the
object to the desired location.
Cootiooe Building Obviously, you still need a head and the lower part of the body to finish your character. Continue to select Project Import Graphics, using the Polygon clipping tool to select the pieces that you wish. Once these pieces are on the panel, move them so they connect together. Complete the character.
Talk to me!!
ComicSetter gives you the unique ability to enter dialogue as speech balloons, and then edit this text at any time. Here’s how:
• Click on the Balloon tool in the tool palette.
Your pointer will change to a cross-hair, indicating that a speech balloon may be drawn.
• Move the pointer to anywhere over the panel, hold down the left
mouse button, and drag out a rectangle for your speech balloon.
When you release the mouse button, ComicSetter will present you with an Enter Text requester.
• Type in the caption you want your character to say. We suggest
’’COMICSETTER MAKES MY DAY!”
• Hit the RETURN key. ComicSetter will create a round speech bal
loon with this caption inside it.
Depending on the length of your caption, the entire text may not fit in the speech balloon. You will have to re-size your balloon, Details in chapter 12: Balloons.
Round speech balloons are nice, but they are not complete until a tail is added, signifying that the character is speaking.
A speech balloon consists of two components: the text component and the graphic component. To add a tail, we only wish to modify the graphic component.
Remember that a speech balloon is really just an object, similar to the background or character that you clipped earlier. Before you can modify an object you have to make it active:
• Click on the speech balloon to make it the active object. You
will notice that the outline becomes dashed, but wait...
another box appears inside the balloon (if you don’t see this,
make sure that Preferences Show Boxes is selected). Remember,
a balloon is made up of two components. The graphic component
is the outside part, and the box within is the text component.
To tell ComicSetter that you only want to modify the outside graphic component:
• Position the pointer within the dashed outline of the balloon,
but not over the smaller inside text box.
• While pressing the CTRL key, click on the left mouse button.
Several small rectangles will appear around the outline of the balloon. These are called control points. Control points allow fantastic manipulation of graphics.
Finally, let’s add the tail:
• Move the pointer onto a control point, preferably one closest
to your character’s mouth.
• Hold down the left mouse button while dragging out a tail.
• Release the button when you are satisfied with the tail’s
location.
To move a whole balloon:
• Deactivate the balloon by clicking anywhere outside of the
balloon.
O
• Reactivate the balloon by clicking on it with the left mouse
button, and drag to the desired location. The reason for
deactivating and reactivating is that you had previously
activated only the outside component of the balloon. Experiment
and see first-hand what happens in either situation.
Print Having completed your first comic on screen, the last remaining function of this Tutorial is printing out a copy for everyone to see. You should have your printer and Preferences set so we can print the comic immediately.
• Select Project Print.... ComicSetter pops up a Print Document
requester. Check to ensure that Grey Scale is selected if you
are using a standard black & white printer, or that Colour is
selected if you are using a colour printer.
• Select Start. Your printer should start to print your comic
after a few seconds.
Conclusion You have created a comic! Where do you go from here? Experiment.
There are many additional features that weren’t discussed in this tutorial. Only through experimenting with the various features listed in the following chapters will you actually acquire skill in their use. The following chapters are not in the “hands-on tutorial” style, but will explain all of ComicSetter’s advanced features in detail.
The comic that you have just created is a great starting point for further experiments with more advanced features. The tutorial example file is saved under the filename: COMIC.FINAL and can be loaded from the TUTORIAL directory of the Clip-Art disk. Of course, yours won’t look exactly like the example, but if nothing has gone wrong, it should be similar.
DOCUMENTS 4 M document is a page, or collection of pages, created with ft ComicSetter. Besides Saving and Opening individual documents, ComicSetter gives you the ability to have several documents in memory at one time, and to transfer information between them.
Opening Documents The Project Open selection will produce an Open Document file requester and ComicSetter will immediately start reading the most recently accessed disk. This is DFO: by default.
Clicking on any of the drive gadgets, or selecting a directory, will cause ComicSetter to execute that action immediately. Clicking on a file name will transfer that name to the File line. Double clicking on a file name will tell ComicSetter to open that file.
If you are in a sub-directory, the first selection will always be PARENT . Clicking on this will take you back one level.
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documents:
• Select Project Save As. A file requester will appear. Click in
the line to the right of the word File to produce a cursor, and
type the name of the file. Then click on the OK gadget.
• Select Project Save. The file will be saved to whatever disk
and directory was used in the previous Save As operation. If
Save As has not been used, a Save As requester will appear when
Save is requested.
The Save item is very convenient when you are working on a comic, allowing you to save it often without the hassle of re-entering file name information.
Multiple Documents ComicSetter gives you the ability to have several Opened documents in memory at the same time, listing them in the Documents menu. Make selections from this menu to view the various documents you have opened. ComicSetter will not permit you open the same document twice at the same time.
New Documents The Project New command allows you to create a new document while keeping your old document intact. After selecting Project New, ComicSetter will appear as it does when you normally start the program, a black screen. However, the Documents menu will list all of the documents in memory.
Close Docnment If you wish to remove a document from the screen document directory, use the Project Close command. If you have made any changes since the last time that the document was saved, ComicSetter will produce a “Warning” requester stating this fact. Click No to close the document, Yes to bring up the Save Document requester, and Cancel to abort the operation.
PAGES A page in ComicSetter is similar to a printed page in a comic book or other publication. The dimensions and margins of the page are defined to match those that will be printed. As in traditional publications, images in ComicSetter will be drawn and laid out on these pages.
Iiiits You can select the units of measurement through the Preferences Units item: Pixels, Inches and Centimetres. The default value is Inches.
Changing units of measure will result in the use of those units throughout the program.
Addiii Pages The Layout Add Page selection will produce an Add Page requester which allows you to define the following page attributes:
• Size: ComicSetter offers a choice of four predefined page
sizes: Standard, Legal, A4 and A6. Selecting a page size will
display its dimensions in the width and height indicators in
the selected units of measure.
Custom page specifications are available by selecting Custom, and typing the desired dimensions in the width and height indicator lines.
Regardless of the Units and output resolution, the maximum size of a page is 1008x1008 pixels.
• Margins: The margin feature is used in conjunction with the
AutoPanel feature. By default, ComicSetter provides a 0.5 inch
margin on all sides of the page, but any value from zero to
the maximum page size may be entered. Margins do not restrict
manual placement of panels. The margin sizes will vary in
pixels depending on the output resolution setting in
Project Environment Setup. (See Chapter 16)
• AutoPanel: ComicSetter can create a page with ready-made
panels.
To the right of the AutoPanel gadget are the X and Y value indicators. X represents the number of panels horizontally, and Y the number of panels vertically.
Horizontal and Vertical gaps are the respective spacings between the horizontal (X) panels, and the vertical (Y) panels.
Selecting Pages The page visible on the screen is always the active page. Pages can be selected using the Page Number gadget at the bottom right side of the ComicSetter screen:
• Click on the Page Number gadget for its requester.
• Click on the up or down arrows to change the page number by one
value in either direction. Or click on the page number line and
type in the desired page number using the keyboard.
Deleting Pages ComicSetter allows you to delete a page, as well as a group of consecutive pages, without having to view that specific page by:
• Select Layout Delete Page. ComicSetter will produce a Delete
Page requester.
• Click on the range and type in the range of pages you wish to
delete; then Click on OK.
Moving Pages Selecting Layout Move Page command will bring up a Move Page requester which has three areas for input:
• Range X to Y: You can move a group of consecutive pages. X
value represents the starting page and Y value is the ending
page number.* After Page: This is the page that you wish to
insert your group after.
All of the pages in the requested range will be moved after this page.
The order of pages within the group will stay the same.
A panel encloses all images for a particular comic frame. As with traditional comics, ComicSetter panels are rectangular, and may have a border of variable thickness and colour. All objects must be created within a panel. Therefore, a panel is the first element required on a ComicSetter page. If a panel is moved, all of its associated images will move with it. In this regard, a panel acts as a common anchor point.
PANELS By default, an image will not be visible outside of its panel, but ComicSetter does provide the option of altering this, and for moving objects to other parts of the page as described in Chapter 8: Graphics.
Creating Clicking on the Panel Create gadget changes the pointer to a cross hair signifying that a panel may be created. Hold down the left mouse button while dragging out a rectangle. The Panel Create mode remains active until you cancel it by selecting another gadget.
Constraining Panels Hold down the SHIFT key while dragging out a panel to constrain the panel to a square. In some magnification levels, the screen representation may not look like a square. However, ComicSetter takes the resolution of the output printer into consideration and will print a true square.
AutoPanels AutoPanels allow you to create a page containing a specified number of panels. See Chapter 5: Pages, for a full explanation of the AutoPanel feature.
Selecting Panels A selected panel has a dashed highlight around it; non-selected has no highlight; and the panel containing a selected object has a solid highlight. ComicSetter will also display the panel’s printable borders by default. ComicSetter allows you to select individual panels in two ways:
• Move the pointer over any part of the panel and while press
ing the Right-ALT key, click the left mouse button.
• Select the Marquee Tool, hold down the Right-ALT key, and drag
out a rectangular frame around the panel to select.
By using Extended Select you can select more than one panel and modify all of the selected panels simultaneously. There are several ways to select more than one panel:
• Select the first panel by holding down the Right-Alt key, then
hold down the right-SHIFT key to select additional panels. All
of the selected panels will have dashed borders.
• Use the Marquee tool, hold down the Right-ALT key, and drag out
a rectangular frame around all of the panels you wish to
select.
• Ensure that NO panels are selected by clicking anywhere on the
page outside of the panels and objects. Then select Edit Select
All to select all of the panels on the page.
To De-Select a Paeel:
• Select another single panel. This will de-select the first
panel.
• Select any object or group within any panel.
• Click on any part of the page which does not contain any panels
or objects.
If you have a set of panels selected, the above three methods will de-select all of the panels. If you wish to de-select one panel from a set of selected panels, click on that panel while depressing the Right-Amiga key.
Moviig There are two ways to move panels:
• Grab and move the selected panel directly on the screen.
• Enter exact co-ordinates for the panel’s position into the
panel’s attributes requester. See Panel Attributes (below).
Siziig Changing a panel’s size leaves the objects in the panel at their old sizes and positions. The portion of each object which is visible will be adjusted to the panel’s new edge.
Using the mouse:
• There are eight control around the selected panel’s border.
• Grab the control point, and drag it to its new dimensions.
Grabbing a side control point allows you to only size that
side. A comer control point allows you to size two intersecting
sides.
ComicSetter provides an option which allows you to enter the exact size of the panel using the keyboard. This will be discussed later in this chapter under Attributes.
Sealiig Scaling a panel will also scale the contents of that panel by the same proportions.
Using the mouse:
• Hold down the Left-ALT key and grab a control point by pressing
and holding down the left mouse button.
• Drag the panel to its new dimensions and release the mouse
button.
Deleting Panels Panels can be deleted in two ways:
• Select the panel and press the DELETE key.
• Select the panel and choose the Edit Erase item.
Panel Attributes The Alter Panel Attributes selection gives you full control over all aspects of the selected panel.
Position The Position indicator allows you to specify the exact location of the top left-hand comer of the selected panel in relation to the top left-hand comer of the comic page. The position is indicated in units of measure selected in Preferences Units.
• Position X Y: The X value represents the horizontal distance
from the left side of the page to the left side of the panel.
The “Y” value represents the vertical distance from the top
side of the page to the top of the panel.
Size The top left-hand comer of the panel is specified by the Position indicator. The other comer locations are controlled using Size values X and Y:
• The X value represents the horizontal size (width) of the
panel.
• The Y value represents the vertical size (height) of the panel.
Scale It is possible to scale a panel up or down in size. Scaling will also scale the contents of the panel to the same proportions. Use the Scale values X and Y:
• The X value represents the horizontal scaling factor that is to
be applied. The position of the left side of the panel will
remain fixed and the right side will adjust accordingly.
• The Y value represents the vertical scaling factor that is to
be applied.
The top side of the panel will remain fixed and the bottom side will adjust accordingly.
Border Width Most comic panels have borders. ComicSetter allows you to change border widths. The default border width is 1 pixel but panel borders may range from 0, or no border, to a maximum thickness of 16 pixels. Width is specified in pixels.
Border Colour By default the panel border is black. However, ComicSetter provides a selection of sixteen chosen colours for the border:
• Click on the up or down arrows to cycle through the colours.
ComicSetter provides grids to help you position panels more precisely. In addition to being a visual guide, the grids in ComicSetter can automatically align panels and objects to the grid line intersections - something that grids on paper can’t do. The grid lines will not print out on your final page.
Grid spacing is specified in the units selected in Preferences Units.
ComicSetter allows you to vary the grid spacing by entering a user- definable value.
Display The Preferences Show Grid selection is used for displaying a grid on the ComicSetter screen. The default value is 10 pixels by 10 pixels.
Showing the grids will not restrict any panel or object manipulation; this is only a visual guide. Grids can be turned off by again selecting Preferences Show Grid.
Changing Grid Size Selecting the Preferences Change Grid... item will present a requester allowing you to set the Grid Spacing.
• Horiz. Allows you to change the horizontal grid distances.
• Vert, allows you to change the vertical grid distances.
The values are entered in units-of-measure corresponding to the Preferences Units selection.The minimum grid setting is 1 by 1 pixels, although a grid setting with such a low value would not be very useful.
Snappiig Preferences Snap to Grid allows you to accurately position panels at grid intersections. When the Snap to Grid item is selected, all objects being created or moved will align the top-left comer of the object to the nearest grid intersections.
GRAPHICS ComicSetter allows you to introduce graphic components to your comics in two ways:
• By creating them within the ComicSetter program using the
graphics tools in the tool palette.
• By importing previously created graphics from Clip-Art disks,
or any other source. ComicSetter accepts any standard Amiga IFF
image (except HAM).
Bitmapped and Structured Graphics.
ComicSetter allows you to use and manipulate two different forms of graphics:
• Bitmapped graphics that are created by paint programs such as
Deluxe Paint II, Aegis Images, etc. You create an area, called
a bitmap, and then modify the pixels in that bitmap to create a
picture.
• Structured drawings created from components that are
mathematically defined. These components can be lines, arcs,
and curves, each with line weight and fill pattern attributes.
Structured drawings require less memory than Bitmap objects. It is also possible to alter structured drawings after they are created.
Graphics Made taal The Graphics Mode tool allows you to select either structured or bitmapped graphics drawing modes.When the Graphics Mode tool resembles a palette and paint brush, ComicSetter is in bitmapped graphics mode. When the tool resembles a T-square and triangle, Objects All ComicSetter graphic elements are called objects, whether they are bitmapped, structured, or even plain text.
Objects react similarly to panels in that they can be moved, sized and scaled. Objects can be placed over one another to create desired images.
Bitmapped Objects Before you can create any bitmap graphic in ComicSetter, you must define a blank bitmap object. Once defined, this object may be modified with the tools provided'in the tool palette. For more information on creating blank bitmapped objects, see chapter 9: Bitmap Graphics.
Structured Objects Structured graphics, unlike bitmapped graphics, do not require an object to be defined before creating the graphic. Simply create the structured graphic in a panel. Structured graphics are covered in Chapter 10: Structured Graphics.
Text Objects Text is handled in a similar manner as a graphic import. ComicSetter requires that you drag out the text object, then enter the desired text.
For more information, see Chapter 11: Text.
All objects must be created within a panel, and there is no limit to the number of objects that may be contained in a panel.
Selecting Objects.
A non-selected object is displayed with no border, see Preferences Show Boxes to show borders around non-selected objects.
A selected object is displayed with a dashed border. To select an object:
• Simply click on the object using the left mouse button. Unlike
selecting panels, using a keyboard modifier is not required.
However, the different individual and multiple selection
methods are still applicable, including:
• Selecting objects ndividually by clicking on them.
• Using the Marquee Tool to select more then one object.
• Using the Left-Shift key to Extended Select additional objects.
Using the Left-Amiga key to de-select a single object from an Extended Select set.
• Using the Edit Select All item to select all objects in a
selected panel.
Muring Objects Objects can be moved by grabbing them and using the left mouse button. If the object is not the currently selected object, it will become become active. More than one object may be moved at once. Extend- select the objects to be moved and then, while holding the L-SHIFT, pick up any one of the objects you want to move. The rest will move along with it, keeping the same relative positions.
Groppiig Bitmapped Objects.
ComicSetter allows you to crop Bitmapped objects by grabbing and moving any of the eight control points around the selected object.
Cropping a bitmap doesn’t change the image’s size, but reduces the amount of the image which is visible. The bitmap can later be enlarged back to its original size, revealing the portions which have been hidden by previous cropping. It is not possible to crop a bitmap larger than its original size.
Scaliig Bitmapped amd Structured Bbjects.
Bitmapped objects can be enlarged or reduced in size. Unlike cropping, scaling alters the image in your object. For example: scaling a bitmapped object to twice its size, will make the individual pixels of the image twice as large.
Scaling a structured graphic will not affect its resolution since it is mathematically defined. The end result would be a larger or smaller graphic, but the individual pixels making up the graphic would not change in size.To scale bitmapped and structured objects:
• Hold down the Left-ALT key, grab any control point around the
selected object, and scale to the desired size.
Scaling Text Bbjects Scaling a text object will result in the text box changing size while the Object Attributes Horiz. I 1.433 Posi tion
9. 73* Vert.
Horiz.
Vert.
Seal in® Visible outside Panel Transparent Color WTJ CanceTTj text within remains unaltered. To scale text objects:
• Hold down the Left-ALT key, grab any control point around the
the object and scale to the desired size.
Chaiging Object Attributes As with panels, full control over objects is provided through the Alter Current... selection. This selection works similarly for bitmapped, structured and text objects:
• Select the object you wish to alter.
• Select the Alter Current... item.
ComicSetter will present an Object Attributes requester into which changes may be entered.
Position The Position indicator allows you to specify the exact location of the top-left comer of the selected object in relation to the top-left comer of its panel The values are displayed according to the units of measure selected in the Preferences Units menu.
• Horiz.: This value controls the horizontal distance from the
left hand side of the panel.
• Vert.: This value controls the vertical distance from the top
side of the panel.
Scaling It is possible to scale an object up or down.
• Horiz.: This value controls the horizontal scaling factor. The
left side will be anchored, and the right side of the object
will be adjusted accordingly.
• Vert.: This value controls the vertical scaling factor. The top
side will be anchored, and the bottom side of the object will
be adjusted accordingly.
Visibility By default, all objects outside of a panel are not visible. If an object is partially outside, it will be cropped at the panel border. However, ComicSetter allows you to override this setting, allowing an object to be visible regardless of its position on the page.
Transparent Colour In each object, one of 16 colours is actually “transparent”, allowing whatever is behind to be seen. By default, white is each object’s transparent colour. Use this gadget to change the transparent colour of an object. In many cases, what is behind, is the page which is white in colour.
ComicSetter allows you to specify a different transparent colours for each object.
Line Width The Line Width selector at the bottom of the tool palette allows you to select the width of the lines drawn by the following tools: polygon, rectangle, ellipse, and Bezier drawing tools, in both Bitmap and Structured modes. If a structured graphic object, or a speech balloon, is active, changing the width selector will immediately change the width of the lines in that object.
As well, future graphics will be drawn with the selected line width until another selection is made.
For bitmapped graphics, you will have to select the line width desired before you start to create the image. Colour Palette The Colour Palette behaves similarly to the line width selector. If you wish to change the colour of an active structured, or speech balloon, object:
• Select a new colour from the colour palette. Your object will
change colour immediately.
Note again that this only applies to structured object, and speech balloons, not to bitmapped objects.The selected colour indicator displays the selected foreground and background colours. To select a different foreground colour:
• Click on the foreground indicator in the selected colour
indicator.
• Click on any colour in the colour palette.
The same process applies for changing the background colour.
By default, the (1 jforeground colour will be black, and no background colour will be specified.
The bottom two gadgets in the colour palette are used with background colours. The tool on the right is the (3)Pattem Fill selector. The tool on the left is (4)No Fill.
Selecting No Fill:
• Select the Background indicator.
• Select the No Fill tool.
• This will result in no background colour.
By default, Fill is turned off.
(3) Selecting a Pattern:
• Select the Background indicator.
• Select the Pattern tool. The background colour will be set to
the current fill pattern. The Pattern tool will always indicate
the current pattern.
To change the Background pattern:
• Double click on the Pattern tool. ComicSetter will present you
with a Fill Patterns requester.
• Select any of the twenty-five patterns. Each pattern is made up
of four colours. On the right side of the requester, the four
basic colours are shown. Click on the arrows beside each of the
colour indicators to change that colour.
• The SET option is only valid if you are changing the background
of an existing, editable graphic, such as a structured or text
object.
Selecting SET will change the Current Pattern into the pattern used by the object that you are editing. This option allows you to recall previously used patterns and colour combinations.
Changing Cnlnnr ComicSetter allows you to specify any of the Amiga’s 4096 colours as your 16 working colours. It is strongly suggested that the first two colours (white and black) be left alone. If these colours are changed, gadgets, menus, and requesters may become difficult (or even impossible) to read. It is wise to leave the last two colours (medium and dark grey) alone as well, but they are less important than white and black.
To change any of the 16 working colours:
• Double click on the colour in the colour palette that you wish
to change. ComicSetter will display a Colour requester.
The Colour requester permits you to change the overall Red, Green, and Blue components of the colour that you wish to create.
Modification of the Hue, Luminance, and Saturation is also possible.
To change any of the values, grab and drag the corresponding selector bar. As you move the selector, the new colour that you are creating is simultaneously displayed at the bottom right position of the Colour Palette.
• The R, G, and B sliders control the amount of Red, Green, and
Blue components in your colour. There are 16 different levels
for each.
• The H slider controls the Hue of colour. This is the colour’s
relative position in the colour spectrum, similar to the
colours of a rainbow.
• The L slider controls the Luminance of the colour. Think of
this as the intensity, or brightness of colour. The lower the
slider, the more black is added to the colour. When the slider
is at the very bottom, the colour black will always result.
• The S slider controls the Saturation of the colour. Think of
this as the degree of pure colour. The lower the slider, the
more white is added to the colour.
Using the H, L, and S sliders give you an alternative method of selecting colours. When you alter any of these sliders, the R, G, and B values change accordingly.
Spread allows you to specify a starting and ending colour and have ComicSetter generate a spread of colours in between the two.
• Create the colour at one end of the spread.
• Create the colour at the other end. The relative locations of
the starting and ending colours is important for it defines
the number of intermediate colours that will be generated.
• With one of the two colours active, click Spread and then click
on the other colour.
Exch. Allows you to exchange the location of two colours in the colour palette. This is useful when you wish to change a certain colour throughout your comic.
• Select the first colour to exchange.
• Select the Exch. Tool.
• Select the second colour to be exchanged. The two colours will
change locations.Copy allows you the duplicate one of the 16
current colours onto another colour location.
• Select the colour to be duplicated.
• Select Copy.
• Select the palette location into which you wish to copy the
first colour.
Cancel will disregard all modifications that you have made to the colour palette, and restore the previous palette. Undo will undo just the last change you made.
BITMAPS Importing The process of importing bitmap graphics was quickly covered in the Tutorial. This section explains in detail the different features of the Import Graphics function.
A bitmap graphic can only be imported into a panel. Therefore, prior to selecting Project Import Graphics..., create a panel on the page.
To import a graphic:
• Select Import Graphics... (a shortcut is to double-click the
Blank Bitmap tool). The pointer will change to a cross hair
indicating that a frame or guide to receive the graphic should
be drawn.
• Drag out a frame within the panel. This frame does not restrict
the size of the imported graphic but is used as a reference for
the Guide clipping function (explained later in this section).
A file requester will appear if nothing has been imported yet.
• Enter the proper drive, directory and filename of the graphic
you wish to import. ComicSetter will present the Graphic
Clipping window.
By default, the Graphic Clipping window is displayed at the centre of the screen. The window may be resized and moved about the screen.
ComicSetter will remember these alterations the next time the Graphic Clipping window is displayed.
Move the mouse pointer outside of the window to scroll the image in the direction of the pointer. The farther the pointer is from the window, the faster ComicSetter will scroll the image. An alternate method for scrolling is pressing the four keyboard arrow keys. Holding the SHIFT key down will increase the scrolling speed.
The functions of the five tools across the top of the Graphic Clipping window, in order, are:
• Cancel Import, the standard Amiga Close gadget on the left,
is selected to cancel the graphic import function.
• The New Image tool, is selected to produce the file requester,
allowing you to select a different image file.
• Guide. ComicSetter remembers the dimensions of the frame or
guide that was drawn within the panel after selecting Import
Graphics.... Selecting the Guide clipping tool will produce a
rectangular clipping frame of identical dimensions. Move the
frame over the area of the image that you wish to clip and
click on the left mouse button.
• The Rectangle Clip tool is selected to define a new rectangular
clipping frame.
• The rightmost tool, Polygon Clipping allows clipping of
irregular shapes. Click the left mouse button to draw a polygon
around the image. The lines can be of any length. To terminate
the polygon, double click the left mouse button. ComicSetter
will automatically create a final line joining the last point
of the frame, with the starting point.
Creating a blank Bitmap Object.
To create a blank bitmap inside a panel:
• Select the Blank Bitmap tool. Your pointer will change into a
cross-hair.
• Drag out the object. The dashed border indicates that it is the
current object. ComicSetter remains in the Object Create mode,
allowing you to create more blank bitmaps.
An object may extend beyond its panel. The only restriction to the Blank Bitmap tool is that the starting comer of the object must initially be inside of the panel. After creation, the object can be moved completely off of the panel.
Constraining Objects To create square bitmaps, hold down the SHIFT key while using the Blank Bitmap tool. Depending on the viewing magnification, and screen resolution, the result may not appear to be square. However, ComicSetter takes the printer output resolution into consideration and the object will print as a true square. By releasing the SHIFT key, you will again be able to generate rectangles.
Modifying a Bitmap Olject ComicSetter provides eight different tools to add to the contents of bitmap objects, imported clip art as well as images created entirely within the program. To modify a bitmap object, make sure that the object is active and that the Graphics Mode tool is set to bitmap.
Painting Tnnl Use the Paint tool to draw directly on the bitmap using the selected foreground colour. As long as the left mouse button is depressed, ComicSetter will trace your mouse movements.
Brush types Double clicking on the Paint tool will produce the Brush Types requester. Select any of the displayed brushes.
Gnntinnnns Line Tnnl The Line tool is used to create straight continuous lines.
• With the Line tool selected, move the pointer to a starting
position, click the left mouse button at that location and drag
out a line.
• Click the left mouse button at a second location; a line will
be drawn from the first point to the second point. Continue
clicking to create a connected sequence of lines.
• To terminate the sequence of lines, double-click the left mouse
button on the final point.
Closing Polygons ComicSetter can automatically close polygons. Hold down the CTRL key while double clicking to terminate the sequence of lines.
Constraining Hold down the SHIFT key to constrain lines to 45 or 90 degrees. This is useful if you wish to create perfectly horizontal, diagonal, or vertical lines with little effort.
Releasing the SHIFT key will allow you to resume creating lines at any angle.
Box Tool The box tool allows you to create rectangular shapes.With the Box tool selected, move the pointer to a starting location, hold down the left mouse button and drag.
Constraining boxes Hold down the SHIFT key while creating a box to generate squares.
Ellipse Tool The Ellipse tool allows you to create ellipses.With the Ellipse tool selected, move the pointer to the starting location and drag out the ellipse.
Constraining ellipses Hold down the SHIFT key while dragging out ellipses to generate true circles.
Fin tool The Fill tool allows you to fill in a closed area on the bitmap with the current background colour or pattern.
You can also fill an entire blank bitmap object with this feature. With the Fill tool selected, position the pointer inside the area that you wish to fill and click the left mouse button.
AirBrnsh Toni The Air Brush tool will spray a random stream onto the bitmap in the chosen foreground colour. The Air Brush is activated by holding down the left mouse button.
Air Brush settings: Double click on the Air Brush tool to produce the Air Brush Settings requester.
• Size controls the radius of the area the Air Brush will paint.
• Flow controls the rate that colour will flow onto the bitmap.
Smear Tool The Smear tool is used to mix up pixels within a specific distance of the pointer. This is useful for blending two joining colours within an object. Double clicking on the Smear tool produces the Smear Settings requester which is similar to the Air Brush Settings requester and operates in the same manner.
Bezier Corves The Bezier tool provides the ability to produce curves. This involves entering the location of four points to which ComicSetter fits a curve.
This function is performed interactively so you will always see the curves as they are developed.
This is a very powerful graphics tool which requires some experimentation to fully master. The following brief guide illustrates the power available through the use of Bezier curves. To produce a Bezier curve:
• Select the Bezier tool, and move the pointer to the location of
the first point.
• Press the left mouse button and drag out a line to the second
point and release the button.
• Move the pointer to the third location, and press the left
mouse button again. While holding down the left mouse button,
move the pointer to the location of the fourth point.
ComicSetter will display the location of the 3rd point while
you drag the pointer.
• When you release the button, the curve will be generated in the
bitmap object.
Continuing Beziers: A standard Bezier curve is composed of four points, but it is possible to draw a continuous curve which is built from a number of Beziers placed end-to-end. In this situation, the first point of the new bezier is the same as the last point of the old one and the second point of the new Bezier is automatically chosen so that the two Bezier join together smoothly. ComicSetter performs this automatically, while the additional curves are generated. To continue a Bezier:
• Hold down the CTRL key while generating the last two points of
a Bezier as previously described. When you release the left
mouse button to place the fourth point, the Bezier you have
just completed will be drawn as usual. In addition, the first
two points of a new Bezier will be placed automatically.
• Place the third and fourth points of the new Bezier as
described above. If, while you do this, you keep CTRL
depressed, you will have yet another half-completed Bezier at
the end. You can link a total of 30 Bezier together this way.
Constraining Beziers: Hold down the SHIFT key to constrain either of a Bezier curve’s tangent lines to 45 degree increments. You may constrain the first and last line segments of the Bezier curve, while freely placing the middle segment.
4 Line Width Tool The Line Width selector is active for the Continuous Line, Ellipse, Box, and Bezier tools. Be sure to select the proper line width before generating the graphic. In Bitmap mode, once the line is drawn, you will not be able to edit it.
Colour Colour should also be selected before the graphic is created. The foreground colour selector affects every graphic tool, with the exception of the fill tool. The fill tool uses the background colour for its operation.
If the background colour is set to a colour or pattern then the Continuous Line, Rectangle, Ellipse, and Bezier tools will fill their areas with this selection. For example: if the background colour is red, and the foreground colour is black, using the Box tool will produce a solid red rectangle with a black border. Experiment with these tools.
They can produce some surprising results.
The background colour can be turned off by selecting the No Fill tool. This allows graphics to be created without any fill. The foreground colour can not be turned off, but setting the line-width to zero will achieve the same effect.
A Pattern Fill can be chosen instead of a background colour, and operates similarly. See Chapter 8: Graphics.
Save Bitmap ComicSetter provides the ability to save an entire page, or just a panel, as a bitmap to disk. This powerful feature allows you to create a comic layout in ComicSetter, save it as a bitmap, and import this layout into any program which supports IFF graphics files.
This means your ComicSetter layouts may be imported into Professional Page and printed on a PostScript laser printer. Professional Page can also be used to professionally colour separate ComicSetter comics for colour offset printing.
ComicSetter layouts can also be imported into animation packages which support IFF graphic files.
To save a ComicSetter panel as a bitmap:
• Select Project Save bitmap Panel.... This will save the current
panel as a bitmap graphic. After selecting this item, a Save
Current Panel Bitmap As requester will appear on the screen.
Enter the disk, directory, and filename to which you wish to
save the bitmap.
To save a ComicSetter page as a bitmap:
• Select Project Save bitmap Page.... This will save the current
page as a bitmap graphic. After selecting this item, a Save
Current Page Bitmap As requester will appear. Enter the disk,
directory, and filename to which you wish to save the bitmap.
ComicSetter provides the ability to create Structured Graphic elements. Structured graphics are mathematically defined lines and curves. For this reason, they are completely editable and can print to the full resolution of the defined output resolution. Furthermore, structured graphics take up much less memory than bitmaps.
Creating A blank object does not have to be created prior to the actual creation of a structured graphic. As well, a structured graphic is completely editable with no restrictions to size, shape or colour once created. After a structured graphic is created, ComicSetter places a border around it, defining that object.
Graphic Mode Tool Before attempting to create a structured graphic, make sure that the graphics mode tool is properly set to structured graphics mode. Then select any of the appropriate tools and start creating your graphic.
Liao Tool The Line tool allows you to create straight continuous structured lines in the same way as bitmap lines are drawn.
• With the Line tool selected, move the pointer to a starting
position, click and drag out a line.
• Click the left mouse button at a second location; a line will
be drawn from the first point to the second point. Continue
clicking to create a connected sequence of lines.
• To terminate the Line draw tool, double-click the left mouse
button on the final point.
Closing Polygons ComicSetter can automatically close polygons. Hold down the CTRL key while double clicking to terminate the line function.
Constraining Hold down the SHIFT key to constrain lines to 45 or 90 degrees. This is useful if you wish to create perfectly horizontal, diagonal, or vertical lines with little effort. Releasing the SHIFT key will allow you to resume creating lines at any angle.
Box Tool The box tool allows you to create rectangular shapes.
With the Box tool selected, move the pointer to a starting location, hold down the left mouse button and drag out the rectangular guide.
Constraining boxes Hold down the SHIFT key while creating a box to generate squares.
* Ellipse Tool The Ellipse tool allows you to create
ellipses.With the Ellipse tool selected, move the pointer to
the starting location and drag out the ellipse.
Constraining ellipses Hold down the SHIFT key while dragging out ellipses to generate true circles.
Bezier Curves The Bezier tool provides the ability to produce curves. This involves entering the location of four points, to which ComicSetter fits a curve. This function is performed interactively so you will always see the curves as they are developed.
This is a very powerful graphics tool which requires some experimentation to fully master. The following brief guide illustrates the power available through the use of Bezier curves. To produce a Bezier curve:
• Select the Bezier tool, and move the pointer to the location of
the first point.
• Press the left mouse button and drag out a line to the second
point, and release the button.
• Move the pointer to the third location, and press the left
mouse but ton again. While holding down the left mouse button,
move the pointer to the location of the fourth point.
ComicSetter will display the location of the 3rd point while
you drag the pointer.
• When you release the button, the curve will be generated in the
object.
2 3 Continuing Beziers: A standard Bezier curve is composed of four points, but it is possible to draw a continuous curve which is built from a number of Beziers placed end-to-end. In this situation, the first point of the new bezier is the same as the last point of the old one and the second point of the new Bezier is automatically chosen so that the two Bezier join together smoothly. ComicSetter performs this automatically, while the additional curves are generated. To continue a Bezier:
• Hold down the CTRL key while generating the last two points of
a Bezier as previously described. When you release the left
mouse button to place the fourth point, the Bezier you have
just completeo will be drawn as usual. In addition, the first
two points of a new Bezier will be placed automatically.
• Place the third and fourth points of the new Bezier as
described above. If, while you do this, you keep CTRL
depressed, you will have yet another half-completed Bezier at
the end. You can link a total of 30 Bezier together this way.
Constraining Beziers: Hold down the SHIFT key to constrain either of a Bezier curve’s tangent lines to 45 degree increments. You may constrain the first and last line segments of the Bezier curve, while freely placing the middle segment.
Line Width Toil The Line Width selector is meaningful for all of the structured graphics tools. Select the line width before creating a graphic. If an existing structured graphic object is selected, and the line width altered, that graphic will reflect this change. Structured graphics can be edited in this way at any time.
Colur Colour can be selected prior to creating a graphic, or afterwards to modify a structured graphic. The foreground colour selector affects every structured graphics tool.
If the background colour is set to a colour or pattern then the Continuous Line, Rectangle, Ellipse, and Bezier tools will fill their areas with this selection. For example: if the background colour is red, and the foreground colour is black, using the Box tool will produce a solid red rectangle with a black border. Experiment with these tools.
They can produce some surprising results.
The background colour can be turned off by selecting the No Fill tool. This allows graphics to be created without any fill. The foreground colour can not be turned off, but setting the line-width to 0 can achieve similar effects.
A Pattern Fill can be chosen instead of a background colour, and operates similarly.
Modifying structured graphics: Structured graphics are moved in the same manner as are panels or bitmap objects. Simply use the left mouse buttoh to grab the object and move it to the desired location.
Control Points Structured graphics can be fully edited in size and shape. When a structured object is selected, control points will be visible surrounding the graphic. Any of these control points may be grabbed and moved to change the shape of the graphic.
D Scaling Structured Graphics Holding L-ALT while an object is selected will cause eight control points to appear around the object’s frame. Grabbing and moving control points while still holding L-ALT, will scale the entire object to a new size. This procedure was discussed in detail in Chapter 8: Graphics; Scaling.
Box and Ellipse These structured graphics have eight control points, one at each comer of the frame, and one at the midpoint of each line. Grabbing any of these control points and moving it is similar to re-sizing a panel. When a control point is moved, the graphic itself will resize, showing you exactly how it is being changed.
Lines Control points in continuous lines are located at each joint of the line.
If only one line segment exists, there will be a control point at each end of the line. Grabbing any of the continuous-line control points will allow you to move the location of that point while all other points remain stationary.
Bezier Curves Bezier curves possess the most advanced form of control point manipulation.
Initially, only two control points are visible in a standard, non- continuous Bezier curve.
These two points will be at the ends of the curve.
Clicking on either of the control points will display a tangent line and another control point at the end of the tangent line. The direction of the tangent line defines the direction of the curve at the control point where the curve meets the tangent line. The length of the tangent line defines the magnitude, or degree of curvature to that segment.
To change the location of the second control point, or the length of the tangent line, grab the control point at the end of the tangent line, and move it to the desired location. Moving the original control point, at the base of the tangent line, will keep the secondary point, at the end of the tangent, anchored. If you wish to move the whole tangent line, without changing either its direction or its length, hold the Left-Amiga key while moving the original control point. The entire tangent line will move at once.
Continuous Beziers When you click on one of the control points connecting two Beziers, you get a tangent line extending in both directions, with a new control point at each end. In this situation, each tangent line can be edited independently as previously described.
If the Left-Amiga key is held down, the changes in one tangent will be reflected in the other. For example: by holding down the Left- Amiga key and changing the length and rotating the tangent by 45 degrees, the other tangent will also change in length by the same amount, and rotate 45 degree in the opposite direction. The rotation is always around the base control point. If the Left-Amiga key is held while moving the the centre control point, all three points will move together. This has the effect of keeping the curve smooth as in (a). If the tangents are moved independently, as in (b), a
curve with sharp points may result.
The only way to completely understand the full use of Bezier curves is to experiment. By moving the control points, it will only take you a few minutes to learn the basis on which Bezier curves operate.
Attributes Structured graphics are objects, just like bitmap and text objects.
All of the attributes discussed in the Chapter 8: Graphics, fully apply to Structured graphics.
Text can be added to ComicSetter layouts in two ways. The first is by integrating text with bitmap objects. The second way is to create text as a separate object. The advantage of creating separate text objects is the ability to edit that text at a later time. If text is integrated as part of a bitmap, it is a permanent addition.
Text in Bitmaps To place text in a bitmap object:
• Select the bitmap object and make certain that the Graphics
Mode tool is set to the bitmap mode.
• Select the Text Tool from the tool palette. The pointer will
change to a cross hair signifying that the location for the
text can be defined.
• Drag out a rectangular guide, defining the text location.
ComicSetter will produce an Enter Text requester.
• Type the text into the text line and press Return. The text
will appear as part of the bitmap.
Text as an Ibjeet To create text in a separate object:
• Make certain that the Graphics Mode tool is set to Structured
Graphics.
• Select the Text tool from the tool palette. Again, the Entw
Text: 1 ... .. 1 1 OK 1 Cancel |
pointer will change to a cross-hair. ComicSetter is waiting for
an object to be created, into which the text will be placed.
• Drag out a text area. As in the bitmap mode, ComicSetter will
present you with an Enter Text: requester.
• Type the text into the text line and press RETURN. ComicSetter
will create an object and place the text within. The location
of the text within the rectangle you drag out depends on the
Text Format specified, whether you’re adding the text to a
bitmap, or creating a text object. For an explanation of text
formats, see Formats later in this chapter.
Modifying Text Objects Text located in bitmaps can not be directly modified. However, text in text objects can be altered.
The size of the object can be modified in the same way as other objects:
• With the object selected, grab any of the control points around
its frame and drag it to the new size. The text inside will
readjust accordingly.
Although you are changing the physical size of the object, you cannot change the size of the text. To do this, you must select a different font, or font size. See Fonts, later in this chapter.
Changing the Actual Text To edit the text in a text object: With the text object active, choose Text Edit.. The familiar Enter Text requester will appear, allowing you to edit the existing type.
Text Attributes Many text attributes may be selected, including the font used, style of text, and the text format. All of these attribute items are located in the Text menu.
Fonts Selecting Text Font... produces a Fonts requester. This requester allows you to change to a different font type:
• Move the pointer over the desired font and click the left mouse
button. Most fonts have multiple sizes listed on the far
right-hand side of the requester.
• Select the proper size.
Style Each font can have various styles assigned to it; Underlined, Bold, and Italics. Any combination of styles can be selected simultaneously.
These styles apply to the entire text object; unless overridden by embedded bodes (see below).
• Select Text Style and choose the attributes that you wish your
text to have. When an attribute is selected, a checkmark will
appear to the left of it.
• To turn off all style attributes, select Text Style Plain.
Formats Text can be positioned within Text objects in three ways: Left, Right, and Centre justified.
Select Text Format and choose the format that you wish your text to have. Only one of these may be chosen at a time for any given Text object. A checkmark will appear to the left of the chosen format.
Eubedded Codes You can add codes directly into your text. Most of these codes control the various text styles, such as Bold, Underline, and Italic, overriding the styles chosen from the Text Style submenu. The codes themselves will not be displayed or printed.
Insert these codes while entering text in the Enter Text requester, when you want to have a single text object containing more than one style of text.
Code Function Effect YB Turn BOLD on BOLD b Turn Bold off U Turn Underline on UNDERLINE u Turn Underline off I Turn Italics on ITALIC i Turn italics off n New Line p Turn off all styles. PLAIN A VV character is displayed Several of these codes may be used in conjunction with one another.
For example, if you entered: Hello Bthere b, Bob ComicSetter would produce: Hello there, Bob Colour Text will always appear in the current foreground colour. If the text is a Text object, then the colour can be changed by the same method as for changing colour of a structured graphic. Background colour is not used in Text objects.
With the text object selected, change the foreground colour. The text colour will change accordingly.
Object Attributes A Text object behaves as all other objects do and can be further modified using the Alter Current... selection as described in Chapter 8: Graphics.
BALLOONS Speech balloons add a special dimension to our favourite comic characters. There are several different types of speech balloons. Some are rounded (used when characters are talking), and others are jagged (showing force or a strong action).
ComicSetter provides the ability to create several different types of speech balloons in various sizes, place text within them, and drag out speech tails. Since speech balloons are specialised structured graphics, the tail, or any other part of the graphic can be edited. The text element is a text object grouped to the structured graphic.
Creating tie Balloon
• Click on the Balloon Tool. The pointer will change into a
cross-hair.
• Drag out a frame for the size of the speech balloon.
• ComicSetter will present an Enter Text requester. Enter the
text in the text line. The speech balloon will be created using
current line width, colour and balloon attributes.
Balloon Attrilntes Balloon attributes must be set before creating the balloon. Other than colour, line width and text contents, there is no method of changing attributes after the balloon is created.
To select balloon attributes:
• Double click on the Balloon tool in the tool palette.
ComicSetter will present a Balloon requester containing
optional settings.
Balloon Shapes Peaks 36 6 ]£ I OK Cancelt Shapes: ComicSetter provides six different balloon shapes, all of which are editable. Clicking on any of the shape diagrams will select that shape.
Features: Certain balloons can be selected to have Even or Jagged peaks. When Even is selected, all of the peaks will be of equal size. When Jagged is selected, some peaks will be higher than others.
The Peak counter indicates the number of peaks and control points that your balloon will have. The default value depends on the shape of balloon that you are using.
The Peak height controls the height of the peaks above the “valleys” between them. Any value between 0 and 100 is allowed. Using a peak height of 0 will result in an ellipse being generated with the number of control points that were specified on the Peaks line.
Editing the Ballonn A balloon is really a group containing two components: a text object and a structured object. In a standard speech balloon, the text object is within the structured object. To modify the balloon or the text, the group must be entered and the appropriate component must be made active. For more information on groups, see the Chapter 14: Groups.
Only a brief summary is given here.
To select either of the objects in a balloon:
• Click on the balloon to select it. The two objects in the
balloon will become visible (if Preferences Show Boxes is
turned on).
• Hold down the CTRL key while clicking on one of the two
objects.
That object will become active. Once a balloon is entered, you can simply click on the object that you wish to edit. The frame of that object will turn from dotted to dashed and control points will become visible.
Structured Cunpunent: Adding a tail The graphic part of a balloon is simply a structured graphic with many segments - either a continuous line or a Bezier curve. Any editing that is possible with a normal structured graphics is possible with the balloon. Adding a tail has been simplified to grabbing and moving any control point to its desired location, dragging out a speech tail. As with normal Bezier curves, clicking on any control point will bring up the tangent lines for finer control of the graphic.
Text Cimpineiit: Editing Once a balloon is entered, selecting its text object will allow it to be edited just like any other text object. Therefore, by grabbing the visible control points, you can adjust the size of the object. Choose Text Edit to edit the actual text. For more information on Text objects, see Chapter 11: Text.
Other Attributes A speech balloon’s Colour and Line Width attributes can be chosen before the balloon is created, and modified afterwards. These features work the same way as with other graphic objects. For more information on Colour and Line Width attributes, see Chapter 8: Graphics.
In the same way, a balloon’s text attributes can be chosen, before or after creating the balloon, using the Text menu.
T •• EDITING ComicSetter provides many tools to assist in object editing. One of the most useful tools is the UNDO command. Other commands allow you to move, duplicate, and delete panels and objects.
Undo Selecting Edit Undo reverses the immediately previous change or delete that you might have invoked. This applies to panels, and all types of objects. Pages are excluded from the Undo features.
Some operations cannot be undone. If the most recent operation is not undoable, the Edit Undo menu will be ghosted out to indicate this.
Cut Selecting Edit Cut will remove the selected objects or panels from the screen, placing them in the Paste Buffer. The Paste Buffer is a temporary storage area for panels and objects. The contents of this buffer can be recalled at any time. Therefore, you can Cut an object from one page and Paste it onto another page. Cut cannot be undone with Undo - Paste is the only way to reverse the effects of a Cut. Once an object or panel has been cut, it remains in the paste buffer until Cut or Copy is selected again.
Copy Edit Copy is similar to Cut, except that the selected panels or objects will not be erased from the screen. The Edit Copy selections transfers a copy of the object or panel into the Paste Buffer without effecting the original. This command is used in conjunction with the Paste command.
Paste Selecting Edit Paste, after a Cut or Copy command, will transfer the objects or panels in the Paste Buffer back onto the original locations on the current page. For example, a panel Cut from the top portion of one page will Paste into the same location on the current page. It is possible to Paste an item several times, onto the same page or different pages.
Each new copy will be placed on top of the original object. You are then free to move the copies to new locations.
Note: When ComicSetter Pastes an object or panel, it will make that item active. In the case of a panel, the panel will be active even if there are several objects in the panel. If you select the Paste item again, ComicSetter will produce an error message. The reason for this is that you would be trying to paste an object into an object, or a panel into a panel, and this is not possible. You can, however, paste an object into a panel. A Paste command will copy an object from the Paste Buffer into the current panel, regardless of the panels position on the page.
Erase Selecting Edit Erase permanently deletes the selected objects or panels from the ComicSetter layout. This allows you to delete objects without affecting the object or panel in the Paste Buffer.
Duplicate The Edit Duplicate selection is convenient for creating several copies of objects or panels. Simply select the object or panel that you wish to recreate and select the Duplicate function. ComicSetter will place the second copy slightly below and to the right of the original, so that it may be easily grabbed and moved. The Duplicate command will not affect any objects or panels in the Paste Buffer.
After a Duplicate, the new copies of the items will be active, rather than the originals. The copies can therefore be moved together to a new location, by grabbing one of them while holding down the L-SHIFT key.
Flip The Edit Flip selection allows you to create mirror images of active objects or panels. This incredibly useful feature greatly multiplies the ComicSetter Clip-art options.
When you select Edit Flip, a sub-menu of two choices will appear:
• Horizontal: ComicSetter will flip the contents from left to
right, resulting in a mirror image.
• Vertical: This will flip the contents from top to bottom,
resulting in an upside down image. Lock Selecting Layout Lock
will protect the active panels or objects from any further
changes. A locked object can not be moved or modified in any
way. If a panel or group is locked, all of the objects it
contains will also be locked.
Unlock Selecting Layout Unlock will unlock the selected object or panel, allowing you once again to move, modify, or delete it.
Align This command aligns all of the selected items, either relative to each other or relative to the panel or group which contains them. It is possible to align items horizontally or vertically, or both at the same time. In the horizontal direction, if you choose Left (or Right), the items will move so that their left (or right) edges all line up. If you choose Centre, the items will move so that they are all centered on the same vertical line. Vertical alignment works similarly, aligning the items’ top or bottom edges, or centring the items on the same horizontal line.
To align a set of objects or panels:
• Select all of the items that you wish to align. See Chapter 7:
Panels, for more information on selection.
• Select Layout Align.... ComicSetter will present an Align
requester.
• Choose the desired alignment options.
Aligning tn Parent: There are two basic ways to align items. These are controlled with the To Parent option in the Align requester.
If To Parent is chosen, all of the items will be aligned relative to their parent item. They will move to the edge of the parent’s frame, or will be centered within it, depending on the options you choose in the Vertical and Horizontal sections of the requester. It is possible to align just one item To Parent. The parent of an object is the group or panel of which it is a member. This is also the parent of a group. All of the panels on a page have the same parent - the page itself.
If To Parent is not chosen, ComicSetter will align relative to a frame which just surrounds all of the selected items. Thus, if you align Left, the program will find the leftmost of all the selected items, and will move the rest of the items to line up with it. Right, Top, and Bottom work similarly. If you centre-align without choosing To Parent, the program will choose, from among the selected items, the left edge which is farthest left, and the right edge which is farthest right; it will then move each of the selected items so that its centre is half-way between those two edges. Although
possible, it is useless to align just one item without To Parent - every item is already aligned relative to itself.
GROUPS The purpose of a group is to join several objects together, allowing you to move and modify all of them at once. For example: grouping a graphic character created from several pieces offers the obvious advantage of moving the complete character as a whole, without moving all of the pieces separately and reassembling them. Note: objects and groups can be grouped; panels cannot.
Creating
• Select all of the objects that you wish to include in the
group. The objects must all be from the same panel. For more
information on the methods of selecting and extended selecting
objects, see Chapter 8: Graphics.
• Once all of the objects to be grouped have been selected, use
the Layout Group Operation Group function to make the selected
objects into a group. A frame surrounding all of the selected
objects will appear. The borders of the individual objects will
change from dashed (selected) to dotted (deselected).
When the group is not selected, the borders of the individual objects in the group will disappear, and only the group border will be visible.
Selecting, Mnving and Scaling Once a group has been created, it acts just like any other object. It can be selected, moved, and scaled using the methods described for objects in Chapter 8: Graphics. When a group is moved or scaled, all of its members will move or scale along with it. It is never necessary (or possible) to explicitly resize a group. Whenever a group’s member are changed, the group’s frame will automatically be adjusted to exactly contain them.
Altering Selecting Alter Current... will produce the Group Attributes requester.
This requester allows you to exactly specify:
• Position: The group relative to the panel.
• Scaling: The horizontal and vertical scaling factors that will
be applied to the group.
Ungreiping To ungroup a selected group of objects, select Layout Group Operations Ungroup. The group’s members will still exist, but they will no longer be in a group. They will all be selected, making it easy to deselect a couple (using L-Amiga-Click) and regroup the rest.
Entering a Grnup There are times when it is necessary to modify one object within a group. To enter a selected group and gain access to its individual members:
• Hold down the CTRL key while clicking the pointer over the mem
ber to be made active. The object will become active, allowing
full access. Once a group has been entered all of the objects
within that group are accessible by clicking on them. Extended
selection is also possible at this point.
If an object within a group is modified, the group frame will readjust to accommodate the change.
If the group contains a sub-group, enter the group and then use the same procedure to enter the sub-group.
To leave a group, just click anywhere other than in any of the group’s members. The group’s members will no longer be individually selectable.
Risplay Boxes To turn the display of borders on or off, select Preferences Show Boxes. A checkmark will appear to the left of the menu item if item is turned on.
The only borders displayed will be those of the current active objects, and their corresponding panels.Tuming on Preferences Show Boxes causes all objects and panels to be displayed with borders around them. These borders may be dashed, solid, or dotted depending on the current state of the object.
Gadgets There are situations where maximum screen viewing area is desired, especially when editing very large panels. ComicSetter provides the option of making the tool palette disappear, increasing your viewing area by about 10%. To turn the tool palette display off, select Preferences Show Gadgets.
Fast Move ComicSetter has a method for moving objects very quickly. By default, Preferences Fast Move is selected. This setting allows objects to be moved quickly, by only displaying the frame of the object being moved. When Fast Move is turned on, a checkmark will appear to the left of the menu item.
When the Fast Move option is turned off, the contents of the moving object will be visible providing for accurate positioning. The disadvantage of this is that ComicSetter may take a second longer to prepare the object to be moved.
Interlace Selecting Preferences Interlace will double the ComicSetter screen resolution allowing you to view twice as many vertical lines. The disadvantage of the interlace mode is the “flicker” effect which occurs on most monitors. A high-persistence monitor will help to eliminate this flicker.
Page Cade Turning on Page Caching allows work on very large documents without placing a great strain on the Amiga’s memory availability. With Page Cache on, ComicSetter will temporarily store most pages of your document on disk. Only the current page will be in memory. The disadvantage of Page Caching is that it may take a few extra seconds to move from one page to another. The advantage gained is a comic whose size is only limited by available disk space.
Selecting Preferences Page Cache produces a sub-menu containing two items:
• Use Page Cache is a switch to turn the feature on or off.
• Set Directory... displays a Page Cache Directory requester
which is used to select the disk and directory in which
ComicSetter will store the non-current pages.
Available Meniry Selecting Preferences Available Memory... displays an Available Memory requester. This requester shows you the total free memory currently at the Amiga’s disposal:
• Chip: This value shows the total free amount of Chip memory.
• Fast: If any memory boards are attached to the Amiga, this
value shows the total amount of Fast memory available.
• Chip Largest and Fast Largest: These show for the two types of
memory, the size of the single largest available chunk of
memory of that type.
IB [¦viroiHHt Setap Before it is possible to print any comics, the Amiga must be informed of the type of printer is connected to it, using the Preferences program.
This can be done any time before Project Print... is selected, either before starting ComicSetter or while it is running. If Preferences is run while the Print requester is active, any changes made will not take effect until the next time you select Project Print.... Print Selecting Project Print will produce a Print Document requester, providing the necessary options for printing the document:
• From Pages X to Y: allows a range of pages to be selected for
printing. By default, ComicSetter will print the entire
document. Cl irk in the page lines to specify the range of
pages to be printed.
• Copies: ComicSetter will print this many copies of each of
the requested pages. The default number of copies is 1.
• Dflt: In this setting, ComicSetter will scale the page as
required to make it fit on the physical page in the printer.
• Custom: gives you control over scaling factors that are applied
during printing. A 1.0 by 1.0 scale instructs ComicSetter to
print every pixel with no scaling . Depending on these values,
the output may be larger or smaller than the page on your
printer. If it is larger, only part of the page will actually
be printed.
• Density: Depending on the selected printer, several print
densities may be available for use. Click the pointer over the
appropriate density to select it. The DPI value will display
the actual dots per inch for the chosen density.
• Colour: The colour setting tells ComicSetter to print comics in
their original ComicSetter colours. The colour quality depends
greatly on the type of colour printer connected to the Amiga.
This setting should not be used with a Black & White printer.
• Grey Scale: If this setting is used, ComicSetter will convert
all colours into appropriate grey shading that your printer can
output.
The grey shades are created by different patterns of black dots which give the appearance of a solid grey colour, a technique used in news paper photographs. The type of Dithering pattern is selected using the Dither setting gadgets in this requester.
• Black & White: Printing in Black & White will force all colours
to be either black or white - no grey-scaling will be
attempted. A colour comic may not output satisfactorily when
printed in Black & White mode. In Black & White printing, there
is a threshold, any colour darker than the threshold will be
printed as black; the rest of the pixels will be white.
Although this threshold cannot be changed within ComicSetter,
you can change it using WorkBench Preferences.
• Dither: ComicSetter provides three settings for grey scale
patterns:
• Ordered: Which creates bits with uniform placement of light and
dark pixels.
• Halftone: which creates bits with dark or light pixels
radiating from a central point. This emulates the dots of a
newspaper’s halftone photograph.
• Floyd-Steinberg: which creates bits with a randomised placement
of dark and light pixels. Experimentation is the best way to
determine which of these settings produces the best quality
output on your printer.
• Smooth: If any upward scaling is performed, the Smooth function
helps ComicSetter to smooth out some of the jagged edges common
to dot matrix printers. The degree of improvement depends on
the printer and the amount of scaling. Smooth cannot be used
together with Floyd-Steinberg dithering. Selecting either of
these turns off the other one.
• Correct: This functions helps ComicSetter to more closely match
the printed colours to the screen colours. Of course, this is
only applicable when using a colour printer.
• Manual: This feature allows single manual sheet feeding to the
printer. ComicSetter will wait after each page for any key to
be pressed, before continuing with the next page.
• Eject: When using this option, ComicSetter will eject the last
page of your comic from the printer.
• Start: Clicking on this gadget will instruct ComicSetter to
start printing using the selected attributes.
• Pause: This gadget can only be activated while ComicSetter is
printing. Selecting Pause instructs ComicSetter to
temporarily stop printing until either Resume or Cancel! Is
chosen.
• Resume: This selection will start printing after it has been
stopped by Pause.
• Cancel! Will abort the printing operation, returning you to
ComicSetter.
• Quit: Clicking on this gadget will abort from the Print
Document requester, returning you to ComicSetter.
Environnent Setup There are times when ComicSetter must produce either a comic which looks good on the screen, or one which looks good when printed - it can’t do both at the same time. For example, when you use L-SHIFT with the Ellipse tool to draw a circle, what you see on the screen is very unlikely to be circular; it will, however, appear circular when printed.
In order to do this correctly, the program must know, while you are creating a comic, the resolution of the printer on which it will be output.
When ComicSetter first starts up, it checks the printer settings you specified to the Preferences program, on the assumption that they describe the printer you will be using to output your comics.
If you plan to use a different printer than the one in your Preferences (for example, if you’re working at home, but plan to use a friend’s colour printer for your final output), you should tell ComicSetter about this so that it can get things right. To do this:
• Select the Project Environment Setup... menu item. An
Environment Setup requester will appear.
• Enter the resolution (dots per inch, or “DPI”) for the printer
you will be using for your final output. If you create a comic
with the wrong printer resolution, everything will still work
OK, but the final output won’t look quite as good as if the
correct resolution had been used.
If, when the program starts up, the printer information is not available, the settings for a common type of printer (an Epson) will be used, and you will told about it so you can change the settings to the correct ones for your printer.
COMIC Comics have been a part of popular Western Culture for well over fifty years. From the first comic books, which reprinted daily newspaper strips on poor-quality newsprint in black and white, to the slick full-colour graphic novel format of today, this art-form has remained a part of our daily lives.
Along the way, comics have defined their own language - a vocabulary which relies, not only on the traditional understanding of text, but also on the reader’s visual experience. Comparisons may be drawn here to movies and television programs, which have a similar vocabulary. In fact, very few movies or TV shows, if any, make it to the production stage without storyboards, which are nothing more than comic book representations of the feature.
Panels and Ballnms The comic book format represents an interplay of word and image, two distinct forms that have a common origin. It is through the manipulation of these elements, in the form of sequential image panels and word balloons, that we may tell a story. The panel and the balloon are the basics of a comic book vocabulary.
The panel, besides being a way to frame an image, is the device comic books use to indicate time. Panel shape and size has a lot to do with the way the reader will interpret the passage of time.
For example, a series of small panels can indicate a very quick time span, while a single large panel may translate as the slow movement of time.
Therefore, the panel not only defines the parameters of the action it encloses, but also establishes the reader in relation to the scene, and indicates the duration of the event. But remember, it is not only the panel itself that expresses elapsed time, but the melding of images, symbols and word balloons within the frame. You can almost think of panels as literary punctuation. Some panels may act as commas between sentences, while others may be semicolons or periods.
Balloons, which are used to contain speech and sound, may also be used to indicate time.
A good comic book must also have a sense of rhythm. In fact, timing and rhythm go hand-in-hand. Think of a series of small, thin panels as a staccato beat, leading up to a large-panel crescendo, which in turn becomes a simple harmony of evenly-shaped panels. A comic page can be like music for the eyes.
Of course, the tone of the panel rhythm will be affected by the actions they contain. For example, panels of a lady applying makeup denotes a certain time rhythm based on common experience. Other possible scenes that would help communicate a believable meter of time are such things as a dripping faucet, starting a car, or smoking a cigarette. Using these devices in a comic book will allows the reader to sense the passage of time based on his own experience; after all, nearly everybody knows how long it takes to start a car or smoke a cigarette.
Painting Devices Besides giving us a way to express time and rhythm, panels also act as a frame for ideas, thoughts, actions, and scenes. The artist must think in a sequential fashion to properly communicate the story. Because you can illustrate only so much of a story, the skill is in choosing which snapshots to preserve from the continuous flow of events. If the artist has done her job properly, the reader will have no problem in imagining the events between the key panels the artist has decided to depict.
It is important for the comic book artist to control the reader’s attention. While it is impossible for the artist to stop the reader from going to the last panel on a page before reading the first, there are devices the artist can use that will help in leading the reader’s eye, and therefore in directing the flow of the story. These are simply called pointing devices.
Research has found that when people look at a page, the eye usually enters at the left side near the top. Undoubtedly this is because readers have always started to read from that comer on a page and the eye has formed the habit of looking there the minute it glances at a sheet of paper. Panel arrangements on the page assume this.
From this point, it has been found, the eye leaps to the centre of the page, just above the middle (in graphic design this area is known as the focal point) and then, unless held by something interesting, it passes downward and to the right, passing off the page.
Nevertheless, the reader must return to the conventional pattern if he is to read the story fully. There are, however ‘rules of thumb’ that help to keep the reader’s eye directed in the proper manner. For instance, the artist should keep figures, faces, or objects in the outer panels pointed towards the next panel in the sequence. If this is not possible because of the story-line, other devices such as shadows or background design should be incorporated to this end.
Conposing the Paiel Each panel is like a miniature illustration, and as a result, all the rules of composition and design apply. It is up to the artist to decide what perspective the Using a full figure, and changing the panel size, you can achieve a variety of depths:
1. Full figure
2. Medium shot
3. Close-up Note that a small close-up panel as shown can be used
as an INSERT panel in a larger panel.
Reader will be looking at, the action that occurs, and what elements will be necessary for the narration of the story.
The artist usually has a choice of three basic depths in representing the action in a panel.
They are the close-up, the medium shot, and the full figure or long shot. It using these various depths intelligently helps in the pictorial rhythm and flow of the story. To do a story as all close-ups, or all long shots, would result in a very tedious and boring comic book, although such repetition can be used to advantage in newspaper comic-strips, where the whole of the narration takes place in three or four panels.
There may also be occasions where the artist will find it necessary not to enclose the action in a panel, or to use the panel border as an indicator of a doorway or window. These creative uses of the panel border are only limited by the artist’s imagination.
Tips os Utilising CLIP-ART With ComicSetter,there is a broad range of clip-art available to help you in the creation of a comic book. This clip-art, some of which is on CU Amiga’s coverdisk is presented as Figures, Backgrounds, and Props.
In the use of this clip-art, it is not always necessary, or desirable to use the full background or figure as provided. One picture may provide you with a number of different backgrounds when con- stricted to small panels. A full figure may be also used in a variety of ways. Some examples are shown above.
It is also not always essential to have a full background in a panel.
Some panels will work very well with no background, just characters, and other panels may require just a few props. You may require no more than a portion of a window and a doorway to indicate to the reader that your characters are in a room.
The figures have also been given a very generic look. This was done to leave room for you to individualise them yourself. For example, you could add a moustache, beard, or eye-patch to the character and thereby create a wholly new character. Hair and skin colour may also be changed, giving you the option of using characters from other races.
In Closing Comic books are an exciting and popular medium, and as a result, have been embraced by people the world over. In France, Italy and Spain, comics have become just as valid an art-form as painting or sculpture.
In Japan, comics are a multi-million dollar business where the creators enjoy the same fame as rock and roll stars in North America. In China and Russia, comic books have been used for years as educational tools.
It seems that anywhere you go, you’re bound to run into comic books in one form or another. People always have something to express, a story to tell. The problem has been that some people have more trouble than others in telling their story. With ComicSetter, the obstacles have been removed - you have in your hands an easy and fun way to express your thoughts and ideas, to tell that joke, to rekindle those memories ... even if you can’t draw a straight line!
APPENDIX A Keyboard Sbortcits Many of the gadget and menu functions can be accessed using keyboard shortcuts. The following list contains all the menu items and sub- items which have shortcuts. Note that the same convention followed in the rest of the manual is followed here: Ax means to hold the right Amiga Key down and press key “x” Project Menu Project New AN Project Open AO Project Save AS Edit Menu Edit Undo AQ Edit Cut AX Edit Copy AC Edit Paste AP Edit Duplicate AD Edit Flip Horizontal AH Edi t Fl ip V ertic al A V Edit Select All A A Layout Menu Layout Group Operations Group AG
Layout Group Operations UnGroup AU Layout Add Page AT Layout Lock AL Preferences Menu Preferences Magnify 200% A 1 Preferences Magnify 100% A 2 Preference s Magnify Fullpage A3 Preference s Magnify 50% A 4 Preferences Snap to Grid AR Preferences Show Gadgets AM Preferences Interlace A J Text Menu Text Edit Text Font... AE AW Keyboard Modifiers The following chart summarises the keyboard modifiers, and the mode « in which each operation functions.
To use a desired function, press the specified Modifier key while clicking in the appropriate area with the left mouse button.
The Edit column (below) is in effect when a keyboard modifier is used for an editing operation, ie. Clicking or grabbing any visible control point.
The Selection column (below) is in effect when a keyboard modifier is used in a selection process, such as clicking inside the body of an object.
Modifier Selection Edit (none) Select Single Object Left-Shift Extend Select Object Constrain Right-Shift Extend Select Panel Constrain Left-Amiga Deselect Object Move Tangent point with points Right-Amiga Deselect Panel Move Tangent point with points Left-ALT Scale Panels or Objects Right-ALT Select Single Panel CTRL Descend into group Close Polygon Continue Bezier In the Edit column, there is no difference between the left and right Shift keys, or between the left and right Amiga keys.
APPENDIX B
1. 3 Printer Information ComicSetter comes with Workbench 1.3
version of the printer drivers and printing system software.
This version provides greatly improved printing speed,
selectable printer resolution, and optional smoothing on high
resolution printouts. This software also offers a large number
of user adjustable options to control the printout, such as
different types of colour conversion (dithering), forced
integer scaling, optional screen to printer colour correction,
and a number of ways of specifying limits on the final
printout size. All of these options are controlled by the
Amiga Preferences program.
Since ComicSetter needs a great deal of control over the appearance of the final printout, most of these options are either ignored or overridden by ComicSetter. For example, when you check the Smooth option in ComicSetter’s printer requester you are overriding the Antialiasing setting in Amiga Preferences.
There are, however, a few settings in Amiga Preferences that ComicSetter does not control, and you must set them up properly. They are: Printer Name and port, narrow or wide printer. The following sections describe how to set up these settings.
Printer Name and Port You need to specify to ComicSetter the name of the printer you are using, and whether to use the parallel or serial port for communication with this printer. When you set the printer name what you are really doing is selecting a printer driver from the ones provided by Commodore. If you are using a printer that is not one of the ones listed, and is not compatible with any of them either, you must obtain a printer driver specifically written for your printer.
• Double click on the Preferences icon in the System disk.
• When the Preferences window is displayed, click on the Printer
button. The printer setup window will be displayed.
• At the top right of the printer setup window is a list of
printers. Click on the up and down arrows next to this list
until the name of the printer you are using is in the centre of
the list (in the orange container). If your printer is not
listed, check to see if your printer is compatible with any
of the printers listed (many printers are Epson compatible),
if so then use that printer setting. See the printer driver
listing later in this appendix for a list of what printer
driver to use for various printers.

• To the left of the list of printers are icons for using the
serial or parallel ports. Click on the parallel icon if your
printer is connected to the Amiga’s parallel port, or click on
the serial icon if your printer is connected to the Amiga’s
serial port.
• Click the OK button in the lower right comer. The main
Preferences window will be displayed.
• Click on the Save button in the lower right comer to save these
Preferences settings.
Narrow or Wide Printer Many printers are available in both narrow (8 inch) and wide (13.56 inch) carriage version, and several of Commodore’s printer drivers are designed to be used with either type of these printers. However, you must tell the printer driver what type of printer you are using.
• Double click on the Preferences icon in the System disk.
• When the Preferences window is displayed, click on the Printer
button. The printer setup window will be displayed.
• If you are using a narrow carriage printer, click on either
U.S. letter or Narrow Tractor in the paper Size section. If you
are using a wide carriage printer, click on Wide Tractor in the
Paper Size section.
• Click on the OK button in the lower right comer. The main
Preferences window will be displayed.
• Click on the Save button to save these Preferences settings.
Print Density Most graphics capable printers can use several different resolutions when printing graphics. New with the version 1.3 printer drivers and printing system software is the ability to control the print density (or print resolution) of the printout. Although setting a higher resolution * will slow down the printing, you can potentially obtain much nicer results, especially when you choose the Smooth option in ComicSetter’s Print requester. If your printer supports multiple graphics printing resolutions (and if the printer driver also supports multiple resolutions), you should try
each of the different resolutions to see the effects, both in quality and printing speed. Then choose the one that you prefer as your normal setting.
Print Density is controlled from within ComicSetter’s Print requester, thus there is no need tq set it in Amiga’s Preferences.
Printer Specific Information Below is a list of the graphics capable printer drivers supplied by Commodore at the time this manual went to press, along with information about what printer that driver supports, whether it supports wide carriage version of the printer, and what printer resolutions the Print Density option sets.
CalComp ColorMaster CalComp ColorMaster2 These two drivers are identical except that the ColorMaster2 driver is approximately twice as fast, requires considerably more memory (up to about 1.2 megabytes for a full page printout). No special features.
CBM MPS1000 For Commodore’s MPS1000 printer and all IBM compatible printers.
Wide carriage version are supported. Two densities are supported: 120 by 72 DPI, and 240 by 72 DPI.
Diablo C-150 For the Diablo C-150 and compatible printers. No special features.
EpsonQ For both black & white and colour version of the Epson LQ and LQ compatible printers. Uses 24 pin graphics mode. Wide carriage version are supported. Four densities are supported: 90 by 180 DPI, 120 by 180 DPI, 180 by 180 DPI, and 360 by 180 DPI.
EpsonX For both black & white and colour versions of the Epson EX, FX, JX, LX, MX, RX, and compatible printers. Wide carriage version are supported. Two densities are supported: 120 by 72 DPI, and 240 by 72 DPI.
HP LaserJet For the LaserJet, LaserJet Plus, LaserJet Series II, and compatible printers. Four densities are supported: 75 by 75 DPI, 100 by 100 DPI, 150 by 150 DPI, 300 by 300 DPI.HP PaintJetFor the HP PaintJet printer. No special provisions.ImageWriterII For the Apple ImageWriter II printer. Seven densities are supported: 80 by 72 DPI, 96 by 72 DPI, 107 by 72 DPI, 120 by 72 DPI, 136 by 72 DPI, 144 by 72 DPI, and 160 by 72 DPI.
Okidata 2931 For both the Okidata 292 and 293 with IBM interface modules. Use 16 pin graphics mode. Wide carriage version are supported. Two densities are supported: 120 by 144 DPI, 240 by 144 DPI.
Okidata 92 For the Okidata 92 printer and Okidata 292 and 293 with Standard interface module. No special features.
Okidata 20 For the Okimate 20 printer. No special features.
Xerox 4020 For the Xerox 4020 and compatible printers. This driver is identical to the driver for the Diablo C-150 except it prints all black dots twice in order to produce much more solid and darker black shades. If you don’t want this feature then use the Diablo C-150 driver. No special features.
Additional Notes Some Epson and Epson compatible (and IBM compatible) printers have poor line spacing. If you notice tiny white lines between each horizontal strip of eight dots, try selecting a paper type of Single.
APPENDIX G Graphic Clip-Art Listiaps « The following pages contain a graphic listing of the type of clip art available for ComicSetter. You will notice that all the bodies are supplied in many parts, allowing you to mix and match to suit the particular comic layout you are devising. Because of size limitations on the cover disk we have been unable to supply a complete collection of clip art, however we will add to this over the next few months. In the meantime, check out the comic creation feature in the January 1995 issue of CU Amiga and find out how to create your own clip art and
illustrations.
FEMALE MED & CLISE HP FEMALE CLOSE UP FEMALE MED ON THE MOVE FEMALE MED ACTION FEMALE MED POSES AND PARTS % sp V:i l%| » J MALE MED & CLOSEUP 4* MALi CLOSEUP HELMET MALE MED SPACESUII MALE MED SITTING STANDING MALE MED TOPS 0 HOTTOMS MALE SMALL MED » CIOSEUP & BKGDS INTERIOR-HALI RKGDS INTERIORTECH RKGDS INTERIDR-APT BKGDS CITYSCAPE1 BKGDS CITYSCAPE2 £¦ ¦.% i?$ 0% :¦-¦¦ ¦'• ,;.¦• ¦» V.:•: -:.w. ,'v.''' fe v .W.'-i ' : ;:-.:".3¥J: B "1 BKGDS CITYSCAPE3 BKGDS CIIYSCAPE4 BKGDS BRICKWALL BKGDS SPACE1 BKGDS SPACE2 BKGDS SRYLINE PROPS EXPLOSION B WINDOW PROPS CRITTERS B BUILDINGS PROPS SYMBOLS
STARS » STUFF PROPS THE DOORS PROPS STARSHIPS CURIST PROPS EXPLOSION & PICS PROPS STARSHIPS WEDGE PROPS SOUND EFFECTS PROPS SOUND EFFECTS 2 PROPS SOUND EFFECTS 3 Copyright Information Glossary Index APPENDIX D Emap Images has licenced this program and manual from Gold Disk Inc. for use with the January 1995 issue of CU Amiga. All of Gold Disk’s rights remain intact and you, as the user, are still bound by the terms and agreements which originally pertained to ComicSetter as distributed by Gold Disk Inc. These are listed below. If you have any problems with the disk please return it to the
address listed in the CU Amiga coverdisk pages, and not to Gold Disk Inc. See magazine for full details.
1. COPYRIGHT: THE PROGRAM AND ITS RELATED DOCUMENTATION ARE
COPYRIGHTED. YOU MAY NOT USE, COPY, MODIFY, OR TRANSFER THE
PROGRAM OR DOCUMENTATION, OR ANY COPY EXCEPT AS EXPRESSLY
PROVIDED IN THIS AGREEMENT.
2. LICENSE: You have the non-exclusive right to use the enclosed
program only on a single computer. You may physically transfer
the program from one computer to another provided that the
program is used on only one computer at a time. You may not
electronically transfer the program from one computer to
another over a network.
You may not distribute copies of the program or accompanying documentation to others. You may not modify or translate the program or documentation.
3. BACK-UP: You may make one (1) copy of the program solely for
back-up purpose. You must reproduce and include the copyright
notice on the back-up copy.
4. TERMS: This license is effective until terminated. You may
terminate it by destroying the program and documentation and
all copies thereof. This license will also terminate if you
fail to comply with any term or condition of this Agreement.
You agree upon such termination to destroy all copies of the
program and documentation.
5. PROGRAM DISCLAIMER: THE PROGRAM IS PROVIDED “AS * IS” WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING,
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE ENTIRE RISK AS TO
THE RESULTS AND PERFORMANCE OF THE PROGRAM IS ASSUMED BY YOU.
SHOULD THE PROGRAM PROVE DEFECTIVE, YOU (AND NOT GOLD DISK
INC. OR ITS DEALERS) ASSUME THE ENTIRE COST OF ALL NECESSARY
SERVICING, REPAIR OR CORRECTION. FURTHER, GOLD DISK INC. DOES
NOT WARRANT, GUARANTEE OR MAKE ANY REPRESENTATIONS REGARDING
THE USE OF, OR THE RESULTS OF THE USE OF, THE PROGRAM IN TERMS
OF CORRECTNESS, ACCURACY, RELIABILITY, CURRENTNESS, OR
OTHERWISE; AND YOU RELY ON THE PROGRAM AND RESULTS SOLELY AT
YOUR OWN RISK.
6. DISKETTE LIMITED WARRANTY: GOLD DISK INC. WARRANTS TO THE
ORIGINAL LICENSEE THAT THE DISKETTE(S) ON WHICH THE PROGRAM IS
RECORDED SHALL BE FREE FROM DEFECTS IN MATERIAL AND
WORKMANSHIP ONLY FOR A PERIOD OF THIRTY (30) DAYS FROM THE
DATE OF ORIGINAL PURCHASE. IF A DEFECT COVERED BY THIS WAR
RANTY OCCURS DURING THIS 30-DAY WARRANTY PERIOD, AND IT IS
RETURNED TO THE DEALER FROM WHOM IT WAS PURCHASED NOT LATER
THAN FIVE(5) DAYS AFTER THE END OF SUCH 30-DAY PERIOD, THE
DEALER SHALL, AT THE DEALER’S OPTION, EITHER REPAIR OR REPLACE
THE DISKETTE. THIS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER EXPRESS OR
STATUTORY WARRANTIES, AND THE DURATION OF ANY IMPLIED
WARRANTY, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTIBIL- ITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, IS
HEREBY LIMITED TO SAID THIRTY (30) DAY PERIOD. GOLD DISK’S
LIABILITY IS LIMITED SOLELY TO THE REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OF
THE DEFECTIVE PRODUCT, IN ITS SOLE DISCRETION, AND SHALL NOT
IN ANY EVENT INCLUDE DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF USE OR LOSS OF
ANTICIPATED COSTS, EXPENSES OR DAMAGES, INCLUDING WITHOUT
LIMITATION ANY DATA OR INFORMATION WHICH MAY BE LOST OR
RENDERED INACCURATE, EVEN IF GOLD DISK INC. HAS BEEN ADVISED
OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
Some states provinces do not allow a limitation on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the above limitation may not apply to you. Some states provinces do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you. This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state province to state province.
7. MISCELLANEOUS: This license agreement shall be governed by the
laws of the province of Ontario, Canada.
GLOSSARY active panel & object The current panel or object, on which all modify operations are performed.
Background colour See fill colour.
Back-up To copy disks and files for safekeeping.
Bezier curve A mathematically defined smooth curve.
Bit An abbreviation for “Binary digit”. Groups of bits are used to represent characters and other information. The most common grouping is the “byte” (8 bits).
Bitmapped graphic A graphic created with pixel representation.
Bold Letters with heavier blacker appearance than normal.
Cache A temporary storage area on disk where the computer stores unused pages to save memory.
Carriage return Often referred to as the RETURN key.
Centre-justified text Text centered on the full line, with the left and right margins both ragged.
CLI The AmigaDos command-driven interface.
Click To press and release the left mouse button.
Crop To trim a graphic to a reduced size by hiding part of the image.
Directory Used to organise files on disks in much the same manner as paper files are organised in file folders.
Document The comic currently being worked on within ComicSetter.
DPI Dots per inch. Used to specify the output resolution of a printer.
Drag To move objects on the screen using the mouse. Depress the left mouse button over the object, and then move the mouse while the button is still pressed.
File requester A way of accessing files and directories on the screen.
Filename The name you select for saving and retrieving a ComicSetter document.
Fill colour The colour used as the background when a fill is requested.
Fill pattern A pattern used to fill objects in a drawing or box frame.
Font A complete set of characters of one type size, type style, and typeface.
Foreground colour See line colour.
Function key A key labelled with an F followed by a number. These keys activate certain functions.
Gadgets The icons within a requester, window, or screen that are used to change the display or to access a tool.
Grid A set of non-printed lines similar to graph paper, used as a guide for page layout.
Group A collection of objects.
Halftone A continuous gray tone simulated by a pattern of pixels.
Handles Small rectangles which can be dragged to change the size or shape of an object or panel.
Hard disk drive A hardware device attached to the Amiga with more storage than a floppy disk drive.
Icon A pictorial representation of a tool, document, or gadget.
Interlace mode A video display mode giving 400 lines and a headache.
Italic Text modified to slant to the right.
Justification The way text is formatted on a line. Text can be centered-, left-, or right-justified.
Left-justified text Text with a straight left margin and a ragged right.
Line colour The colour in which all graphics and text will appear.
Line weight The thickness of lines used in structured graphics and some bitmapped functions.
Manual feed Paper put into a printer by hand.
Margin The blank area surrounding the printed matter on a page.
Menu bar The strip of menu headings at the top of the screen. It is accessed by pressing the right mouse button.
Object A single graphic or text element. Objects can be bitmapped, structured, or text.
Panel A rectangular area on the page. Every object must belong to a panel; usually, the only part of an object which is visible is the part within the object’s panel.
Paste buffer A temporary data storage area used by ComicSetter to hold items which have been Cut or Copied.
Pixel The abbreviation for “picture element”: the smallest item of display information on the screen (one dot).
Pointer The moving object on the screen, controlled by the mouse, used to select items, icons, and gadgets. Will change in shape depending on the operation in progress.
Requester A form which appears on the screen, requesting information which the program needs in order to complete an operation.
Resolution The number of horizontal and vertical lines in the screen and printer.
Right-justified text Text with a straight right margin and a ragged left.
Scaling Changing the size of an image proportionally.
Screen The physical display area of the Amiga monitor.
Scroll bar The gadgets located to the right and bottom of the screen, used to see different parts of a large page.
Select 1. To invoke a menu option. 2. To activate one or more panels, groups, or objects.
Sizing gadget The gadget, located in the lower right comer some windows, that you can drag to change the window’s size.
Submenu The additional menu that appears below and to the right side of a menu item.
Tool A facility for working with the onscreen display.
Typeface A particular combination of type family, style and weight.
Workbench The icon-based user interface on the Amiga.
Airbrush tool 55 align 75 Alter Menu 16 autopanel 38 back-ups 14 background patterns 48 Balloon Create too 27 balloons 69 attributes 69 creating 30, 69 hints 85 modifying 31, 71 moving 31 tails 71 Bezier tool 55,61 Bitmap Graphic mode 17, 44 bitmaps 43 flipping 75 importing 27,51 modifying 53 operations 53-58 saving as IFF 57 Box tool 54, 60 clipart 50, 88, 100 colour palette7, 47, 57, 62, 68, 72 contents of the package 11 conventions of the manual 12 coordinates 15 cut and paste 73 display 79 document closing 34 loading 24, 33 multiple 34 saving 23, 34 document name 15 Document Menu 16 Edit
Menu 16 editing 73 Ellipse tool 54, 60 file requester 23,24 Fill tool 55 flips 75 graphic clipping window 52 grids 41,42 group 77 creating 77 moving 78 scaling 78 selecting 77 Group Create tool 17 Hand Move tool 17 importing bitmaps 27 Interlace mode 80 keyboard equivalents 19, 93 keyboard modifiers 19, 93 Layout Menu 16 left justified text 122 license agreement 117 Line tool 53, 59 line width tool 17, 47, 57, 62, 72 locking objects 75 magnification 25 memory indicators 80 Null Pointer tool 17 object 44 attributes 44 cropping 45 moving 29, 45 scaling 45 page caching 80 page number gadget 18
pages creating 22, 35 deleting 36 moving 36 selecting 36 Paint tool 53 Panel Create tool 17 panels attributes 39, 40 creating 25, 37 definition 24, 37 deleting 39 hints 85 moving 26, 39 selecting 26, 38 sizing 39 pointer shapes 19 Preferences Menu 16 printer environment 20, 95 printing 32,81 output resolution 81 Project Menu 16 registration 11 Scroll Bar 18 Send-to-back Send-to-front 17 Smear tool 55 snap-to-grid 42 starting ComicSetter 14 structured graphics 43,59 attributes 64 control points 63 scaling 63 structured graphics mode 17,44 suggestions for ComicSetter 85 system requirements 12
technical support 91 text 65 attributes 67 colour 68 embedded codes 67 in bitmaps 65 modifying 66 Text Menu 16 Text tool 17 title bar 15 upgrades 11 undo 73 units of measurement 35 I We hope you enjoy ComicSetter. Used on your Amiga with a printer and a modem, this program will allow your imagination to reach out and touch other people, impress them and, if you’re good at it, make them laugh.
For more information on creating comics, invitations and cards see the January 1995 issue of CU Amiga which contains a feature on the subject.
... GET GOING!
THE COMP

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Merci pour votre aide à l'agrandissement d'Amigaland.com !


Thanks for you help to extend Amigaland.com !
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