Sponsors

FacebookTwitterGoogle Bookmarks

Gateway 2000 responded the next day by issuing a press release to the effect that it disputed any daims by Rightiming Electronics about owning a licence to produce Amiga technology. 'We dispute rts feense, rts right to se any l cense ond we dispute ony c a ms It has mode with respect to Amiga patents, copyrights, or frodemor rs. Gofewoy 2000 owns ail Amiga patents, copyrights and frademar rs worfd-wlde and wl l continue to Icense Amiga fechno ogy to guall red companies", said Gateway's press release. MediaSoft, the UK publisher of Amiga Review, has announced that it is to split the magazine into two individ- ual parts to fully cover the various aspects of the Amiga. Amiga Review will be focused largely on hardware and 'seri- ous' applications, with Amiga Gamer being geared towards the Amiga games market. Amiga Review wil! Be halved to El.60, while Gamer will be sold for E1.50. People who took out a subscription to Amiga Review will receive both magazines for no extra charge. Both magazines wilt be only available through mail order. The spilt has come about because of the resurgence of interest in the Amiga computer platform and the increased number of games that are being developed and produced. Readers can send orders by sending chèques or postal orders to MediaSoft Magazines

Click image to download PDF

Document sans nom IN*' Sfc 4
- fm .
SifejS One day we all hope to see the rebirth of the Amiga with a PowerPC processor and other new features to enable it to compete again with today's systems. Sadly though, more than 2 years since Commodore’s demise, little of substance has actually happened. eYe seen , prototypes and heard promises... we all hope to see new Amiga develo; Only Apple offer you both desktop and portable computers that truly match the ease of use the Amiga brought to your desktop. Affordable Apple Macintosh systems have PowerPC RISC processors with thousands of off-the-shelf programs available in areas where
the Amiga was always previously so strong.
And, if you need the most compatible of all computers, Macintosh is currently the only system that can run MacOS, DOS and Windows applications via optional DOS Cards or SoftWindows softwa re.
It you cani wail and need more perforrffice today, without paying the earth - there’s one real alternative to consider... There’s never been a letter time to think Apple!
PowerMac 5400 180
• PowerPC 603?
• IBOMhz
* 16Md RAM
* 2Gb Hard Dr-ve
* SspettKD
• 15* Integral Colour Monitor
* 28 8dpi Modem
• Des»gn Keyboard
* fa'Tv Software*
* * PowerPC 603?
: *20QMhz a *ia.bPAM J 2Gb Hard Dnw CD a'HMiSync Notour Mow
* Design Keyboard
* FREE internet Connection tot ... conpfisng of bp Integrated
cc&Kbonoi Appte'aftfi!
PowerPC 603e 275Mhz 32 Mb RAM 4Gb fisd Ehstt 12 5t«dCD 15'AVMtMyrc Colour Monitor Vdec- 8 TV Text fitodem Design Keyboard
* C'«yve' Software ONLY,.. J * T t T just *6:75 Pet .Wfesk*
* CREATIVE STUD© SOFTWARE INCLUDES..
* t£ fcxftm?listed ten! M the Tas% Pack*' PLUS XTRASPOFTWARE....
• Kal's Power Goo * Avid Cinema • Cubase AV * Dabbler ? Adobe
PageMiil • Adobe PhotoDeluxe • 3D World ? ClickArt • Aciua
Soccer 'FAMILY PACK SOFTWARE INCLUDES™ ONLY...
• Grata Myfcneda Encytfcpaeoa * Dcs Utimate ftuman Body • Sawy*
Soence House V p rty software reeded to torms ¦ Thmkm* Things 3
• Fuh Throttle • PcwerPete * Toe Best oS European Soccer f
dsectfy o the Internet easily'
* Claris ’At* I s * HyperCard Player • Acrobat Reader * MactirA
ffe * At Ease ¦ Perfect sofolion for Mac users
• Apple Internet Connection fct * Apo'e Telecom 3.0 PIUS KTRA
SOFTWARE-. • Appt Vteg*c Software Cotaixxi try Otsney and •
Descen: want Internet acres? Today!
rc-s modem for er Week* SHOWN BELOW IS JUST A SMALL SELEC TtON FROM THE HUGE RANGE OF POWERSOOK MACINTOSH COMPUTERS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE 1400cs 117 12 1000, DS £1350 : 1400CS S17 I6 10GQ, OS, CD £1585 : 1400cs H7 16 1000. DS. CD. Stater 2200. Carry Ca e £1761 ; 1400cfl33 16 1300. AM, CD D583 ; j 3400dl80 16 1300. AM £2936 : 3400C 180 16 1300, AM. 12 Swed CD. Ethernet £3171 | iAWk 200 ill2000, AM. 12 Spd CD, Emerrct, SoftWindows 3 11 £4111 : 3A0Oc 24O 16 3000, AM. 12 Speed CD, Ethernet £4699 : SHOWN BELOW 15 JUST A SMALL SELECTION : OF NEWTON HANDHELD MESSAGEPAD PRODUCTS ACCESSORIES AVAILABLE.
Newton 2000 Mess age Pad 8Mt, Backer kieer. £763 Newton 2000 Carry Case £34 : Newton 2000 Carry Case with room fo-r Keyboard f76 !
Newton 2000 AC Adapts £34 ; Newton 2000 Battery Pace £23 ' Newton 2000 4Mb Flas* Upyade £105 ; Newton 2000 Keyboard £75 S ALL current Newton models available along with their accompanying peripherals and software titles ¦ CALL U5 software PLUS Cl*r:s Impact and Claris Organiser* * SHOWN BELOW 15 JUST A SMALL SELECTION FROM THE VAST RANGE OF APPLE MACINTOSH COMPUTERS WHICH ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE... TV in! Vdec
* X ? ?
X x PK» ' £999 £1820 £1292 £1938 £2525 £1280 £1643 £2407 £2819 JcfMrN!?¦»»- I um.fKi !
; Mmty FAC*.
• KCME OfFCt j | HOMiOfTCt : CSUN! J1UOO X X X X Ay© X X X X ?
X X X X Modem K tconJ ?283 Des ?33.6 Desiign ?283 ‘Dew ?33.6 Doan ?•3 6 tWyi X Deajn X Utarefcd X hterded X ExIefuKd Mode* PM 5400 PM5500 Batof PM 6400 PM 6500 PM 6 SOO PM 4400 PM7300 PM8600 PM9500 IV hteqral y tnegri IVAVWS IS' AV Mrs IS'AVWS 15* W5 FAMILY PACK software is as detailed above (set- 5 00 180 offer) * C EATivF STUDIO software s as detailed above (see
• Please send the coupon or phone us - well rush you your
Mr Mrs Miss Ms: j Initial(s): Surname: Address: i
- -!
County or Country: Postcode: Daytime Phone: Evening Phone:
- J ' Main use(s) of computer: HOME BUSINESS ) EDUCATION!_
Current computer and accessories:
- -=--- Please cut out the coupon atul return it FREE to...
GORDON HARWOOD COMPUTERS • FREEPOST MID04091 • Dept. CUA • NEW
STREET • ALFRETON • DERBYSHIRE • DE55 9BR Tel: 01773 836781 •
Fax: 01773 831040 • e-mail: info@ghc.co.uk
• Why Macintosh?
Performance: The Internet & Communication: v All Macs are PowerPC based. Even entry level desktop systems run at I6OMH2 or 180MHz, with 275MHz powerhouses and 200 Mhz multi-processor systems at the top of the range. Even portables offer 240MHz’ p Apple is the only mainstream computer company Kl~ " ho hits Ix'en able to make the transition from the (rider CISC (complex instruction set computing) processors to the newer and faster
• All Macs are Internet ready; many include a 28.8 or 33-6 modem
with full send receive fax and answerphone management
facilities. 1
• Industry standard web browsers. Netscape t - «jr Navigator and
Microsoft Internet Explorer.
Were developed for the Mac. Both give full access to all Web sites with new Internet page layout ugt K* 9, features like auto-tables and on-screen movies.
!t • The Internet's standard format for video files, called QuickTime, or QuickTime for Windows, are both Apple products. Of course QuickTime comes as tandard with every' Mac, 1982-1997 We’ve been providing Commodore products since 1982 and today supply a range of 100% Motorola based systems including Blizzard and Cyberstorm along with video products and other peripherals... RISC (reduced instruction set computing) processor technology' - whilst still retaining full backward compatibility with previous software.
Remember 486, Pentium Pro & 680X0 are merely CISC!
Connectivity & Expandability: Over 1,800 native software packages (written specially for PowerPC Processor Macs) have been shipped since Power Macs were launched in 1994 - plus there are thousands of existing programs which can also be used.
Industry standard programs such as Word.
Pagestream, Word Perfect, Page FileMaker Pro, Excel. Quark Xpress, Photoshop and many others have all been developed for die Mac.
• .All Macintoshes have networking built in as standard, so
connecting systems together and adding shared printers etc,
couldn't be easier.
* All Macintoshes have an external SCSI connector as standard -
adding external drives, cartridge drives, scanners etc really
is Plug-and-Play.
• Low-cast digital cameras can be plugged into the Mac for
inslant real image input
* Inexpensive industry standard PCI cards can be used in all
desktop Mac systems.
Creativity: 00 Education & Edutainment: Macintosh still dominates the.
World with an 80% market share in colour publishing.
65% of post-production video editing is on Macs Macintosh is (he most widely used system for the creation of Internet web pages.
Most magazines (probably the one youVe reading right now) are created on Macintosh. ,r Many quality Macintosh titles are widely available.
Dorling Kindersley offer superb titles like The Ultimate Human Body and History of the World whilst Microsoft publish Encana, Cinemania and Dinosaurs.
Because Macintosh is the preferred system within many educational establishments, high quality softw are Is assured.
Multimedia: Apple Is die World's No. 1 Multimedia PC vendor.
All desktop Macs have a fast CD-ROMdrive as standard (many portables have internal Cds too).
In 1995, 42 of the top 50 selling CD-ROM tides worldwide were developed on the Macintosh.
Many Macintoshes have built-in TV with teletext so TV clips can be recorded directly to disk as QuickTime movies.
Many Macintoshes have built-in video in and out. For direct recording to VCRs.
Several Macintoshes have internal digital video editing facilities as standard and many others can be upgraded to include this facility with ease.
Top games like The Ultimate Doom, Myst, Rebel Assault II, Dark Forces, Descent, Afterlife, Lost Eden, Legend of Kyrandia. Full Throttle and The Dig have all been developed for Macintosh.
Output & Presentation; Connecting and using colour printers (from Epson. HP. Apple and others) to Macs is so easy and the results are truly outstanding.
Many software packages are available offering image manipulation and superb photo quality,omput.
aii MONITORS... GRAPHICS TABLET... 4 Apple 15' AV MuhiSync £351 Wacom ArtPad li with Dabbler £116
- + Apple 17* 1705 TC0 MuftiSync £469 ¦* Appe 17' 17I0AV TCO
MuTSync £645 STORAGE... Apple 20* MuhiSyncS £1056 D2 Quantum
2,1 Gb Ldsma! WJ £293 EZ230 SyQuest Drve me Cart £163 LASER
PRINTERS... D2 JAZ Drive inc Cartridge £351 App’e Lasawmer
M600P5 - A4.600dpi £586 D2 2400e 16 Speed CD Dra* £234 HP
LaserJet 6MF - A4,600dpi £727 Mcw«2400E CO D £234 * Apple
UsertVr a I2io40f5 ¦ A4.600dpi £939 Iwtti 5 great software
tides) ; INKJET PRINTERS... CQMMS... I Apple StyteWmer 1500 A4
Cck jt £116 Global Village TelePoninternet £135 Appe StyteWnter
25® A4 Coiou?
£175 (33,5. Me Global Transfer sAvare) ; Canon BJC 4550 A3 Colour £352 Epson Stylus 600 A4 Col&ur £269 ACCESSORIES... * Epson Stylus 800 A4 Colour £387 Apple Design Speakers I: £58 ; Epson Stylus Photo 6 Colour £410 Macaliy Joystxk £38 Epson Stylus 1520 A2Colour £704 Macaly Gamepad £26 Fight St ck Pro Joystick £80 ; CAMERAS... Grars Frebird Joystck £100 * Apf e Qu-ckTake 2® £445 Jeutci £45 ; Kodak DC20 £187 App? One Year On-Site £18 Marterance Weranty j SCANNER... j UMAX Astra 6005 -PhooShopLE £206 LOTS MORE PERIPHERALS- CALL!
; BUSINESS Flm'CE: Weekly finance prices are exclnsnv of VAT and are based on J war fixed cost Apple Commercial Credit Lease for business users PERSO.SAL FINANCE: Finance is also et a liable for tndivfduah visiting our sbouwoms and payvig a minimum of 10% deposit.
There's mm ct. .
'Deferred Payment Plan'
• Us easy to buy your Mac with a GH Personal Finance Option
• Ask for details of one to suit you
• Example... Pay KRS Deposit on a balance over £1200 and then pay
nothing for 4 months (subject to status and £18 arrangement
fee),
• Wntien details are available on request GWWCS SomvUL.
Qwrt Xpes 3 3 fcstrrtd J 0 L PtoteSh»i$ few
* " T| Air St* !*: Fay 3 j tvt&l*; BUSWtSi- MctschOft: Mcsch
Ary-J63 ; Class Wes* Inter C V to OtficeO'g CtenfaOiteJO Cl*M
Ojjrmt 2fl VY06(4cwftl6. 3 MtWAfcttOCCOTS'i '3$ 4 D-CD UTILITY
SOFTWARE... Woron 3 5 I SOFTWARE., Certify Oranri Tbeift&y
Th .js Wort. 25 t' Cjc JlhsUrevrrf bSrja&Sieetcn
Usrj&eHijranBitty 2D Yrt£feii*r-CiUcS, Dccuu- k JH o irth
C'jfj' Erci&eti&ofkvrcf 20 Waft Itfamot Ate Ttrf* 4Td TjA
Gsft-'. Iaiis, Sprah »fwnh S€re!,a.2«ri two rowset CftiAs toast
C«rnrai UrrKtn Thingi 3 IctSUKE 50TIWAIL.
Agta Soc«.’ Sa4:ifs2D00C£IC(i«!iOft Jtenki &jr£xxxl Wftwr-aiO OJ 01 01 01 01 01 01 OS £S2u Eit Ibual For your protection nil Cards are fully Security Checked OFFICIAL ORDERS... We supply Central. Loral Government and Education Departments along with Major PLCs 'FA5T-FAX'... on D17Z3 831040 for a Rapid Response to your Quotation or Order Requirements!
¦Why Harwoods?- AT GH WE MAKE EVERYTHING EASY... PHONE GH.. Ws wens a njju owtirv. ;m wen SC YIUNSACTKM Sl«trtfKiS ORDERING BY POST OR FAX... F*asrti *. tore. Adsets j.- 5 pteVayysiy-roiwfer shine » ia nynfcer ter. Yvr erjrere-is t ung fsj d&ttedt Oft its smber £XraiidfjQrVew (7 Istai'afe cMmri&pf S«*T.ste;he3j« (iHair 7 Gefi tieantxtl, Drrtj v PO i wtbk to Gordon Kuwood Computers Lmud GH PRICES.., wIKwcuumen. «r*tty&t*itr*su J iranallr.?%iod [rb IK (JwrtM Armed Fwus Noon* net it Wfl* VAT - p tue e-i fcr Set*l s DELIVERY... W* c ff pryrps torn wits My (mrt npms wUffj optar* mojpoj the i*.
Eyrow srd t&dm* 1.1 pcriisj cost d crdernj by r-ji, Cii» sr*m the *preeriKfctotgr- GH WARRANTY.- UartdKum- tenisn wxrxoB *&-, cr,» jcoJ GH1 &-wm edendcd cetera Onh a?
To*ncvnitSei is snksxrei j*n to n,w« asSt *»r. *me. Onis v-.
AU PRICES InaUOEVAT «3«Sw. Lc stvni usw cn.y SA fis jsn owo t* iy VC ieVve trd, Gorilon Uir.Mn.vl CanpufcYS founded as a specialiit Commodore dealer in 1932 ind wercitili supporting Ainiga ust-s today tTe began supplying Macintosh ahenitbeamedcarthatCommcxJon.- teas failing to apfixin die technological advanu if lad. 'Ec needed to have produos available (hit fulfilled th: nmkof our customers who were demanding..
• SjTflems a future
• Systems with outstanding performance "
• Systems wtth unsuipaswd ease of use ¦ Systems without the
probkms and dsadvantagts associated with DOS Windows, w hich
«iU persist and trouble uses even now.
Today we hast grawn fe twccroe one of the larges Apple Aadtorised Resdkrs ic Eurcpe, Our caoensfve product knowledge and sc&i iuf oo fyjpjft crrtphi'i'c our sums as ore (4 a sdea group of Apple Authorised Service Cam and accredited Apple Higher and fuitha Education Alliance Rescflers GH GORDON HARWOOD COMPUTERS dept.CmRI* new street ALFRETON • DERBYSHIRE DESS 7BP Tel: 01773 836781 FAX: 01773 831040 AN EASY DRIVE FROM MOST AREAS, We're open Mon to Sat - 9.00am until 5.00pm A£A$ t call to cowiru availas-uty before making ALONG JOURNEY TOW US.
Tlo 0±te.zjmixi is t i iHmrtj* » mw, rnan ainidl.QQodiartmrmpfivlmaimlbam Al iriHXtkjm art tubjed to Hmsxl l Tmv and Ccnft'dw rjf.Ur a iCp lf*ixl u a hhie m rtrfi** All TraJemris err ££0£ EVIEWS Action news 52 I'm sure there is some games news this month, exactly what I cannot say.
Perhaps turning to page 52 might help Civilisation 54 Hugh is a man in control of his own destiny, now whether he should be in control of anyone else's is another question Live media interview 56 Last month's we had news on a company bringing Mac games to the Amiga, now we probe the developers Shadow of the 3rd moon 60 Bloody hell, that heading only just fits in.
Why can't they give games proper names anymore, no matter how good it looks Big red adventure 62 Part two of part one, crack this great adventure with Amiga Actions continuing solution type guide thing Duke 3d 64 Duke Nuke 'Em on the Amiga surely not!
Well no, but being able to walk around any Duke level is a damn good start in my book Mini office Has Guildhall over stretched itself by stepping into the world of serious software with this latest re-release of Eurosoft's Mini Office?
New york Just what the Amiga world needs right now, a brand new newsgroup reader, joy and rapture EATURES Browser war It's time to stand up and be counted, Amiga Computing takes the latest three versions of iBrowse, Voyager and Aweb to see which on comes out on top Art effect_2 Neil Mohr gets all arty which makes a change because he is normally he is just farty. This latest version get put through the mangier until all the nasty bits show up m Sasg After being around for three years and a year on-line, the standard Amiga software group provided virtually every possible form of software
ordering under the sun Gunship 2000 65 Now I'm sure there will be mention of Hugh's big chopper at some point, so there I got it out the way right at the start, ooh err misses, f nar f'nar, nudge nudge Six sense 66 A brand new game! Can you believe it, those crazy East Europeans they must be on drugs Postscript.
Have ever wanted to display or print off a Postscript document? Well now you can, and for next to nothing to boot WlNTEL WORLD.
Dave Cusick is not generally known for being an aggressive type, but this month he's kicking arse with his size tens HE COVERDISK Magnum opus 2 The ultimate add-on for Directory Opus 5 users. Every file type, icon and backdrop you would ever need is in this massive collection Action Cow - Have your own cow, mooooooo Big Red Adventure - Complete solution MountDOS - Mount PC hard drives MUILoad - Preloads all your MUI libraries Includes: WaitGUl - GUI replacement for the wait command Super83 - Top Super72 replacement VisualPrefs - Configure Workbench's looks Multiview - Multi-filetype viewer
front end ftfckRf ftKumF Mbrkbtitth Matf frnv «gjItem Opus SS ieiPtfK¦ T-’t:' r' rm r, » • iriTrMs - *¦' mt T.ru ssv*r& r&«!!-Sf7rir?!* ialwre 'tin*!**.
R* ¦ urn; Hi hrew*d ** t ISSK jn-‘m'SB'jrrwtlff'CTlM'SBfs r-ninrr .**»¦ rrws toSfitn. Ifir.fsn tit ShlHwtU That's all folks!
Time and tide wait for no man, and sadly Amiga Computing must pass on, to a better place. Enjoy the final issue as we walk off towards the light pub... EGULARS News ?
Controversy! Gateway 2000 is disputing the sale of Amiga patents to a Far East company by another company, read all about it here Esp_ A final look back over letters from the last nine years of Amiga Computing, but not the one from that American nutter woman Acas Top 10 tips for a better computing life, you won't find better anywhere else MIGA GUIDE Public sector Sniff, Dave Cusick has been getting all teary eyed in the final Public Sector ever, waaaaah Back issues Missed out on an issue of Amiga Computing?
Him to page 32 AMGA tf t *.r«niI »?;*¦ i t: i• f ut w"-t DVSifal Artist
A. rif4 »*ic Mb "c *rt roaeiRnq COMPUTING
* o*c' M iV J(*-|a Amiga Computing o OM M ENT This is the end...
After over nine years in publication, AMIGA Computing bows out
t's kind of odd, here I am, two years to the day that I started
working on Amiga Computing. From lowly cover disk editor to
editor to ex-editor in under 18 months. It seems a little
ironic that at a time where there is more optimism and
possibilities for positive change in the Amiga world that Amiga
Computing should close.
As I write, the PowerPC boards are just beginning to ship. They have yet to prove themselves, but at least they should provide a stop gap until a true PowerPC machine can be developed.
To me, the Amiga story is littered with missed opportunities and broken promises. Even today, with the Amiga owned by such a large and powerful company as Gateway 2000, no one can be completely sure as to what will happen next.
The only way the Amiga is going to make it back as a mass-market machine is with a lot of commitment and financial backing. So far, for all the good intentions and comforting words we have yet to see any positive moves by Gateway 2000 in regard to Amiga International.
I was saying only two months ago that we should be patient and not expect anything incredible in the near future, but where are the hardware and software engineers? I think Amiga International may find it difficult to write a new operating system with just the tea lady.
Once upon a time the Amiga industry was populated by visionaries, individuals with great ideas and incredible expertise. Over the last few years, due to a variety of factors such as declining software sales, the rise of the PC and most importantly the almost complete lack of continuity and strategy in Amiga hardware sales and development, these visionaries have for the most part left the scene.
If this is the end of the road for the Amiga, it is a sad fate to befall such a once-magnificent machine; but it seems hard to imagine the situation improving in the immediate future unless Gateway 2000 can pull something truly exceptional out of its well- resourced hat.
I would like to thank all our readers for their loyal support over the years. Even though Amiga Computing may not have been the best selling magazine, it has managed to cover a broad range of subjects and has brought you interviews with the likes of Aardman Animations and the creators of Babylon 5, not to mention in- depth reviews and features.
I would like to thank everyone 1 have worked with on the magazine, I've had a lot of fun and learned a lot from you all. For the last few weeks there has been a steady flow of e- mail from people saying how much they will miss Amiga Computing, and it is good to know that, in some small way, we've been able to touch so many people's lives. My arse we have.
AJMoC Neil Mohr Editor The AC team EDITOR Neil Mohr ART EDITOR Graham Parry PRODUCTION EDITOR Justine Bowden NEWS EDITOR Hugh Poynton REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS Dave Cusick Paul Overaa ADVERTISING MANAGER Elaine Prescott AD SALES Sue Horsefield AD PRODUCTION Barbara Newall AD TYPESETTERS Malcolm Thorley Eddie Burke MARKETING MANAGER Steve Tagger PRODUCTION MANAGER Alan Capper ADMEN MANAGER Joanne Clifford CIRCULATION DIRECTOR David Wren MANAGING DIRECTOR Ian Bloomfield DISTRIBUTION COMAG (01895) 444GSS SUBSCRIPTION 0151-357 2941 “you’re a slave to money, and then you die ” Published by IDG Media.
Media House, Adlingtor Park.
Macclesfield SKI04NP TefcOlttS 878888. Fax:01625 879966 Emad contacts: Editorial: edst@acofnp.demon.co.uk Advertising: affc@acomp.demon.cauk http: www%c0.uk amigac0mp We regret AMIGA Computing cannot offer technical help on i personal basis either by phone or in wrrting.All reader enquries should be submitted to the address in this panel.
Amiga Computing is on independent publication and AMIGA Technologies is not responsirfe for any of the articles in this issue or for arty of the opinions expressed ©1997 IDG Media. No material may be reproduced in whole or in part without written per- mission.While every care is taken, the publishers cannot be held legally reponsible for any errors in articles, listings or advertisements.
All prices listed in the editorial content of this magazine are inclusive of VAT unless stated 12 issue subscription £49.99 (UK), £69.99 (EEC) £84.99 (World) Ongoing quarterly direct debit £10.99 (UK only) Printed by Spottiswoode, Colchester, Essex US yearly subscription rate: USA Gold $ 70, USA Standard $ 40 For nine years Amiga Computing has been the leading magazine for Amiga enthusiasts. Amiga Computing promises to inform, educate and entertain its readers each month with the most dedicated coverage of the Amiga available Amiga Computing £4.95 £9.95 £10.95 £29.95 External Floppy Drive for
all Amigas ..£39.95 Internal Floppy Drive A500 5(X)+ .£28.00 Internal Floppy Drive A600 1200+ Internal Floppy Drive A1500 2000.
.£28.00 .£28.00 HARD DRIVES + BUDDHA CONTROLLER FOR A1500 A3000 A4000 ..Please Ring IDE 2.5” Hard Drives IDE 2.5” Hard drives come formatted and installed with Workbench. Cable, screws, software and instructions supplied, (please ring for availability) 80Mb ...£69.00 340Mb ......£109.00 120Mb .£79.00 420Mb ......£119.00 170Mb .£79.00 540Mb ......£129.00 250Mb .£89.00 Catweasel for A1200 - allows you to connect High Density Disk Drives £55.00 Catweasel for A1500 2000 4000 £55.00
Buddha IDE Controller for A1500 2000 4000 .£55.00 Catweasel plus Buddha for A1500 2000 4000 .£79.00 Oktagon 2008 SCSI controller ...£99.00 Multiface III .£79.00 PCMCIA Controller for CD Rom for A1200.. £69.00 Specially made hardware and software* Allows 4 ATAPI devices, ie, 2 IDE hard disk & 2 IDE CD Rom to Amiga 4000 internal IDE controller, through Atfapower on Amiga 500 500+, comes with full IDE Fix software £59.00 Replacement Mice ... MegaMouse
400 MegaMouse Plus (3 Button) ..... Optical Mice . New Golden Image TrackBall £19.95 Pen Mouse ,£12.95 (ideal for CAD) New Black Mouse for Amigas ...£9.95 RAM CARDS A1200 A1200 with clock and 4Mb (not upgradeable)..149.00 A1200 with clock and 8Mb .£65-00 A1200 with clock, 8Mb & 33Mhz FPU .£80.00 33Mhz FPU inc. crystal .£15.00 (Successfully launched at World "of Amiga Show '97) Buffered Interface for A1200 with IDEfix'97 software
allows to connect 4 ATAP1 devices to A1200 ..£59-95 New Gl-Quatro Buffered Interface for A1200 New AlfaQuatro Interface Joysticks & Joypads Vjjjjjjbi us EjdJiI fulsimi A'jJiiJd jjj TuUiJiri: yBpSiSinj li£)£)7' Best pricing on CD ROM Drives & Hard Drives We can supply CD ROM solutions for ALL Amigas from A500 to A40Q0.
We will match any genuine advertised price and also give four lop titles free: Nick Faldo’s Championship Golf; Syndicate; Pinball Fantasies & The Chaos Engine on top where we have to price match any product.
All our External IDE CD ROM Drives have built in power supplies (the Three different options to connect CD ROM drives to A60Q or A1200
a) Use PCMCIA port for total external solution without opening up
your Amiga. You can Hot plug this device without harming your
Amiga.
B) Use Internal IDE port with AlfaDuo if you have 2.5" Hard Drive
(will be with full IDEFIX software).
C) Use Internal IDE port with GbQuatro buffered interface if you
have 3.5” Hard Drive (will be with full IDEFiX software).
AH CO ROM drives have play CD facility.
44pin 3 connector cable £5.00 44pin 2 connector cable..... .£3.00 40pin 3 connector cable 90cm ....£5.00 AlfaDuo 44pin to 40 pin Interface & IDE cables£20.00 AlfaQuatro 3x40pin interface & IDE cables .£39.95 DD floppy disks (50) (including multicoloured disk labels) Alp.UU DD floppy disks (100) (including multicoloured disk labels) ......£2}.00
3. 5" Hard Drive Kit for A600 1200 + irvialt software ...
£15 00 Diskbox to hold 10
discs ......£1.00 Animal Jungle design
and Dinosaur design.£2.00 Optical Mouse
Mat .....£5.00 2 in 1
Scanner Mouse Pad Can be used as a memo pad
..... £3-00 Amiga Power Supply 4.5 amp
....£15.00 Plain
Wristrest £2.00
CD Cleaners - half price CD Rom
Cleaner ...£-3.00
Automatic CD Rom Cleaner (battery powered)...£6.00 User Lens
Cleaner ......£4.50 Quad speed CD ROM
for Six speed CD ROM for Eight speed CD ROM for 12 speed CD
ROM for 16 speed CD ROM for External Internal External*
Internal A600 A1200 A1500 A2000 A500 A500+ A4000 £149.00
£119.00 £129.00 £109.00 £159.00 £129.00 £139.00 £119.00
£169.00 £139.00 £149.00 £129.00 £179.00 £149.00 N A £139,00
£189.00 £159.00 N A £149.00 '(for A500 A500+ Alfapower hard
drive controller and Hard Drive is required). A1500 A2000
supplied with IDE controller & software.A40G0 supplied with
AlfaQuatro interlace & Full IDEFIX software.
Miscellaneous Products, Accelerator Boards Amiga Joysticks ....£9.95 IDE 3.5” Hard Drives Amiga Joypads .....£9-95 CD 32 Joypad ..... £14.00 IDE 3.5” Hard drives come formatted and installed with Workbench. Cable, screws, software and instructions supplied, (please ring for availability) Multi Media Speakers: 100 watt (pmpo) . £30.00 240 watt (pmpo) £45.00
l. OGig ......£130.00 ?L2Gig ......£135.00 *
1. 7Gig ......£155.00
2. 1 Gig £175.00
2. 5Gig ......£179.00 4Mb Simms £20.00 8Mb
Simms £30.00
3. 2Gig ......£200.00
3. 8Gig ......£235.00 5 Gig Maxtor..£329.95 “Amiga Format
Gold Award August '97” 16Mb Simms £60.00 32Mb Simms,..£140.00
1230 33Mhz + 4Mb .£135.00
1230 33Mhz + 8Mb .£145.00
1230 33Mhz + 16Mb .... £175.00 Viper
MKIV 42Mhz 4Mb (not upgradeable) .....,£80.00 CBEa.
1230 50Mhz + 4Mb .£159.00 1230 50Mhz + 8Mb .£169,00 1230 SOMhz + 16Mb £199.00 Accelerator for A600 Viper A630 40MhZ 4Mb (not upgradeable) £110.00 Viper A630 40Mhz 8Mb (not upgradeable) £120.00 AH prices include VAT. Please add £3.50 P&P for items under £30.00, £5.00 for items over £30.00, £8.00 P&P for Scanners, Speakers & Hard Drives, £10.00 courier for next day. Tax Free Export Orders Welcome.
Golden Image accepts Access. Visa, Cheques & Postal Orders. E&OE. Prices subject 10 change without nolice. Goods subject to availability. Specifications subject to change without notice.
Golden Image (UK) Ltd s MasterCard Unit 65, Hallmark Trading Estate, Fourth Way, Wembley, Middx HA9 0LH Sales Hotline No: 0181 900 9291 Fax: 0181 900 9281 http : www.reserve. co.uk gold Talking Pages: 0800 600900 _Our standard terms anti conditions apply - available on request. We do not supply mi a trial basis News Amiga network solution 0olden Image UK Ltd has announced the release of Connexion, a new Ethernet adapter that allows any Amiga 1500, 2000, 3000 or 4000 to je connected up to a standard Ethernet network.
Connexion offers a fast 10 Mbit Ethernet link and autoboots via Netzwerk, the in-built boot Rom, avoiding the need to install additional drivers. The card employs a 32K - 16 bit on board cache so as to boost performance and avoid any loss of processing speed, as often happens over Ethernet connections.
The Connexion adapter retails at £175.00 and is available directly from Golden Image. For more details phone:-0181 900 9291 sion of the software also offers Swedish, Norwegian, Hungarian and Italian user interface. The English manual has apparently been improved but is not yet completely finished. A slightly limited but freely distributable version of Make CD is available on the Internet on the MakeCD home page at http: makecd.core.de Make CD is available at HiSoft and its dealers, and directly from the authors. For direct orders contact: Angela.Schmidt@stud.uni-karlsruhe.de CygnusED's
authors have decided to poll Amiga owners on the development of the project. The text editor should be released by the end of this year.
If you're interested in influencing the development of the editor send your suggestions to: schatztruhe@cww.de German Software developers Angela Schmidt and Patrick Ohly have announced the release of their latest software package. Make CD 2.4 is the first CD writer software with CD-RW support and the software can now completely erase and rewrite CD-RW media. Cds can be erased up to 1000 times without any deterioration in quality.
Make CD 2.4 offers a host of extra features to v2.3 including improved drivers and bug fixes. The latest verygnusED soon to BE RE-LEASED Schatztruhe, the German based Amiga software company, is to re-release the popular Amiga text editor, CygnusED.
Schatztruhe has collaborated with the test editor's original author's, Bruce Dawson and Olaf Barthel to update the program and fix long standing bugs. Schatzetruhe and jULCAN TAKES Iamerica Vulcan Software, the Amiga games publisher, has expanded its operations to include the US and Canada and officially launched its American branch.
Vulcan Software America will offer mail order, services and technical support specifically for its American customers. It will also assume the role as main distributor of Vuican products to dealers in America and Canada.
Dealers who want to stock Vulcan products should now contact Vulcan Software America for more information.
Bomputer City to DISTRIBUTE IN BELELUX Amiga International Inc, and the Rotterdam based computer retailers, Computer City have agreed on a deal which will enable the Dutch firm to market the Amiga in the Benelux countries. The deal, which was formalised on 15 July will allow Computer City to sell new Amigas and peripherals and software support for existing models.
"This activity will help us to reinvigorate the Amiga market place in the Benelux. Our basic of success is to work together with partners to build up the former market places and to find new ones and to be ready for new product distribution", said Petro Tyschtschenko, managing director of Amiga International, Inc. Computer City was founded in 1988 and has since then been dedicated to catering for the Amiga market in the Benelux counties. According to the company, it believes that there has been, and still is, a substantial market for the machine in Benelux and the rest of the world.
For more information contact: Compute City Ron van Herk Computer City Fax: +31-10-4517748 E-mail: info@compcity.nl Web: http: www.compcity.nl OCTOBER 1997 EB HACKER STALLS THE INTERNET Hacker, Eugene Kashpureff, plunged the Internet into chaos last month with the most spectacular hack since the 1988 Internet Worm paralysed the Net Kashpureff claims to have exploited a loophole in the Domain Name Service software normally used to look up addresses of Internet sites which allowed him to add his servers to the official list of Internet domains and 'top-level' servers.
The hacker's actions were apparently a protest against InterNlCs monopoly on top-level domain names and prevented Internet users all over the world from connecting to their desired sites.
Cerbernet was one of the few ISPs to escape the chaos. According to Cerbernet's Technical Director, Justine Kerry "Tbe Internet still depends on a level of trust and community. The InterNlCs monopoly on domain naming runs contrary to this spirit, and yet depends on co-operation by all ISPs in that we must all choose to use the official root name servers. Most ISPs don't even realise they are effectively bolstering the InterNIC monopoly.
Sadly the whole Internet has suffered the consequences of unilateral action taken by AlterNIC to smash this monopoly by overriding our name server choices".
For more information take a look at http: www.alternic.net protesthtml H CPUG SUMMER OFFER i ATEWAY 2000 FIGHTS Amiga licence claim The Independent Computer Products User Group has announced that it is to cut its six month subscription rate to £13 (including one share) for UK members and £15.50 for Eire and Europe. Overseas airmail rate for the offer will be £18.
ICPUG was formed back in 1978 to provide help and advise for owners of Amigas, Pcs and other home computers. ICPUG is regarded as being about the only remaining source of information for 8 bit computers.
The membership offer includes all the ICPUG journals for 1997, a free PD software library for the Amiga and all other Commodore machines and a PD library for the PC (Windows and DOS).
For more details phone John Bickerstaff on 0181 651 5436, or take a look at the ICPUG Web site at: www.icpug.org.uk Gateway 2000 , the Fortune 500 company that now owns the rights to Amiga International, disputed Rightiming Electronics' bid to sell and develop the Amiga in the far East this month.
On 23 July Lotus Pacific, a public company listed on NASDAQ Bulletin Board, announced it had signed a co-operation agreement with China's largest TV producers, the Sichuan Changhong Electronics Group Corporation of China, to produce 200, 000 units of the Wonder TV A6000.
Rightiming Electronics, a direct subsidiary of Lotus Pacific, purports to hold a licence to use Amiga patents, trademarks and copyrights in China, Taiwan and the parts of the former Soviet Union. The deal with Sichuan Changhong includes supplying the company with product specific chip sets and other key components.
Gateway 2000 responded the next day by issuing a press release to the effect that it disputed any claims by Rightiming Electronics about owning a licence to produce Amiga technology.
"We dispute its license, its right to sell any license and we dispute any claims it has made with respect to Amiga patents, copyrights, or trademarks. Gateway 2000 owns all Amiga patents, copyrights and trademarks world-wide and will continue to license AMIGA technology to qualified companies", said Gateway's press release.
Ew MediaSoft titles MediaSoft, the UK publisher of Amiga Review, has announced that it is to split the magazine into two individual parts to fully cover the various aspects of the Amiga.
Amiga Review will be focused largely on hardware and 'serious' applications, with Amiga Gamer being geared towards the Amiga games market.
Amiga Review will be halved to £1,60, while Gamer will be sold for £1.50. People who took out a subscription to Amiga Review will receive both magazines for no extra charge.
Both magazines will be only available through mail order.
The split has come about because of the resurgence of interest in the Amiga computer platform and the increased number of games that are being developed and produced. Readers can send orders by sending cheques or postal orders to MediaSoft Magazines, Communications House, Isle of Wight, P037 7LU.
For more information take a look at Amiga Review's Web site at: http: www.mediasft.demon.co.uk ARMagazine arindex.html 1A1 fi i Qmiga Apache 9 Thp npw vprqinn nf thp Amipa Arwhe Wpb The new version of the Amiga Apache Web server software has been released. Amiga Apache 1.2.1 httpdaemon is downloadable from the Apache Web site http: www.dsdelft.nl -apache . It's fully compatible with the original Apache Web server which can be found at: http: www.apache.org. The Amiga Apache project is completely staffed by volunteers and Amiga enthusiasts under the leadership of Bert Vortman.
Got an Amiga? FtfWEMf?
I H ROMA ANNOUNCES NEW DIY A1200 TOWER CASE Chroma, the specialist Amiga hardware supplier, has announced the launch of the A1200 DIY tower case. The Chroma DIY tower is, so Chroma boast, the cheapest tower case available in the UK.
It will take an A1200 motherboard complete with internal PSU or 'powerbrick' for motherboard power. The PCMCIA slot is still accessible for use with a Squirrel or similar device. The tower will also allow the user to install a complete PC system or Zorro slot array.
The Chroma tower has 10 drive bays and comes complete with 230 watt PSU, UK mains plug, screws spacers cable ties 2-part stand guide. To complete a tower system, a keyboard+adapter and floppy drives+adapter are required along with any IDE or SCSI peripherals interfaces.
The tower is available, either fully converted (£105.99), or in its cheaper DIY format (£79.99). For more information contact Chroma at: chromanet@aol.com or on: 01328 862693 Amiga Computing Extracting Cover Disk Before putting the cover disks anywhere near your computer, write protect them by moving the black tab in the top corner of the disk, so you can see through the hole. Doing this makes sure you cannot damage your disks in any way. There is also no reason why the cover disks need to be written to, so even if the computer asks you to write enable the disks, don't do it To extract any
single archive, simply double click its icon, and follow the on screen instructions. If you want to extract the program to Ram, select the NOVICE level on the welcome screen, and press proceed once on the current screen, and then again on the next The program can then be found in your Ram disk. Normally most programs need further installing, so read the documents on how to do this.
Hard Drive Users Hard drive users do not have to boot with the first disk, but you must make sure you have the Amiga's Installer program in your C drawer. To make sure your hard drive has the correct files in place double dick on the SetupHD icon.
This will check if you have the Installer program and if not will copy it across. Do not worry as it will not write over any existing files.
All you hard drive owners will find MultiExtract very useful. It is a separate method of extracting the cover disk files.
It allows you to extract a number of files in one go, to your hard disk or Ram.
When you run MuitiExtract you will be presented with a number of check boxes, each representing one of the programs on that cover disk. Just de-select all the programs you do not want extracting, and then press proceed. All the selected programs can now miraculously be found in the selected destination.
Another great selection of Amiga utilities to make life easier Magnum Opus 2 Author: Richard Lane Requires Directory Opus v5.5 Why can't life be more simple? Why can't there be just one picture format, one sound file type and one document style? But no, every man and his dog has come up with their own stupid format, and where does this leave you the user? I'll tell you where - confused and bemused.
Help is at hand however, for Opus 5 users at least, in the form of Magnum Opus version 2. This add-on for Opus 5 will save you hours of frustration trying to set up and configure Opus 5 to use all those different file types. To back up the predefined file types there are a whole host of icons for use in Directory Opus and there are configuration files prewritten to take advantage of both the new filetypes and new icons.
Doing the installation by hand. If you already have an earlier version of Magnus Opus installed this will of course repface many of those files so don't worry.
To start you should rename the original filetype directory in the Opus drawer to file- types_original and then copy the new file- type drawer from the Magnum Opus directory. Next copy over the new images drawer and also the contents of the other drawers to there respective Opus directories. When you restart Directory Opus it will take a little longer than normal but this is perfectly normal.
You have two routes to installing Magnus Opus. You can either use the supplied installer that uses the normal Amiga installer, all very lovely or, for more experienced users, you can try Big Red Adventure Solution If you should find your Amiga Computing CoverDisk damaged or faulty, please return it to: ISB Pk TIB House, JI Edward Street Bradford, W. Yorks Em 7BH, Please allow 28 days for delivery Author: John Barnsley Requires Big Red Adventure Well, we started so we'll finish. If you have been looking forward to completing the Big Red Adventure with the help of our solution and are
panicking now it has stopped, with this being the last issue and all, don't worry yourselves. Here is the complete solution for this rather nifty point and click adventure. As you will see the whole thing is rather long as so even with the solution will take yOU ages to finish, enjoy. They get punched, alright?
Amiga Computing There is a story behind this. When it was announced that Gateway had bought Amiga Technologies I was searching around the Internet for a nice picture of a cow, but the Internet being what it is I couldn't find sack all. I then came across Ben and Jerry's action cow and a bit of joy entered my life. Just load the gif into your favourite paint package and print it off. With the supervision of a suitable adult, cut out the cow, sniff some glue, tape the beast together and lo and behold, you will have your very own Gateway Amiga Ben and Jerry Action cow type thing, groovy.
IA aitGUI i Author. Dirk Ttee Requires Workbench 204 If you ever need to delay people on a computer it is a good idea to let them know why they are sitting around doing nothing, and how long they are going to be exercising their posterior. This tiny program replaces the original Amiga Wait command with one that pops up a small windows that has a progress bar along with a count down. It is all very easy to use and looks a lot better.
If you got last month's great issue, and it was great, you may have read little Dan Winfield's (and he is little) comparison of the Picasso IV and CyberVision 3D boards.
In the review Mr Winfield used a program called Wspeed to do some straight forward speed comparisons, and for your pleasure here is the very same program so you can try it out and see how much slower your AGA and ECS systems are in comparison.
Visual Prefs Mount DOS Author: inVTTnimV Requires Workbench 2.04 This tiny little program that adds a handy function to Workbench and your Amiga operating system. What is this amazing function I hear you cry. It simply recognises and mounts PC hard drives connected to your Amiga. These drives can either be IDE or SCSI drives, and it may actually recognise any type of media including Jazz and Zip drives, but I cannot guarantee that as I have never tried it.
Before you can use MountDOS you need to change a few of its tool types so click on its icon and select the icon information. You will need to change the device and unit numbers so MountDOS knows what drive it should be looking for. You will also need to take the mount command out of the brackets so it will actually mount the drive.
Author: Massimo Tantignone Requires Workbench 3.0 One thing that has been made accountable for putting people off the Amiga is the interface. With the flash and shiny interface of System 8 and Windows 95, the old Amiga Workbench is looking rather shabby and dull. But this does not have to be case, over the last year or so, programs like Sysihack and MCP have shown that there is no reason why the interface cannot be updated quite simply, and so look a lot better.
Visual Prefs takes the whole thing to the extreme allowing you to alter almost every part of Workbench.
The result is a much better looking interface, as you can see from the grab. The program is also simplicity to use. A preference program lets you configure the interface and to actually get these changes in place put the line run nil: visualprefs in your startup sequence just before the I Prefs command is run.
One thing that makes MU1 so good is it modular design that allows separate parts to be added or just updated at a later date. On the disk are two new part for MUI one is an update to the busy single that many programs use, while the other is a replacement for the list view that is much more advanced than the one.
Just used the supplied scripts and everything will be copied across as for you, you should also restart you machine before trying them, to make that the libraries are not resident in memory.
©uildhall is best know for its extensive range of re-released Amiga games. With mini Office, however, it makes its first foray into the serious side of Amiga software. As with its games efforts, Guildhall has gone for another re-release of an old Amiga package
- in this case mini Office, originally released by Europress
Software some five years ago.
I have to admit than when I first got hold of the box I was not too hopeful. Guildhall can get away with releasing old Amiga games as for the last few years there has been very little progression or development in that area (take FI 5-11 that is nine years old but it still plays well). When it comes to utilities, however, it's whole different bail game.
The "serious" software side of the Amiga has been far from stagnant the last few years.
Haarge and Partner came to the forefront of development and long running Amiga programs such as Wordworth, FinalWriter, Turbocalc - to name but a few - continue to be developed.
Mini Office comes on four disks; one contains the front-end and file manager program while the other three have the database, spreadsheet, wordprocessor, spell checker and graphic programs. As the programs are written in AMOS and were made five years ago, they are designed for 1 Mb floppy based Amigas and, as a result, there is no HD installer. The programs can be run from the hard drive, you just have to copy the contents of the files into a directory and assign each disk name to this directory.
The wordprocessor is somewhat of an early '80s throwback. Even the basic ED program could give it a run for its money. We are talking minimalist programming here - you can type text, make it bold, italic or underline it, add left, right and centre justification, adjust tab positions and that really is about it, apart from the spell checker.
Bottom .
Me Requirements RED essential BLACK recommended Onto the spreadsheet. Again, this a basic program with the minimum of editing tools available. You can cut and paste individual or blocks of cells and, while using formulae, you can still select cells and a range of cells, making creating formulae easy. The number of Guildhall dusts off another ancient Amiga program, but perhaps this one should have stayed in the crypt formulae covered is fairly extensive, including logarithmic and logical expressions.
The database module is a minimalist flat database. You can set up a template form and a few records, search those records and print them off. If you need to catalogue anything, such as your CD collection, you have far to much time on your hands, but it is possible with this database.
This leaves the graphics module; not so much a paint package of any description, but really an extension to the spreadsheet and database modules. Quite simply this will let you import a group of statistics or enter them manually and produce a chart of your choice.
Again, there are no real surprises here: Bar, pie and line charts are available along with stacked, area and 3-D versions. Up to four separate data sets can be used in the same graph at any one time.
At the end of the day, for 20 quid, you are getting a five year old AMOS program so you can't expect too much. The weakest part is the wordprocessor module which is very poor, the spreadsheet and database modules are passable and the disk manager and graphic programs are helpful additions.
The real decision you have to make is whether you would be better off spending another 25 pounds and getting the Word- worth Office CD, but then if you only have an A500 then this is as good as it gets.
RAM Product details Product Mini Office Supplier Guildhall Price £19.95 Tel 0891 227 355 | E-Mall Guildhall@glsukok.demon.co.uk s Ease of use 90% Implementation 50% Value For Money 75% Overall 65% AMIGA Computing 12 OCTOBER 1997 1 MILLION POUND STOCK CLEARANCE!
WE HAVE A PRICE PLEDGE POLICY - WE WILL NEVER KNOWINGLY BE UNDERSOLD.
MAINBOARDS
E. xc Vat Inc Vat INTEL CHIPSET VX 512 £52,00 £61.10 INTEL
CHIPSET HX 512 £60.00 £70.50 INTEL CHIPSET TX 512 £69,00
£81.08 FAX MODEMS DIAMOND 33.fi VOICE £40.00 £47.00 I MB
DIAMOND £19.00 £22.33 EXTERNAL 33.6 £60.00 £70.50 2 MB DIAMOND
£27.00 £31.73 US ROBOTICS 33.6 £75.00 £88.13 I MB GENERIC
£13.00 £15.28 US ROBOTICS 33.6 ext £120.00 £141.00 2 MB
GENERIC £23.00 £27.03 MONITORS DAEWOO 14” £99.00 £ 116.33
DAEWOO 15” £159.00 £186.83 DAEWOO 17” £280.00 £329.00 ALL
DAEWOO MONITORS CARRY A 3-YEAR ON-SITE WARRANTY MEMORY 4 MB
SIMMS £10.00 £11.75 8 MB SIMMS £21.00 £24.68 16 MB SIMMS
£45.00 £52.88 32 MB SIMMS £99.00 £116.33 I MB 30 PIN £5.00
£5.88 4 MB 30 PIN £17.50 £20.56 16 MB DIMMS £45.00 £52.88 32
MB DIMMS £99.00 £116.33 64 MB DIMMS £199.00 £233.53 | CASES
MINI TOWER 200W PSU £18.00 £21.15 MIDI TOWER 200W PSU £25.00
£29.38 FULL TOWER 200W PSU £48.00 £56.40 ALL CASES ARE CE
APPROVED MISC FLOPPY DRIVES £11.00 £12.93 SOUND CARDS Exc Vat
Inc Vat 16 BIT £13.00 £15.28 32 WAVE £39.00 £45.83 SOUND
BLASTER 16 £39.00 £45.83 GRAPHICS CARDS HARD DRIVES EIDE
1. 2 GIG £105,00 £123.38
2. 1 GIG £117.00 £137.48
2. 5 GIG £145,00 £170,38
3. 2 GIG £165,00 £193.88
3. 8 GIG £180.00 £211.50
5. 1 GIG £245.00 £287.88 PROCESSORS INTEL PI33 £82.00 £96.35
INTEL PI 66 £125.00 £146.88 INTEL P200 £189.00 £222,08 MMX
PI66 £179.00 £210,33 MMX P200+ . £299.00 £351.33 CYRIX PI66+
£55.00 £64.63 CYRIX P200+ . £75.00 £88.13 CD ROM DRIVES 6
SPEED £32,00 £37.60 8 SPEED £32.00 £37.60 16 SPEED £52.00
£61,10 AUDIO CABLES
0. 55p
0. 65 p KEYBOARDS & MICE 105 KEYBOARD £6.00 £7.05 MOUSE £2.25
£2,64 $ © 06 Z 0© VO 0© VO IT) « © z © o a vo a % s m 0 1 I
0© o© H © fa in fa H DELIVERY CHARGES SMALL
CONSUMABLES AND SOFTWARE ITEMS UNDER THE VALUE OF £59 PLEASE
ADD £3.50 P&P. OTHFIR ITEMS EXCEPT LASERS, NEXT DAY COURIER
SERVICE £10 PER BOX. OFFSHORE AND HIGHLANDS, PLEASE CALL FOR A
QUOTATION. IN ADDITION WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING EXPRESS
SERVICES: SATURDAY DELIVERY NORMAL RATE PLUS £15 PER BOX,
MORNING, NEXT DAY NORMAL RATE PLUS £ 10 PER BOX. E&OE PRICES
ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTICE, ALL TRADEMARKS
ACKNOWLEDGED.
TRADERS TERMS & CONDITIONS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.
2% CREDIT CARD SURCHARGE APPLIES TRADE AND EDUCATIONAL ENQUIRIES WELCOME PERSONAL CALLERS WELCOME Omiga Web development seemed to jump out of nowhere. I remember, just over two years ago, being thrilled that Amosaic could display both text and images and in version two, forms were supported. Looking back, Amiga browsers have come on as much as the HTML they display.
At that time Web sites where boring, the first version of HTML was still the only version widely used, and this lead to simply designed single column pages interspersed with graphics. So what happened? Well, Netscape 2 appeared and introduced new table tags and frames, along with progressive decoding, transparent GIFs and a bunch of new tags for site designers.
Cally.
Which one wins then? I could sit on the fence and say, "At the end of the day the real winners are you and the Amiga," but that would be copping out. So, taking a look at each in turn - Aweb technically provides by far the best page layout and understands more tags than the others, but it is greatly let down by its very poor image handling and clunky interface.
Bang, suddenly every magazine was talking about the on-line experience - cyber this, cyber that and cyber the other, and we are still going strong. Can you blame us, before the advent of fast modems and low cost ISPs we were stuck with using BBSs. I'm not knocking BBSs, I have used them in the past and they offered a good, if limited, service. The Internet provides everything the BBS can, but a million times more and on a world-wide scale.
.BOCCLCP.--* OslA-
- i 1 I Thtfj I t’jjjtr a ' I t c aw- atttn i jmn I | uli
IC. mjVsU r.’ Oil Suddenly the Web became the glitz and ? - ? « :
a * a a i a .III CI'NTKR .HJv.llIV Al.KiN vmUf" .Nf..rmi* .11
nr ¦ u rctt- rwr'’ • Just for comparison, here is internet
Explorer 3 on the Mac. Every part of this page is correct,
even down to the text area being correctly shown as a sing e
text line, and not the three or four that all the Amiga
programs display New versions of Aweb, iBrowse and Voyager.
I'd say that calls for a head to head feature bright lights
and everyone was interested in it Amosaic was dumped and from
those ashes rose iBrowse - a very competent Web browser with
table support, internal image decoding and complete forms
support. And the Amiga Computing team looked upon iBrowse and
saw that it was good and made their own table based Web site,
and when Ben learned Photoshop properly we got the white
buttons and not the dodgy orange ones.
So here we are today, table, frames, internal image decoding and Javascript and Java are just around the corner and 1 thought it was about time to see how the three remaining Amiga Web browsers shape up.
Testing Web browsers is not the most straight forward task. Looking at features all three have pretty much the same features.
Things like bookmarks, cache browsers, definable buttons, quick links, grey scale output, printing, URL history are found in all three.
Aweb is the obvious program when it comes to missing features, such as no internal mail or image decoding. It cannot even handle animated GIFs as it is restricted to using Datatypes. It is however very stable, in fact Aweb has never crashed while in use.
Something you can expect iBrowse and Voyager to do once or twice a day.
When it comes to layout quality, I would say Aweb does the best job, but its palette selection and dependence on Datatypes ruins any chance it has when it comes to graphics quality. Generally I have found that Voyager and iBrowse give the same sort of performance both graphically and techniWidely accepted as the trailing program in the browser wars.
As you can see, Aweb displays almost every part of the page perfectly. The big exception is the image scaling part - the top two corner images should be a quarter of the size, and also the top GIF image is an animation GIF that Aweb cannot support due to its dependence on Datatypes Amiga Computing W HIV UJGN *frtilri’ TU RE H»» *1 Ali' S - el.'lf' I The main thing that hits you is that iBrowse decided not to display the text area form. Apparently if there is no name attribute, iBrowse just ignores the form.
Also you can see that iBrowse does not seem to support the list shapes even though it does have alternatives, but other wise everything is hunky dory iBrowse was once way ahead of the rest on all fronts, and I still think the layout and design of the front end are the best. It has its own progressive image decoder and can use Datatypes if need be, and it passed just about all the HTML tests.
Generally, Voyager is taken to be the superior browser and I would have agreed, but having carefully tested Voyager it does seem to make a poorer job of HTML handling than iBrowse or Aweb. On the plus side it has the best image decoder, though its dithering and palette selection could be better (not a problem for graphic card users), and uses less memory than the other two.
So, on efficiency and speed, Voyager wins.
On design, iBrowse still leads and on technical merit it has to be Aweb, with iBrowse and Voyager an equal second.
Testing testing It is always difficult trying to comprehensively compare two programs, and with Web browsers the number of tags and possible combinations out there make it an almost endless task. So one possibility would be to look at a few general sites and see how the browsers handle them, but you could always end up missing some important tag.
For a more formal task I used a prewritten test page found on www.threetoad5.com Browser main.html This takes the most regularly used and important tags and techniques on Web sites and puts them into one page.
The page tests frames, tables, imbedded tables, lists, heading and fonts sizes, image formats and scaling, forms and various other formatting commands. Generally, if a browser can display everything on this page, it should have no trouble in the real world.
Qeature comparison As you can see, feature for feature, there really is very little to tell these three browsers apart. The biggest omission is for Aweb - its dependence on Datatypes really does leave it trailing behind the others. Otherwise it would be keeping up with the "big two" quite well.
For the memory tests I ran the programs on a 64 colour 800x600 screen and loaded up the Amiga Computing main page. Using the avail command I measured the amount of memory before and after each program was run. So you should remember that MU1 and ClassAct are also included in the values.
URL completion is rather nice and is offered by iBrowse and Voyager.
The simplest form works as for Netscape where you do not have to type the whole www.cnn.com only the cnn part and the browser fills in the rest They also offer history based URL completion, so the browser tries to guess the URL you want as you type it, but usually gets it wrong.
The times at the end of the list shows how long it took the browser to reload the Amiga Computing homepage, with no memory cache and two connections. As you can see, iBrowse is surprisingly slower than the other two at 18 seconds, turning the palette selection to fast and removing the secondary dithering does reduce this to 10 seconds.
Browser iBrowse Voyager Aweb Datatypes yes no yes Prog, GIF yes yes no Prog. Jpeg yes yes no Prog. PNG no yes no Scaled images yes yes no Animated GIFs yes yes no H VSpace yes no yes Tables yes yes yes BG colour yes yes yes BG gfx yes no yes % Widths no yes yes Frames yes yes yes Hidden yes yes yes Moveable yes yes yes Lists yes yes yes New shapes no no yes Ordered yes no yes HTTPs yes yes no Middle align no yes no Forms yes yes yes URL completion yes yes no Connections 32 32 256 Mozilla spoofing no yes no News no yes yes Mail yes yes external Drag and Drop yes yes no Bookmarks yes yes yes
Printing yes yes yes Keyboard yes yes yes Arexx yes yes yes Cut Paste no yes no Chip Mem 740Kb 630Kb 776Kb Fast Mem
1. 5Mb
1. 2Mb
1. 2Mb Total Mem
2. 2Mb
1. 8Mb
2. 0Mb Javascript planned soon ?
Java ?
Coming 7 Time 18 secs 7 secs 15 secs Amiga Computing LOW COST DELIVERY Te 0113 231 -9444 Late Night Opening Wednesday & Thursday till 7,30pm AUTHORISED REPAIR CENTRE We offer a FREE quotation on your Amiga or any peripheral (monitors, printers etc).
A delivery tariff of just £5.00 is charged or alternatively you can visit our showroom, We can also arrange a courier pickup at an additional OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK C°St°f£l' °° rg.llUilMUIllllllllHFl,
• 2-4 Week Days £3.99 _
• Next Week Day £5.99
• Saturday Delivery £14.99 I if Delivery subject to stock
availability SHOWROOM ADDRESS:E FIRST COMPUTER CENTRE, UEE
DEPT. AC, UNIT3, ARMLEY PARKCT, STANNINGLEY RD, LEEDS, LSII
2AE.
EASY ACCESS FROM M61, M I and Al comirB KI"K5T««*. «o CENT* Aei Open Sunday 11 am to 4pm AWMLt? M62JM62I Plcxw alow S waiting djyi lor ihi ur (IrjriiKr. Ptfcn are correct at (he tana orfp n| Irj pmv Plrjw rh«li our Ulnt |ricnbrfarrordrrin|,Uub are subjecr to our standard !
Uvtra ft contains (copy I r AUt upon rrqunt), E40L : |E-Mail: sales@firstcom.demon.co.uk F Hardware CD ROM Drives Squirrel I face CD ROM Drives LOWEST PRICES EVER!!
A I 200 4 Mb RAM £70.99 A I 200 8 MbRAM £89.99 33MhzCoProadd£25.00 Amiga Magic Packs Includes, Wordworth V4SE, Datastore, Organiser, Turbocaic 3.5, Personal Paint V6.4, Photogenics 1.2SE, Pinball Manta, Whizz & now also Directory Opus 4.12. A1200 - 2Mb Ram - No HD £299.99 A1200 - 6Mb Ram - 260Mb HD £429.99 A1200 -68Q30EC 40Mhz - 10Mb Ram - 260Mb HD - £549.99 A1200 - 68040 25Mhz - 18Mb Ram- 1.3Gb HD £699.99 A1200 - 68040 40Mhz - 18Mb Ram - 1,3Gb HD - £799.99 All HD Versions Include Scaia MM300. Ail 68040 Ver. Inc. 250wact PSU lew!
Ultra 6 Speed IDE £149.99 Ultra Drive Kit £99.99 Low Price Surf Squirre J I SCSI-II Interface !
* £79.99
• Whpn bought with any modem or if sought wpinl.
OctagorVGVP SCSI Card £99.99 SCS4-II in tertace card (or big t»* Amiga, A(0007CfK ML 4 Mb 72 Pin SIMM £20.99 8 Mb 72 Pin SIMM CJH.99 16 Mb 72 pin SIMM £69 99 32 Mb 72 pin SIMM £129 99 I Mb 30 pin SIMM £8 99 4 Mb 30pin SIMM £23.99 256by4 DRAM (OIL*) (each)£4.99 256 by4 Z1PPS (each)£6.99 Part exchange available on your old memory. Call for pricing.
Internal SCSI CD ROM Sanyo CRDx 2 £24.99 Part-Exchange First Computer Centre will offer Part Exchange on your Computer Hardware & Peripherals, eg Monitors, Printers & Memory etc Call for pricing.
2nd User Bargains Available Totally re-furbisned Units with a minimum 3 month warranty for sale, also all your Spares Repairs catered for.
2nd User Bargains
• Commodore E0S4’s£l30
• Printers from £30
• Amiga's 500 +*s from £50
• Al500’s from £150
• Amiga A i 200‘s £ 180
• Multi-Sync monitor £ 180
• InkJet's from £90 .• Accelarator card's £80 j Accelerator Cards
Blizzard 1230-50 £109.99 Blizzard 1260-50 £369.99 Blizzard SCSI
Kit £69.99 Viper IV 42Mhz £89.99 Cyberstorm-50 £449.99 New!!
200Mhz Card....Call Toshiba570lxl2 Teac Cdxl6 £112.99 £133.99
[u Pro-GRAB Only...£99.99 24 RVTPCMCIAadaptor£)9.99 Hard Drives
Disk Drives Monitors Peripherals Mega Mouse* 400 dpi ( 3
button) £12 99 Amiga Mouse 560dpi (3 button) £ 12 99 Quality
Mousemat (4mm) Golden Image Am ST Trackball £17.99 ZyFi-2
Speakers (8 watts channel) £26 99 ZyFi Pro Speakers (16
wattsi'cKaiine!)£57.99 Roboshift (Auto mousc J.stkk switch£9.99
68832 Co Pro 25mhzPLCC £25.99 66882 Co Pro 33mhzPLCC £29,99
Zipstiek joystick £11.99 SaitckMcgagripll £12.99 PRIMAA500 512k
RAM no dock £19 99 PRIMAA500+ I MbRAM £29.99 PRIMA A600 I Mb
RAM no clock £29.99 f3.5M Hard Disk Drives!
IDE SCSI l,2Gig.„£ 144.99 270Mb......£99.99 1,7Gig...£ 159.99 540Mb_____£ 149.99
2. 1 Gig...£169.99 l.8Gig......£249.99 2,5Gig,..£207.99 2.1 Gig
£397.99
3. 2Gig,..£220.99 4,3Gig £862.99
2. 5" Hard Drives for A600 AI200 with Installation kit 8P Seagate
CONNER 80Mb....£64.99 !30Mb..,.£80.99 170Mb...£85.99 250Mb..£l
19.99 420Mb.£ 129.99 540Mb..£ 139.99
810. ......£149.99 l.0Gig..£l79.99 I -4Gig„£ 195.99 2.2Gig..£3
22.99, 17" 1701 .£399.99 17" Multi-Sync Monitor, lew"
Lowest ever price.
£I2L9?
I bi req.itasreitracott. New Amiga onitors Multi-Sync Monitors 14" 1438s......£259.99 Ll 4" Monitor Includes Built In Sneakei Build Your Own SCSI Hard Drive
• SCSI case with built in PSU £49.99
• SCSI Hard Drive,Select from above
• SCSI Squirrel Interface£45.00
• 12 Month Warranty.
Zip Tools Driver Software Suits Ztp & jazz Drives £ 16.99 Amiga External drive£44.99 PowerXL L76Mb £69.99 AI 200 600lnternaldrive£34.99 |ft50Q 500+lnternaldrive£34,9j Amiga Modulator £34.99 Amiga Std. PSU £29.99 Heavy Duty PSU £59.99
3. 5" H Drive Install Kit £ 19.99 Includes sec up software,
cables and full instructions, no Hard Drive.
Printers Flatbed Scanners Consumables Disks Ink Cartridges Canon BJ10 Star SJ48 £ 17.99 Canon BJ200 230 240 £ I 8.99 Canon BJ30 (3 pack) £12.99 Canon BJC 70mono(3 pack) £10.99 Canon BJC 70 colour (3 pack) £17.99 Canon BJC 4000 colour (single) £1 6.99 Canon BJC 4000 mono (single) £6.99 Canon BJC 4000 mono high cap. £28.99 Canon BJC 600 mono col, £8.99 £7.99 Citizen Printiva mono col. £5.99 Citizen Printiva Metallic* £15.49 Citizen Projet lie mono col. £6.99 £29.99 HP. Deskjet 340 mono col. £21.95 £26.99 HP.Deskjet 400 mono col. £22.99 £24.99 HP.Deskjet 500 mono col. £22.99 £24.99 HP. DeskJet
660 mono col. £23.99 £25.99 HP. Deskjet850C mono col. £27.49 £28.99 Epson Stylus BOO mono £11.99 Epson Stylus mano col. £l].99 £27,99 Epson StylusCol. Ilsmono col.£ 17.99 C24 99 Epson Stylus 500 mono col. £ 16.99 £24.99 Epson Stylus 400 monofcol. £ 16.99 t 19 99 Epson Stylus 600 mono col. £ 16.99 E 19.99 Epson Stylus 800 mono col. £ 19.99 £ 19,99 StarSJ 144 mono colour (single) £7 .99 Paper
F. fold or S. sheet 500 sheets £6.99
F. foldor 5, sheet 1000 sheets £12.49
F. fold or S,sheet2000 sheets £21.49
- Quality Inkjet Paper (500) £10.99 Ribbons Citizen Swift ABC
mono £3.99 Citizen Swift ABC colour £12.99 Star LC90 mono
ribbon £4.99 Star LC10 100 mono £3.69 Star LC 10 100colour
£7.99 Star LC240C colour £13.99 Star LC240c mono £8.99 Star
LC240 mono £5.99 Star LC24-10 200 300 Colour £13.99 Re-Ink
Spray for mono ribbons £11.99 Canon EPSON ACCESSORIES
PrinterSwitch Bo* 2 way Printer Switch Box 3 way
1. 8 Metre printercable 3 Metre printercable 5 Metre printercable
10 Metre printercable £12.99 £17.99 £4.99 £6.99 £8.99 £12.99
Stylus 400 Colour £189.99 710*720 dp, 4ppm Black, JppmColour.
Stylus 600 Colour £259.99 I 440dpl, t ppm Black, 4 ppm Colour.
Stylus 800 Colour £399.99 1440dpi, Bppin Black, Tppm Colour.
Epson GT-5000 Scanner £269.99 Entry level A4Colour Flatbed Scanner.
Epson GT-8500 £399.99 400dpi Fully featured A4 Colour Flatbed Scanner Amiga Scanning S.ware £59.99 Canon BJ30 £159.99 Portable mono print**, JO P*r* ASF built In.
Canon BJC70Colour £185.99 Portable colour print**. 10 ytfrASF, Canon BJ240C £150.99 Colour Prlplrr.72a dpi.
Canon BJC4200 £199,99 New version, with Photo R* jilt in Cart- Option CanonBJC4550 £369.99 At version, wrl (h Photo ReaJlim Cart. Option Canon BJC620 £249.99 Enharwfd colour printer, virtual 710 dpi.
Epson Iron-On Transfer Epson 720dpi PaperPack £12.99 £12.99 Bulk DSDD I0x £3.49 100 x£26.99 30 x £9.99 200 x £49.99 50x£l4.99 500 x £114.99 Branded DSDD I0x £4,49 100 x £33.991 30x £11.99 200* £64.99 50x £17,99 500xZ155.99) Bulk DSHD 10 x £3.99 100 x £29.991 30 x £10.99 200 x £55.99 [ 50x £16.99 500x£I29.99| Branded DSHD 10 x £4.99 100 x £35.991 30 x£l2.99 200 x £69.99 50 x£!8.99 500 x £ 159.99 Canon T-Shirt Transfer Canon BC-06 Photo Cart.
Canon BC-09Fluorescenc Canon BC-22 Photo Kit Canon BC-29Fluorescont Canon Bubble Jet Paper £12.99 £24.99 £24.99 £37.99 £32.99 £14.99 Software
F. Writer Lte £19.99 Wordworth 6 £39.99
W. orth Office £49.99 Mini Office £29.99 Final Calc £64.99 Final
Writer 97 £49.99 Twist 2 £74.99 Dir, Opus 5.5 £45.99 Pro MIDI
I face £19.99 MegaLoSound £24.99 Aura 8 16 £29.99 £74.99
Technosound Pro £29.99 Network PC £17.99 CITIZEN HEWLETT®
PACKARD m HP DJ690 Photo Cartridge £29,99 HP Photography Paper
£9.99 HP Banner Paper £9.99 HP Deskjet Paper Pack 500£ 10.99
HP Premium Glossy Paper £9.99 PREMIER-INK Ink Cartridge
Refills Single refills (22ml) £6.99 Twin refills (44ml) £12-99
Threecolourkit (66ml) £19.99 Full colour kit (88ml) £27.99
Bulk refills (125ml) £24.99. ABC Colour printer £119.99 Simple
|u easy at ABC) route 34 pan printer.
Cornei» standard With Sotbeet Aototheet feeder Tractor feed optional at U 4 t4 HP340C Portable £179.99 Full Colour, 600 dpi Mono, J 00dpi Col.
HP400Colour £139.99 Full Colour. 400 dpaMono. J00 dpi Col, HP 670 Colour £154.99 JmiJOO dpi Colour Printing, now evert fatter.
HP870 Colour £350,99 (HiJOt dpi up to6 p'p m mono. ]p-'pfm colour HP5LLascrprinter £279.99 4 plpfm, *0(9 dpi. I Mb of Ram.
HP 6P Laser printer £585.99 Studio 2 New ver. 2.14 “If you wont to get the bei: poiuW* mufti from your printer. Get 0 copy of Studio“.
£49.99 or £44.99 when purchased with a Printer.
Turboprint 5 £49.99 or if bought with Printer £44.99. Labels x500 £6.99 Labels x 1000 £9.99 Delivery £1.50 per _ . . . Many More CD ROM Software 12r£3£* Miscellaneous Modems Software GP Fax £44.99 Net&Web £29.99 Net&Web II £66.99 i Browse £24.99 Net Connect v2 £49.99 Voyager v3 £23.00 i 17 99| c: IS 9?l £-19 99l £39 9?| £ 17.9?| £4.9
17. 99| £1791 £18.991 £17.991 £16 991 £17991 £20 991 £2099 £74.!
Octamed 6 & Sounds Terr.
Octamed Sound Studio Oh Yes More Worms PCX x86 Emulator Photogenics 2 Paranormal Encyclopedia Prima Shareware I CO Retro Gold CD Sci-Fi Sensation 2 Space & Astronomy System Booster The Spectrum CD 96 The Personal Suite Workbench A dd - On s WomenOfThe Web X-CD Golden Demos Horror Sensations (IB) Into-the-Net Insight Dinosaurs Kara Collection Learning Curve Light ROM 4 Light ROM Gold Magic Publisher Magic WB Enhancer Meeting Pearls v4 Miami A In To The Net Mods Anthology MultimediaToolkit 1*2 Network 2 CD hl wgri 2 ? CD!
AG A Experience 3 NFA £ 12.99 AGA Toolkit 97 £B.99 Amiga Desktop Vidro 2 £12.99 Amiga Developers CD £ 12.99 Amiga Repair Kit £39,99 AmiNet 14 15 16 17 18 £12.99 AmiNet Set 1 1 £17.99 AmiNet Set 3 4 £29.99 Arcade Classics Plus £12.99 Assassins CD Vol. 3 £17.99 C64 Sensations v2 £16.99 Card Games CD £11.99 Emulators Unlimited £17.99 Encounters £12.99 Epic Collection 3 £17.99 rclooedia 97 15 £17.99 £17.99 £12.99 £4.99 £25.99 £17.99 £17.99 £11.99 £39.99 £8.99 £8.99 £27.99 £23.99 £17.99
112. 99 e £33.99 'he Prima ATOM PRIMA V34+ Fax Modem
:e Performance ate* Class 1 Fax CE approved.
,£80,99 ?s & Amiga BBS Software Amazing Pric
• 33.6 Baud R
• BABT & 1 Only.. Complete with cabk II fSurfware Internet
Software Suite.
II with 30 Days Free Internet Trial i Only £9.99, if bought with Modem J Heavy Duty PSU
• High Quality 200 Watt PSU.
• Colour Co-Ordinated Casing.
• 4 x The Power of Std. Amiga PSU
• 12 Month Warranty.
Now Only,rrt _ _ £59.99 Modem Accessories Phone Line Extension Cables 5m£6.99 I0m£8.99 I5m£l0.99 Dual Socket Adaptor..£6.99 Ofew years back when I was still at university I came across some Postscript documents that I needed to read and, more usefully, print out At the time I had no software that could handle Postscript files and 1 was not in a position to run off and buy any, so I took a quick look through Aminet I saw two possible programs, one used the Post library but I could never get it to work, while the other was a program distributed under the GNU licence and had the odd name of
Ghostscript. But who cares what it is called when it can display and print Postscript files perfectly?
Postscript is a page description language thought up by Adobe. As Adobe wrote the industry standard page layout software, Quark Express, Postscript has itself become an Industry standard. It simply allows computers to define how a page, screen or picture should look, but in terms of straight lines, curves and shaded areas. OK, it is a little more complicated than that, but those are the basics.
Ghostscript is pretty straight forward to use. From the shell, supply the Postscript filename you want it to display. It will then, page by page, create each, well, page. For EPS images it just draws the image in colour if you tell it to use its own screen.
HAT TO GET Neil Mohr takes a look at a free program that gives everyone easy access to Postscript documents The one important thing you need to remember is to increase the amount of system stack available. To do this before you run Ghostscript you need to type stack 20000 into the Shell - this makes sure the program has enough workspace, otherwise it can crash. If at any time Ghostscript does crash, the stack being too small is more than likely the culprit.
As Ghostscript is designed to work with many different computer systems it handles the output - whether it be to a printer, window or screen - in much the same way. All this has to be selected through the Amiga's Shell using the DEVICE switch.
So, for instance, if you want to tell Ghostscript that you want it to run on its own custom screen you have to use the DEVICEamiga_custom switch. When you run Ghostscript it will pop up a screen mode requester from which you can select a screen mode. So, depending on which processor version of Ghostscript you are using, you would type the following: gsjOO -t EVICEatiga_custci miples tiger.ps Using this technique you can also tell Ghostscript to output a document directly to a printer. Using the -DEVICEamiga_printer switch it will use the built in Amiga printer driver, but Ghostscript has
internal handling for quite a large number of printers such as Epson, deskjet and laserjet printers - standards that many printers can handle. To find out which are supported, type gs_00Q -h for a complete list.
Versions compiled specifically for certain processor types. If in doubt just get the one called gssoi_ooo.lha as this will run on any Amiga. If you know what processor you have and if it has an FPU, go for the correct archive.
Along with the program archive you need the data archive called gs501_data.lha. With these two archives you can get Ghostscript up and running.
Extract both the archives and make an assign to the Ghostscript directory called Ghostscript - so the program knows where to look for its files.
You should also consider getting the fonts archive that has all the Postscript fonts you will need The archive is called gs501_fnts-std.lha and is 1.5Mb but is worth getting if you are going to view a lot of text files.
The Ghostscript package is freely available for Amiga users from Aminet So if you are on-line you can download the package yourself. Both the main executable and data file add up to just over 1 Mb, so downloading should take about 10 minutes. Otherwise it should be on either the Aminet set box or the latest Aminet CD release, you could also use one of the PD house that offer download services.
So if you are interested in Ghostscript FTP to your local Aminet site and go to the gfx show directory. All the Ghostscript related archives start with gs followed by the version number, currently 501.
If you want the main program itself you have to know what processor you have, as there are a number of different share alike Amiga Computing takes a look at the long running shareware SASG, as it enters its thi organisation, rd year I recently registered my demo of MUI, and was very impressed with the speed and service. If all shareware was so easy to register, I would do it at least once a month! All shareware should be brokered through SASG!
Dan Carmack, Missiouri AD FOR MUI 0ne thing you will notice if you have spent any time downloading programs from Aminet _ or have tried them out from the Cds is that, nine times out of ten, the person who wrote the program does not come from the same country as yourself.
This is somewhat of a tribute to how widespread the Amiga community is, and how the Internet has managed to keep it knitted tightly together over the last few troubled years.
This may give you a warm glow inside, but if the program in question happens to be a crippled shareware product that you have to get your hands on, payment to foreign country is not simplest or cheapest thing to achieve.
Your first choice is to send off a cheque or better, a cheque drawn under a foreign bank, but this could cost you or the payee more than the payment itself. So perhaps you could get the foreign cash from a bank and send that off in an envelope - doesn't cost you too much, but there is always the risk it could go astray in the post. Lately, some authors have started to accept credit cards but do you really want to give out you credit card number to some stranger on the other side of the world?
This was just one of many reasons SASG
- the Standardised Amiga Shareware Group- was formed in early
1994. Shortly after Commodore went bankrupt, a couple of
well-known shareware authors got together and their aim was to
create a non profit making organisation that would support
both the programmer and end user.
Its first objective was to set up a system that would allow the programmer to receive 100 per cent of the registration fee. This system guarantees that software programmers do not get exploited and end users can register high quality applications for around £15.
As the price is low, more end users I willing to register and support the development of the product. This results in a better maintained product with lots of new features. More recently, SASG has started to offer reduced prices not only to reward users who upgrade to later versions of their registered software, but also for general supporters of shareware.
By the time you read the organisation's Web site just over one year old and topped the 100,000 hits mark, so congratulations are due. SASG The flexible nature of MUI has now been exploited by a vast number of programs and that number continues to rise.
Currently, the most publicly visible programs come from Vapor Software and its incredible range of Internet software.
CHEAP STUFF Well you have read about all the great stuff that is available from SASG and I'm sure you may thinking well I would love to get a registered copy of Mlil or MagicWB. In conjunction with the lovely people at SASG Amiga Computing readers who are on-line can register SASG products on-line and receive a 20 percent discount.
All you have to do is get on-line browser to http: www.sasg.com, select the product you want and go to the ordering page. At the bottom there is a cycle gadget from which you will be able to select Amiga Computing. When you have entered all your details the password you need is Tusken 0ET Amiga Computing TU RE »? Tf. Tl'il.te :»?,:;: tw.v tvi i - ? .vith the s ijt to ts.-ir.eh the jh*t itnr •, : .
£; • •: .rri -. -.¦vi't & j:«ffa;.r.‘j;C£ If o*i area irst-w pi vtYv.fi :v r.-,
• ¦ ¦ -' 1u • 1 • r cy i ¦ j j iste sjic. Jijtxrlcr. I !?¦:•: • -
if* ... .'I '¦cm - ¦'.* yryprr.mi over the Internet. When you
apply for an account with FirstVirtual you are supplied with a
PIN number, this being an alias for your credit card number.
Whenever your PIN number is used to make a purchase, a
confirmation form is e-mailed to you and you must reply yes, no
or fraud before the transaction is made. So if someone does try
to use your PIN you will know straight away and purchases
cannot be made without your consent.
SASG Products * MotjieWB ¥ FFTF Tnfr rfrWr n n i i _ f7o«-f'f7TV7fjnn fj rvT * .
Grkt- TV. T Tf&Wti ci ' 1 fi. ,i4 i • ‘ A, 1-ttk 1r.: ? t Met?rr. Uvr gni HOT HIWS . Ju ¦ i i»ii.isiitn&zi nptttr MU s'lffi rvi a • , .. tiwU» AiWltictfti !,i-f e;: i-jtcuLfc vii ur,iri ¦¦ i,.1.'- rr iiiLiridJ; SaJSC I :s : ‘¦'.'Z f ! «t'i2 we&t fo,itut(rtjpHfaUsu ?.vJ :hp.uta.Vwix Ut*.
V- ,-'-t ! U trhttti
* v '¦:¦£ * Ciiat ii.'.c'iij !s 1 t J , 2CXft5Esrart . .
- • - - ¦ ' - : ¦ r-‘
* * "a 6£v»ac teduaiw eCuis ctor*y juu is now ovner
y. CK' '1 r- rr-.'Kcy.-htQOBrj JCiiWfkif
• hi ft ;ri!f»liitulji vMipwriful (crnpwy JH% Ssconats op ill
p*rhctsf S&SX?r tUiKmiry ; • ¦,fjlt*-.*: ft. * f HJ-Itfi KW5
H-J f itMU I +3T5 c ff, iM*r- - vtft* has not been slow to take
advantage of its Web presence - with a Web site you give people
all over the world access to your products and any sen ices
that you care to provide.
SASG has been quick to explore all possible alternatives and it can now offer almost every type of ordering including conventional mail and fax services. A basic e-mail service that allows users to e-mail their credit card number to SASG is also present and additional protection is available in the form of PGP protected mails.
For an even more secure form of ordering, there are now facilities to use an SSL capable browser to safely send your credit details in an encrypted message. For added peace of mind, a final option is to use FirstVirtual. This is the first Internet bank, providing a near 100 per cent secure system of ordering products over the Internet using a credit card.
FirstVirtual is so safe because your credit card details are never actually transmitted . -'icjjiyiic: ?c*sjabwtud»Yb rr.. |*‘yv..pa4o£*.Ki»!t tArfot (tf ttajlHfJiwjrj i m til trr. Vat** TJ31 if JvU ' i (St J .
I. :; (Iitlti '11 I trirtKOir.w.- ¦„ j.'.. JW* fcHWi ti Ww v i
tviuaujnsnl'yv.j*i*jlaafrr!:' Tuiivtiirvtt.
- r--r.r-i=? turii ! Mm 3 .Ww,Xrt- J lla'-tr iiij.rrr. ::cjKt
rr'.'n tu6
- .iffciat tnpifasrvift Qhat's magic mo .... 7 Wrfroms*
SEJiTiCES I think MagicWB is really a very cleverly disguised
computer virus. If you took at how quickly it can jump from
machine to machine, there could be no other explanation. To
quote Amiga Magazine, "You'll think you have just bought
another computer!" MagicWB transforms your lifeless two
dimensional Commodore icons into more dynamic 3-D ones, with
a general stone granite feel to them.
One last note. If you were wondering who the artistic genius behind MagicWB is, it is Martin Huttenloher the same person who designed the SASG Web site, so it is no wonder they both look so impressive.
C'jp r.chi 1991-57 ‘¦Irtri.JCirvvh r 'Sliow Prevww Ocwnlcflff Vs . Df-fiio Prorfti'f No wonder the whole site looks so good, it is done by the man behind the MagicWB icon set "...you'll think you just bought a new computer!"
Amiga Computing perfect couple It’s a combination of Mega Lo Mania and Settlers Gee do you remember Mega Lo Mania ? 'The production run's completed'. We can have a voice mimicing frenzy now.
Is fiac* Once agon you c*n derm* pleasure bouncing pretend balls around a table :nat ooesn'l really exist Hoo-RAH.
Swim?
It's an action adventure game.
David wades through 2,000 post it notes on his desk to find a joystick to play it.
For the serious Amiga user For the Amiga gamer miga Review is a mail-order magazine dedicated to the serious side of the Amiga market. If you're interested in the more productive usage of the Amiga then this is the magazine for you.
A Currently on issue five, the main cover feature looks at the future of the Amiga. We talk to the companies behind the Amiga market, speak direct to Petro Tyschtshenko. And more importantly, find out what you, the Amiga users want.
We give you tutorials on everything from OctaMED to AMOS and C. We have regular columns dedicated to DTP, Coding, the internet, the world wide web. Amiga hardware. Art & Graphics, Music and Business. Amiga Review is now on issue five, and with a cover price of £1.60, what are you waiting for? Got an Amiga? Get Amiga Review. If you don't, we'll -I- ' | just be very upset and cry. HE' IE1 * miga Gamer is the magazine for Amiga games players. In fact it's the only magazine available for Amiga games players. That means we have a monopoly! Wahey.
A Every issue, we spoil you with the latest in essential gaming news, in-depth interviews (‘Do any of you have beards?' We asked Andrew Reed of Alive Mediasoft), previews of the newest games ('Gilbert Goodmate? Would you be seen buying a game with this name?' We said, strangely enough, of Prelusion ‘s Gilbert Goodmate), reviews, columns, letters (Isabelle Rees is back!) And more. We’re more fabulous than any games magazine there ever was.
Ever. So, if you want non-stop Amiga games information delivered to your door then a gy j Amiga Gamer should be your [Wj only choice. For only £1.50. 21 Order now r?
Name_ Address Postcode Country_ Please send this form to MediaSoft Magazines, Communications House, Isle of Wight. P037 7LU.
Or call 01983 8673770r visit http:f www. Mediasft. Demon.co. uk ARMagazine arindex.html Please send me (tick box) ? Amiga Review Trial Copy £1.60 ? Amiga Gamer Trial Copy £1.50 ? Amiga Review and Amiga Gamer Trial Copy £3.00 ? Three issue trial subs to Amiga Review £4.60 ? Three issue trial subscription to Amiga Gamer £4.50 ? Three issue trial subs to Gamer and Review £9.00 Please make cheques and Pos payable to MediaSoft Magazines lfc ¦ 4 i * i t i i ¦ Telling it khi it Onyone who happens to read The Times or The Daily Telegraph or their on-line equivalents may have heard of a chap called
David Hewson. He's a novelist and computer journalist who wrote a column for the former publication which was subsequently published on the Internet. In this he managed to anger just about every non-Wintel computer user in the world by claiming they all used "Zombie" machines which should have been buried years ago.
Every remaining Amiga user knows that the onslaught of the Wintel "standard" has been frighteningly rapid and overpowering.
Users of platforms like the Amiga and the Macintosh know their machines have a lot left to offer, but the vast majority of newcomers to the computing world have no knowledge of the vital roles these machines played in computing history and the user- friendly alternatives they offer to Wintel clones.
Dave Cusick assesses whether the Amiga can realistically play a significant role in the computing world of the future Hewson claimed that "a tiny minority" of computer users are foolishly ignoring the "industry standard" by refusing to switch to Windows Pcs. Although the Telegraph subsequently identified the machines in question ("Acorn computers, the Atari ST, Pcs running Linux or OS 2, the Amiga"), Hewson insists that the original article referred primarily to Acorn machines - possibly highlighting further his curious ignorance of the machine we all love.
Hewson doesn't pull any punches. As the Telegraph feature pointed out, in the past he's called Linux a "nasty piece of digital scurf" and a "program from hell" suitable only for "bug-eyed computer users" whose idea of fun was to "dream in hexadecimal" He's also criticised the Apple Macintosh extensively, and has even gone so far as to call Acorn users "Confused, wacky people, a little like the Tranmere Rovers supporters' club, only less numerous and twice as mouthy". Rather harsh assessments of genuine computer enthusiasts and sweeping generalisations like these have, unsurprisingly,
helped ensure his e-mail in-box has been full of flames over the last few months.
Hewson claims that these days there is no valid reason for not investing in a Windows PC, and that the non-Wintel fans who say otherwise are kidding themselves. Some unlikely candidates have leapt to his defence too - including Stewart Campbell, the former managing editor of Amiga Power magazine, who told the Telegraph that many Amiga fans have a "siege* mentality" that is "over the top" When I originally found out about Hewson's ranting I e-mailed him and pointed out several reasons why I believe that he is wrong to write off machines like the Amiga, and some of these points I feel are
worth raising here.
MSSimS As a former writer for ST User magazine I've been around when a machine has been in its death throes, but the situation regarding the Amiga is rather different.
Thanks primarily to the continuing loyalty of genuine Amiga fanatics, a hard core of companies that still develop for the machine and the vocal Amiga community on the Internet, the machine still has a presence - even if it is far less than at the height of its popularity.
As Macintosh users will testify, it's not just stubbornness that prevents non-Wintel users from embracing the Microsoft dream Join CUCUG and Win!
C**«l C*rft 0*M *04 trtft fs* Uo«Ul f*«¦*. Mtmts ¦» * H JAVA [OTTlMjlKtuMlltMt.
Phases gxpands Powertjp BmteLfovwwa WEB DIRECTORY cilcKBQflM US!
ApjHtt Gfotg?
The Amiga's best drectory."
Amiga News is a great on-line resource you might want to turn to after AC has gone... is the Amiga Web Directory Amiga Computing aso
V. Microsoft Cctpaction Home Pege; Welcome to Microsoft -
Netscape frte £djt J£«w fio £ommurticatof Help 1) Sh» & s Back
3 flekwd £ $ eo**y a Irfctt Pint 5 each BaJmwriu t
lotafcortfwn Ww tr»w cWdtJaJ fcap i H HrrtUllOH ' |
PR| PUCI JtAHC lurroui j Jni»F ] •Will u» Micmsott SlwSKw
Whewjjo you imrrt to [y Microsoft The Intone!
W LrtUo This FREE Web version of ou» best-selling multimedia encyclopedia features more than 16,000 eipedly written articles backed up with more than 2,200 photos, illustrations, maps, chads and tables ttitrewft Baakatl 3D ani Aga of Emfikirc Win i At E3 m Atlanta, a panel of editors from the top gaming publications selected Microsot Baseball 30 as the Best Spods game and Age of Empires the Best Real-Time Strategy TrHt Him AydilflfrlCLYtofU AtoftHtss-UilftJ Resource Editor operates entirely withm the Visual Basrc integrated development ermronment It’s actable free to registered owners of
Visual Basic 50 News for You IT Escwtiw Sy .gm Pro Small BuSmss HprngPcramfl!
Cormryting Games EdMcatiM If you get really desperate for information you could always check out my Web site... iaJ CvPqiTtt IttrcitosftB Ngwj?isiifti.ShftW£yw Featuring hs J J * DocurenfcOo* BSfartj 3gArjc;osof..,|lggMicrosol ' internet... | £jDemon2 [ jjjScreen T.„ |tvjsf 00:04 Although it may pain loyal Amigans, it’s time to accept that Microsoft has become too strong to simply dismiss, or even to challenge head on. In the future Gateway 2000 is going to have to find new strengths upon which to base Amiga marketing eb Sites of Interest David Hewson's Web Page -
http: www.hewson.demon.co.uk Gateway 2000 UK - http: www.gw2k.co.uk Haage & Partner - http: ourworld.compuserve.com homepages Haage_Partner Sun Microsystems - http: www.sun.com Java FAQ - http: www-net.com java faq Dave Cusick's Web Page - http: www.dcus.demon.co.uk of total uniformity, it's also a genuine belief that the computer world should not ignore a machine which, if not technically superior any more, remains more intuitive, more user-friendly, more flexible and less power- hungry.
Whereas the constant-upgrade mentality and "Bloatware" are now accepted in the PC field, Amiga developers still thoughtfully write software which, while making the most of advanced machine features where available, will run perfectly happily on relatively inexpensive systems.
Admittedly the Amiga is in need of technical development, not having moved on significantly for five years now. But the new Amiga owner, Gateway 2000, is the first company since the Commodore era with sufficient resources to fund this development (even if Commodore did rather less development than it ought to).
There will always be enthusiasts eager to upgrade their machines using specialist boards from companies such as Phase 5 - and I'm one of them, hankering after a PowerUp board for my A1200 - but these boards are not going to appeal to the mass market or those who aren't "in the know".
If a potential buyer was to walk into a high-street computer shop, the chances are they wouldn't see a single Amiga - and in the improbable event that the shop assistants even knew what one was, they would w be unlikely to be able to lay their hands on anything other than a plain vanilla A1200, a machine which originally appeared in 1992 and has not been updated or improved since. The only other machine in the currently available Amiga range is the almost- as-ancient A4000, and there are probably now only a handful of mail-order firms in the UK which could supply one.
Having said that, even today the standard A1200 represents reasonably good value for money. It's not possible to get on the Internet with a low-end Pentium PC for less than around £800, but you could pick up an A1200, a 33k6 modem and a copy of Net- connect for a little less than that and, if cash was tight, you could always skimp on the monitor in favour of a television set. Indeed, it is the Internet which I believe has been a key force in helping the Amiga survive this long, and which I think must play a significant role in its future if that future is going to be a bright one.
But even the Internet cannot alone guarantee the survival of the Amiga. In common with an increasing number of Amiga Neti- zens I see Sun Microsystems as being its potential saviour, however unlikely that might sound. Far more than simply being a means of producing fancy Web pages, Sun's Java technology offers the possibility of running powerful Java-authored applications from software industry heavyweights such as Corel and Microsoft on any system for which a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) is available.
With the imminent release of Haage & Partner's Merapi, the Amiga will have its first JVM before even Windows 95 has a reliable and popular one. If Haage & Partner get it right, the Amiga could find a new niche as an affordable machine on which to run heavyweight applications without the need for heavyweight hardware. This will give the Amiga an advantage over the similarly- priced NetPCs now being pushed by companies such as IBM and, of course, the Amiga will still be able to do everything a "proper" PC can do, whereas NetPCs won't.
Gateway 2000's role must surely be to seize the opportunity and push the Amiga as it hasn't been pushed for years.
David Hewson is right when he says that universal compatibility is the way forward, but he's wrong to claim that switching to Wintel boxes is the only way of achieving this compatibility. Java technology means that users can select the native operating system of their choice, and yet still make use of cutting-edge, heavyweight applications - even Microsoft has seen this, hence its rumoured moves to produce 100 per cent Java versions of industry standard packages such as MS Word.
If the computer world wakes up to the fact that there is an affordable machine which can run that package, while simultaneously splitting CPU time between raytrac- ing an animation and downloading a file from an FTP site, then there may yet be a future for our beloved Amiga.
Amiga Computing WEACCEPT Mastercard Visa, Delta and Switch
2. 5% Surcharge on Credit cards, Not Switch Delta Whit e_
Knight _Tech CompuServe.Com AMIGA & Video Editing Specialists
FREEPOST ANG6387, WARE, HERTS, SG11 1YA Fax 01920 822 302 BLI
ARD We Supply The Entire Range of Accelerators & Graphics
Cards From phase5 BUI ARD 68k Series Accelerators V Mkll
cmttisiom.
040 40 ERC For A3000 A4000 CYBERSTORM MK2 68060, 50MHz £ 399 68040, 40MHz £ 245 SCSI-2 Controller £ 65 For A1500 & A2000 BLIZZARD 2060 & 2040 68060, 50MHz + SCSI £ 399 68040, 40MHz + SCSI £ 245 For A1200 Only BLIZZARD 1260,1240,1230 68060, 50MHz £ 325 68040, 40MHz, Needs tower £ 195 68030, 50MHz £ 95 SCSI Controller £ 65 FPU for 1230-IV £ 45 BU£ARD For A1500 & A2000 150MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 with 68060, 50MHz £ 759 with 68040, 40MHz £ 589 with 68040, 25MHz £ 559 180MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 with 68060, 50MHz £ 839 with 68040, 40MHz £ 669 with 68040, 25MHz £ 639 200MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 with
68060, 50MHz £ 929 with 68040, 40MHz £ 759 with 68040, 25MHz £ 729 Also available without 040 or 060 PPC ME-: PPC 4*W£Ft AMIGA™ COBS POWERPC' ©TEBEPBSBCa r r%w*+ For A3000 & A4000 150MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 with 68060, 50MHz £ 739 with 68040, 40MHz £ 569 with 68040, 25MHz £ 539 180MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 with 68060, 50MHz £799 with 68040, 40MHz £ 639 with 68040, 25MHz £599 200MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 with 68060, 50MHz £899 with 68040, 40MHz £729 with 68040, 25MHz £669 &70WERWP* Phase 5 PPC Accelerators are also available without a 68K CPU, for existing 030, 040 or 060 accelerator owners. Call us for
further details.
If you already have a Cyberstorm or Blizzard, please call us for special upgrade prices, 150MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 No 68k Series CPU £ 495 180MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 No 68k Series CPU £ 565 200MHz PPC 604e & SCSI-3 No 68k Series CPU £ 655 .PPC Details to be announced. Call BujBUZZARD 6Q3»* own Qti» For A1200 Only 175Mhz PPC 603e & SCSI-2 with 50MHz 68030 £ 345 without 50Mhz 030 £ 305 200Mhz PPC 603e+ & SCSI-2 with 68060, 50MHz £ 649 with 68040, 40MHz £ 479 with 68040, 25MHz £ 449 No 68k Series CPU £ 399 24-Bit Graphics Card For A1500 2000 3000 T) 4000(T) CYBERVISION 64 3D £149 CV 64 3D
Scandoubler £ 65 CV 64 3D MPEG Decoder £ 119 2 Quantum £ 1 99 SCSI SCSI SC to Scfi- sc i I- S 3I S SI SCSI SCSI
1. 2Gb
2. 1Gb
3. 2Gb
4. 1Gb
4. 2Gb
4. 3Gb
4. 5Gb
9. 1Gb
9. 1Gb ¦2 Seagate £ 249
• 2 Quantum £ 309 2 Micropolis £ 569 ¦2 IBM £ 529
• 2 various £399
• 2 Micropolis £619 ¦2 ibm £ 999 ¦2 Micropolis £1029 Hard Drives
(3.5”) Bare E-IDE - For Amiga 4000 These drives are NOT
suitable for A1200 £ 145 £ 159 £ 175 £ 195 £215 £ 275
1. 2Gb E-IDE 1,6Gb E-IDE
2. 1Gb E-IDE
2. 5Gb E-IDE
3. 1Gb E-IDE
4. 0Gb E-IDE Hard Drives (2.5") Bare E-IDE - For Amiga 1200
1. 0Gb E-IDE Lower Price £165
1. 4Gb E-IDE £179
2. 1Gb E-IDE £289 Cable, S W & Screws £ 9 Only when purchasing
drive !!
CDROM Drives (Bare) Internal Fitting - NOT for A1200 8 x Speed SCSI-2 £119 12 x Speed SCSI-2 £139 SCSI-2 CD Writers f» £ 299 8 x Speed ATAPI IDE £ 79 12 x Speed ATAPI IDE £ 89 16 x Speed ATAPI IDE £ 99 Cartridge Drives (SCSI) ZIP 100Mb Ext. + Cable & Term £ 149 ZIP 100Mb NEW Internal £ 149 ZIP Disks (Now x 6) £ 79 JAZ 1Gb E*t. + Cable & Term £ 399 JAZ 1Gb Internal 3.5" version £349 JAZ Disks (x 3) £ 249 DAT Drives (SCSI-2) 2Gb HP Internal + Fitting Kit £499 2 4Gb HP internal + Fitting Kit £549 4 8Gb HP Internal + Fitting Kit £749 New Lower Prices Memory SIMMS 4Mb, 72 pin, 70ns £ 25 8Mb, 72
pin, 70ns £ 40 16Mb, 72 pin, 60ns £70 32Mb, 72 pin, 60ns £120 Genlocks Hard Drives (3,5”) Bare SCSI-2 & ULTRA LOLA 2000 svhs & vhs £ 349 LOLA 1500 vhs omy £ 179 SIFtiUS SVHS & VHS Plus Audio & Chroma Key.
Software control. £699 NEPTUN As Sirius, but without audio & Chroma Keyer. New £ 529 Fax Modems
28. 8K External £ 59
33. 6K External £ 99
56. 6K USR Sportster £219 Networking AM1GANET Ethernet £175
ARIADNE Ethernet £179 Amiga 1200 Ethernet £ 149 Monitors 17”
Microvitec 1701 £399 14” Microvitec 1438S £219 17” Hi-Res
SVGA £439 15” Hi-Res SVGA £199 14” Hi-Res SVGA £165 Amiga
Software SCALA MM400 £199 SCALA MM20Q PC Version £ 199 ART
EFFECT 2 £149 MAIN ACTOR BROADCAST £169 AMIBACK 2 Backup S W
£ 39 CLARISSA Professional V3 £ 179 ADORAGE V2.5 £109
MONUMENT DESIGNER V3 £239 MONUMENT CREATIVE CD £ 69 ANIMAGE
V1 £ 99 ADORAGE MAGIC Movieshop £ 69 ADORAGE MAGIC Casablanca
£ 69 Miscellaneous H W PICASSO IV 24-Bit Graphics Card with
Flicker Fixer £ 289 Specifications ?
If you need technical details on any of our products, call on 01920 822 321 We Still Support The AMIGA Farewell Amiga Computing Look Out For Our Adverts In CU AMIGA MAGAZINE From now on Guildhall Leisure Services Ltd £19.99 Software amiga ) Q) U 0) £ 52 0) £19.99 The latest in the classic Deluxe Paint range.
The ultimate office package.
1 Software Software 3 bo Sensible Golf Cannon Fodder 2 Dune 2 Cannon Fodder Overlord Available from Electronics Boutique, GAME & all good independents.
E-Mail: guildhall@glsukok.deirion.co.uk Web Sice: http: www.glsukok.demon.co.uk FIND OUT MORE ABOUT OTHER TITLES IN THE GUILDHALL RANGE. CALL OUR INFOUNE NOW ON: 0891 227355 Calls charged at 5Qp per minute at all times.
The lack of any batch downloading and off-line reading abilities is a shame and is something that does need addressing. If it comes to spending 10 minutes downloading files or spending an hour on-line, I think you may go for the first option.
What annoyed me about this news readers is its handling of multiple parts binaries.
I have yet to see a browser that makes a good job of collecting these parts together, or generally automates the downloading and decoding of the parts, but then that is a general fault of most news readers and not just New York.
So, New York, this is version one so there is a long way to go. To be honest, adding the simple batch downloading of NewsAgent would make a big difference.
Bottom gate but a little harder to flip throught the subjects Othink it is a sad reflection on the current Amiga scene that so much time and effort is being put into developing these Internet tools. I forgive the mad dash for an Amiga browser, that is as about as exciting as the Internet gets but really, a news reader?
In reality there are only three real reasons people use newsgroups. Firstly to get dirty pictures, the best way to get people to register a news reader is not to allow them access to the alt groups, as discovered by the writer of NewsAgent. The second reason is to allow small minded people to argue with each other over the most trivial of points. 1 wouldn't mind but most of the people that inhabit newsgroups cannot even put together a coherent argument, never mind respond correctly to one.
The final reason is quite a respectable one, to get information or answers to a question. As newsgroups are an open forum, however, one of the lovely people from group two could always jump in. If they do, just ignore them, think of them as that drunk on the bus.
This review is of New York, a new Class- Act based newsgroup reader. I would expect most people to be using either Tin, NewsAgent or a combination of the two for their news browsing pleasure. Together they do make a good combination, Tin for off-line reading and NewsAgent for batch downloading or on-line browsing.
Batch downloading is an important ability for a news reader as it allows dial up users to log on, get all the messages they are interested in, log off and then read the downloaded articles. This obviously saves time being on-line, as you can then take your time reading and replying to articles while off-line.
So New York does have a bit of competition to contend with. From the start you can tell this is not an off-line reader as you have to have to be on-line before it will run, bit of a give away that.
In use as an on-line reader, the current version of New York does a reasonable job.
You can subscribe to groups added either from a downloaded groups list or a group's name entered by your good self. You can then get a list of subject headers and, from there, read and reply to postings, or if it is a binary uuencoded file the file will be decoded to the New York directory.
If you can be bothered, New York will download a complete newsgroup list. While this can be helpful to track down some of the more unusual groups, it will take at least 15 minutes as there are tens of thousands of groups, and even the file containing their group headings is over a megabyte.
Once you have the list, New York does makes a good job of displaying it. Using a cascading style list, groups under the same heading are grouped in collapsible folders, much the same as Mac list views.
New Agent works alright as an on-line reader, but really 1 am not very keen on the single interface. The view for the groups and subject headers is far too small and you cannot resize it, either through the interface or via the preferences, but a separate window would be best.
What the hell, I can mention the Spice Girls if I want, it's the last issue. 1 like Victoria I do |- JIW Product details Product New York Supplier Finale Development Price S35 E-Mail: lnfo@Finale-Dev.com WWW: www.Finale-Dev.com S Ttfll Ease of use 90% Implementation 60% Value For Money 65% Overall 70% Amiga Computing Oast month I was going a little crazy over ArtEffect From the quick look at the preview it seemed pretty incredible, but now I have managed to have a good old dig around and get a proper idea of just how good, or bad, ArtEffect 2 really is.
Version 2 adds a couple of very important new features. Firstly it has internal virtual memory, essentially this should allow you to work on images of any size. Unfortunately this does not work quite so well in practice for ACA users, as there still are chip RAM limitations - limiting you to around 800x600 pixels. The second new part is layers, but you should read the box out to learn more about them.
One part of ArtEffect that needs work is the way selections are handled. Currently, selections (and also layers) are very much static - in no way can you move them. It is always useful to be able to 'nudge' selections, particularly when superimposing layers, as you are never happy with the first position.
True enough you can go through the brush manager to pick up a selection as a brush and then position it that way. This does work very well, but seems an odd way of going about it. In my humble opinion, a move tool would do the job much better - it works for Photoshop.
If you take my layer tutorial for example.
Once you have slapped down the flower image it is pretty much stuck in place (unless you are prepared to cut the image back off the layer and reposition it). If you could copy Some bloke called Neil reviews ArtEffect 2 over the selection and move it around everything would be so much easier.
You may have noticed that my enthusiasm for ArtEffect has subsided a little as some of the limitations become evident. ArtEffect has a lot of potential, all the right elements are in place, it just needs a little more spit and polish before it is a first class program.
Ekvttami Everyone seems to be comparing ArtEffect with Photoshop, which is fair enough and, with the addition of layers, the likeness will be even more obvious. It's one thing to say ArtEffect is like Photoshop, but is it as good as Photoshop?.
Sure, the interface is court-inducingty close to Photoshop's, so it has the look, but has Haarge and Partner re-created the feel of Photoshop? The best way to find out is to try and reproduce a picture done with Photoshop.
I have used one of the more advanced tutorials from the Photoshop 3 manual that involves knocking together a picture using a few layers and makes full use of the program's selection and drawing tools.
The actual project is to be made up of a number of separate images from the Photoshop CD. Originally most of the images had transparent backgrounds but as these can only be used in Photoshop, they had to change to flat Jpegs which makes using them a little more complicated.
From a picture and mask them out As the flower is generally red on a green background, by using the dropper tool, you can select a range of greens from dark to light and mask out the background - Requirements RED essential BLACK recommended H3 Mb I RAM Hard drive §116 Mbl RAM 30Mb Hard drive mil RTG card 040 CPU Produci f DETAILS Product ArtEffect 2 Supplier Blittersoft Price ArtEffect 1.5: £59.95 ArtEffect 2: £119.95 Tel 01908 261 466 E-Mail sales@blittersoft.com WWW www.blittersoft.com Scores Ease of use 90% Implementation 80% Value For Money 85% Overall 85% PARTI Well, here we are at
the start of the tutorial, I have all the pictures on hand (four in all) and I have the Photoshop tutorial in front of me. Initially, the picture that is going to be the background is loaded and a new layer can be added to the picture in preparation for the flower image that will be the first to be overlaid.
Next I load the flower picture. The first task is to cut out the flower from its green background. Like Photoshop, ArtEffect offers a number of selection tools, for this task the colour selection tool is chosen. This allows you to choose specific or general ranges of colours PART2 When it came to transferring a selection from one image to another, 1 ran into a little problem, ArtEffect simply refused to copy the selected area to the clipboard, it just said it could not. The only way to get the selection is to grab it as a brush and transfer it to the main picture.
This applied to every picture I had to add, as you can see with the next sun image. Load in the pictures, use the magic wand selection to remove the white background, grab the unselected sun area as a brush and then paint this onto a new layer underneath the flower picture, but still over the main background image Amiga Computing PART3 What's all this about then? Well an interesting point is that ArtEffect still uses what looks like the normal IFF-ILBM to save its layered pictures. This means a program such as FastView can still view the background image, but the other layers are stored
in the file as a new alpha block that are simply ignored by programs that do not recognise them, very neat but then the IFF file format is very neat.
One other point - if you notice in the layer window the opacity of the sun layer has been set to 50 per cent, this allows you to make the layer more or less see through. If you look at the times in the top right of the screen grabs, you will probably notice that it took me the best part of a day to do - it's all the ruddy interruptions I get all day PART 4 The next step is to add the leaf to the picture, so you just add a new layer, right? Well in Photoshop, yes, but in ArtEffect no. ArtEf- feet can currently only handle a maximum of three layers, which seems a touch limiting if you ask
me. So before the leaf can be added, a layer had to be freed up, this requires us to merge the flower and sun layers. Very straightforward, just drag the sun layer to the flower layer in the layers window.
Now the third new layer can be made - the usual shenanigans of cutting out the leaf and adding it to the new layer. In Photoshop the leaf would still be a selection you could rotate, but with ArtEffect everything has to be handled as a brush, but this works pretty well. The white outline of the leaf is my fault, 1 should have expanded the selection by a pixel or two to get rid of it, ho hum PART5 In this part a couple of things are going on.
Firstly, if you take a look at the layers window, you will see that I have hidden the flower sun layer, this means any further changes will only affect the leaf and background images. You do this by simply clicking on the light bulb icon.
The second thing going on is that currently the only effect that can be applied between layers is the opacity, in Photoshop a much larger number of operations can be performed. So if you want some sort of image processing performed between images on different layers you have to do it alt by hand. Using the magic wand and selection tool made it easy to single out the overlaying leaves PART6 To help highlight the flower from the rest of the picture, a drop shadow needs to be added underneath it Now in Photoshop this is a piece of cake, or pie, if you're Russian (watch 2010, or read the book
it's better). With Photoshop everything is on its own layer, you can easily grab the flower's outline as a selection, paint it black on a new layer, blur it, merge the shadow and flower layers and Bob's your father's brother.
With ArtEffect all this has to be performed as a separate project, then copy the shadow image as a brush to the new middle layer, sorry 1 merged the leaf and background layers to free the third layer up. Oddly,, filters did not seem to work on the layers, only the background base layer. This meant the blur had to be performed in a separate project not a good feature PART7 The final step. This involves adding the year to the bottom of the pictures and applying a white to transparent gradient to the text.
Sounds simple enough - click text tool, choose CGTriumvirate sized 95 and bold for extra thickness, drag the new text into position and press space to fix the text to the new layer. So far so good, now for the gradient OM M E NT This is where a problem cropped up, how do I do a gradient? Now it is probably my own fault for not looking hard enough, but to set up a gradient you first open the colour manager select range, drag and drop the colours you want in the range. Go to the fill tool, switch to graduate, click where you want the gradient to go and then select the gradient direction.
Transparent gradi- do not seem to be possible, so a white to PART8 The finished picture, the ArtEffect version is on the left and the original Photoshop one is on the right, if you hadn't guessed. To start with the white outline around the leaf is my fault and wouldn't be there if 1 did this again.
Due to ArtEffect's limitation on moving layers and selections, the position of the leaf and sun are wrong and to move them afterwards is very difficult The last major problem is the text, firstly it is not anti-aliased, giving the jagged outline and also no transparency could be applied.
So the main problems encountered are due to the poor selection handling and the current limitations of the layer system. Remember that this was my first attempt to do something substantial with ArtEffect If I had another attempt the finished product would match the Photoshop version much better, save for the text transparency SOFTWARE Kst 1989 THE BEST QUALITY PD & SHAREWARE The LEADER - OTHERS CAN ONLY FOLLOW!
FREE FRIENDLY HELP BY POST or PHONE ANYTIME!
FREE CLUB MEMBERSHIP PICK YOUR OWN PROGRAMS!
BY NAME NUMBER AND SIZE!
ITS EASY!
500k make* 1 bootable disk!
800k makes 1 non-bootable disk!
FREELY UPDATED CATALOGUE WITH FULL DESCRIPTIONS INDEX & VIRUS CHECKER ONLY £1!
Phone for the LATEST PROGRAMS!
1*3 dkks £1-50 4 or more ONLY £1.25!
PO Box 672 Soulli Croydon Surrey CR2 9YS Tel: 0181-657 1617 ROMA Computing Genlocks * Accessories Printers • Monitors • Speakers Complete Amiga PC Systems Support Services • Books File Conversion Photo scon Multimedia • Design • Video 01328 862693 email - diromanet@aol.com web - http: members.aol.com chromane With free software, quiz; info news & inks Tel 01257 400097 Fax 01942 497928 E-Mull: Msiut uu»(" warpxo.uk For a FREE catalogue of the late it and bett In Amiga Public Domain software simply send us your name £ address and a loose Stamp PD prices: I - I 0. Bop; 11-20......70p;
21+......60p Postage A Packing is free on all PD orders Local orders qualify for free delivery All orders are sent First Class and we only use new TDK Fuji disks ' Phone now for details of our Amiga User Group (Wigan West Lancs (Dept AC), 79 Woodnook Rond, Applcy Bridge, Wigan, Lancs WN6 9JR rr Amiga enthusiasts catering for Amiga enthusiasts!
SiSS welcome any enquiries from new and experienced Amiga users alike icBI ura FREE PD SOFTWARE AMIGA - PC - All Commodore Call (0181)651 5436 or Write to 45 Brookscroft, Linton Glade, Croydon CRO 9NA www.icpug.org.uk Independent Computer Products Users Group THE BEST AMIGA USER GROUP IS 15 YEARS OLD!!!!
To celebrate Chic Computer Club is now offering amazing halt price subscription to its unbeatable user Group Service. Members gel great discount offers, thousands of new contacfs, free help & advice, gigabytes of free PD Shareware from our exclusive BBS. Regular newsletter. Second-hand hardware, service Plus: Now also FREE Internet Home Page and E-Mail address, and FREE advertising on cur Internet site.
Plus Full internet Connection for LESS THAN £1.00 per month!!!!
PreUsed 3.5" DS DD Disks just 7p each (+p&p) Find out what you're missing by sending an SAE lor our FREE intro pack to:
C. C.C. (AC18), P.O. Box 121, Gerrards Cross, Bucks, SL9 9JP.
(01753) 884473 We also offer groups for IBM Apple Atari 8
Bits Consoles Fantasy SCI Fi Gamers and Midi Music users
_Trade and Dealer enquiries welcome. Web Page at
HTTP: A,vww.uk-main.co m.'chic_ CLASSIC AMIGA PD software FULL
RANGE OF PD SOFTWARE CD-ROM. CD32 AND ACCESSORIES AMIGA GAMES
AT SPECIAL PRICES PHONE FOR FREE CATALOGUE DISK 0161 723 1638
11 Deansgate, Radcliffe, Manchester Open 12-9pm 7 Days FREE
DISK CATALOGUE Are you finding H hard to get software for your
Amiga? Well hctp is at hand.
We are now In our sixth year of supplying Amiga public domain share* ware and have no intention of stopping.
So why not claim your FREE catalogue, lining all our titles by sending an SAE to: PATHFINDER PD (AMC), 41 Mamn Street, hogley, West Yorkshire BD16 *NQ Tel Fax.- 01274 565205.
Email: Sales Ppathpd demon.co.uk Web site: hltpr rwvAv.pathpd demoh co.uk JUST CHECK OUT OUR PRICIS1 100 Disk labels £1 45; Mouse Mat £1 99 Disk Drive Cleaning Kit £2.50 Have you also gol a PCI Then why not send for our Ua£ package? It contains Windows 95 and Dos versions el the Amiga emulator for the PC plus some Amiga programs to get you going - ONLY £2 (supplied on PC HD disks - Access to an Amiga required) Post & Packing for orders under £6 is just 6Qp and FREE for orders over C6 COMPUTER SYSTEMS & SERVICES Amiga & PC Specialists We oiler a wide ranoe of Amioa & PC Seivices Amiga PD - over
6000 PD Titles - Prices 75p per disk + 50 PSP - Int Floppy & PSU repairs, Business Card. Leaflet & Presentation Design & Printing Service, plus many other Services For Iree Catalogue Disk & Information. CALL Computer Systems & Services 16 Elizabeth House, Durham Ave, Gidea Park, Romford. Essex RM2 6JU CALL 0976 232 939 Amiga Services & Information Please make Cheques & Postal Orders payable to
M. J. Bixby PC & APPLE MAC SERVICES We also provide PC - Repair -
Upgrade & Custom Building Service, for all you PC buffs for
more information CALL Louise 01708 709151, PC ONLY Apple Mac
Services CALL 0850 585 337 SPECIAL RESERVE MEMBERSHIP GIVES
YOU 10 ISSUES OF THE SPECIAL RESERVE CLUB MAGAZINE Our 48 page
full colour magazine, with news, reviews and thousands of
products ALL OF THIS PRICE OVER-RIDG. We can t be beaten on
price by a FULLJEB If our mall order price Is too high, or It
the product you want Is not listad, we'll give you E2_QE£ the
lowest advertised price in this magazine, subject lo stock.
Just phone 01279 600204 and tell our staff the price YOU
expect to pay.
Wi Mswr *i ruMi met Ov«P-*oc Umrntl l*W m ecarvnroiraM'S*™** o* m*-UK waiwrr*- V t« tw TotaLMiereiujoiDWU®* a* UK camwci mo anwi wtv n. Shcuu. Riuim &op nets ut Giufuxnra t2 uw* thm ernes local msvchtv WE GUARANTEE YOUR TOTAL SATISFACTION - OR ALL YOUR MONEY BACK WeLL EVEN COLLECT Lwt4 itt 4 FREE CF OwhAG£ F YOJ AFC MOT SAHWXJX I1K ONAI AM AND DARK SAVIOUR
33. 99 FIGHTERS MEGAMIX 39 99 MANX TT 31% ... .
.,29 99 NIGHTS - JOYPAD 96% - .33.99 ROAD RASH
. .
18 99 SATURN BOM BERMAN 93% 32 99 SHINING THE HOLY ARK 93”% 32 99 theme park 92% 14 ga VfRTUA FIGHTER 2 98% , .14 99 WORLDWIDE SOCCER 97 94% .19 99 BOOKS AWESOME SNES SECRETS 3..... 899 COMPlFTE IDIOTS GUIDE TO THE INTERNET
20. 93 DUNGEON MASTER HINT BOOK ...399 INDIANA JONES AND FATE OF
ATLANTIS HINT GUIDE .. 399 MORE C FOR DUMMIES
26. 99 playstation SECRETS.
STRATEGIES AND SOLUTIONS 15 99 SECRETS OF FRONTIER ELITE 2 999 SECRETS OF SIMCITY 2000 .9 99 SPECIAL RESERVE BOOK OF 1001 CHEATS . -
1. 99 UFO (XCOM) STRATEGIES AND SECRETS ...
.1349 LOGIC 3 JOYPAD
9. 99 AUTOFtRE ALFA MEGAMOUSE 400 13.99 400 DPI 2 BUTTONS LEADS
JOYSTICK EXTENDER CA0LE (3 METERS) T.99 JOYSTICK
SPLITTER CABLE T.99 MONITOR LEAD AMIGA TO CM8633 OR 10045
10.99 NULL MODEM CABLE |25 PIN. 1 8 METRES) 10.99 SCART LEAD
AMIGA TO SCARTTV 10.99 SCART LEAD CD32 TO SCART TV 10.99
14. 99 .7,99 ...5.99 ..899 4 99 . 995 [NINTENDO 64 £139.99
including cotilioHer PLAYSTATION £121.99 indudes tonfralter
and ‘Demo T‘ CD 0% F1HANCE AVAILABLE on telwltd FumrnoH and
*64 dealt A500 Software (HDR) - HARD DRIVE REQUIRED Bl7
FLYING FORTRESS ,14 99 BIG 100(100 GAMES) 9 99 CANNON FODDER
10 99 CANNON FODDER 2 T3.M CENTERFOLD SQUARES 3 99
CHAOS ENGINE 2 92% .19 99 COLONIZATION 13 99 COLOSSUS
CHESS X 4 99 COVER GIRL STRIP POKER
......9.99 CRICKET CAPTAIN 3.99 CRICKET
COLLECTION VOL f INTERNATIONAL ONE DAY CRICKET, TEST MATCH
CRICKET BATTLE FOR THE ASHES . 9.49 CRICKET MASTERS .
, 13 99 DAILY DOUBLE HORSE RACING 3.99 DELUXE PAINT
3 4.99 DESERT STRIKE .11.49 DOGFIGHT
.. . 9,99 DUNE
. 149 DUNE 2 ¦ BATTLE FOR
ARRAKIS ...12.99 EURC LEAGUE MANAGER SMB ..12.99 FI MASTERS
.... 13 99 F117A NlGHT HAY K 9 99 F15 ST RIKE EAGLE II
13 99 R9 STEALTH FIGHTER 14 99 FIELDS OF GLORY 13 99 FOOTBALL
COLLECTION VOL 1 ClUBFOOTBALL CLUB ANOCOUNTRY.
WEMBLEY INTL SOCCER 16.49 FOOTBALL DIRECTOR 2 4 99 FOOTBALL GLORY ......4.99 FOOTBALL MASTERS ...13.99 GULP1 ......* * ...9-M GUNSHIP SOOO 13.99 IMPOSSIBLE MISSION 2025 7.99 KINGPIN . 5 99 MICRO FRENCH |B TO ADULT) . . .22 99 MICRO GERMAN (8 TO ADULT) 22 99 MICRO MATHS (11*) 22 99 MINS lES FURBALLS 10 99 ODYSSEY 6.99 PGA TOUR GOLF 9 49 pinball dreams 13 99 PINBALL FANTASIES . .13 99 RAILROAD TYCOON ...12 99 REACH FOR THE SKIES ...10 99 RUGBY COACH .3.99 SENSIBLE GOLF ...... . . . .12.99 SENSIBLE WORLD OF SOCCER 9f97
18 99 SENSIBLE WORLD OF SOCCER DATA 01SK 96.97 ' 9 99 SETTLERS ... 13 99 SILENT SERVICE 2 ....13.99 SIMON THE SORCERER . 12 99 SPECIAL FORCES 8.99 STAFLORO .. 9-99 SUPER PACK SUPER SKIDMARKS, SUPER TENNIS.
SUPER LEAGUE MANAGER . 16 99 SUPER SKID MARKS ....12 49 FIELDS OF GLORY . GLOOM .... GLOOM DELUXE .... GUARDIAN ..... 9.99 LEGENDS ....12.99 MINSKIES FURBALLS ...10.99 PINBALL PRELUDE .... 17.49 PREMIER MANAGER 3 ..... 5 99 ROAD KILL .9 99 SIMON THE SORCERER 55 49 SLAM TILT ...19 49 SPERIS LEGACY - 15 99 THEME PARK ,, 14.99 UFO - ENEMY UNKNOWN ....13.99 WORDWORTH VS ...34 99 WORMS • THE DIRECTORS CUT .18.99 A1200 DESIGN PACK DESIGN A PRINT PACK FOR A1200 CONTAINS
WORDWORTH 2.0 DELUXE PAINT IV AGA. PRINT MANAGER 05CAR & DENNIS 9.99 CD32 Games ACID ATTACK COMPILATION GUARDIAN. RCADKILL.
SUPER SKIDMARKS . 14.99 ACTION PACK VOL 1 LEGENDS, FEARS, GLOOM ARCADE POOL ...... FIELDS OF GLORY ROAD KILL SPEEDBALL 2 SPERIS LEGACY ACID ATTACK COMPILATION GUARDIAN, R04DKILL- SUPER SKIDMARKS 1499 ALIEN BREED 3D ..... B 99 ALIEN BREED 3D 2 96".
1799 CHAOS ENGINE 2 ... ... 1999 COLONIZATION .... 14 99 FEARS ......9 99 .11.99 999 .21.49 THEME PARK .14.99 TOTAL FOOTBALL 80% 10.99 TRIVIAL PURSUIT (HDR) ....3.99 UFO ENEMY UNKNOWN .13.99 WEMBLEY ¦ RUGBY LEAGUE 5 99 WINGCOMMANOER .9 99 WORDWORTH V1.2 SE .17.99 WORMS 12 99 XP8 1299 ZEEWOLF 2 . ..... 999 A1200 Software PC CD TOP 10 AMIGA EMULATOR .....15 99 CARMAGEDOON (RATED 15) 29 99 COUNTERSTRIKE - RED ALERT DATA CD (REQUIRES RED ALERT) 12.99 DIABLO FOR WINDOWS 95 PENT ...29.99 DUNGEON KEEPER
28-99 IMPERIUM GALACTICA .. ..... 29.99 MOTO RACER WIN95 .... 29.99 PREMIER MANAGER 97 .22 99 THEME HOSPITAL 91% 28.99 X-WING VS TIE FIGHTER WIN95 . 29 99 PLAYSTATION TOP 10 DIE HARD TRILOGY 93% .36.99 EXHUMED ...... 26 99 FADE TO BLACK 90% ......17 99 INTL SUPERSTAR SOCCER PRO 34.99 MICRO MACHINES 3 94% 29 99 RAGE RACER ... 34 99 SOUL BLADE 35 99 SYNDICATE WARS . 34 99 TOMB RAIDER 95% 36 99 V - RALLY .... 38 99 N64TOP 10 blast corps 46 99 FIFA SOCCER ... . 34 99 INTL SUPERSTAR SOCCER 64 ..... 49 99 KILLER
INSTINCT GOLD .46.99 MARIO KART 64 ..51.99 PILOT WINGS 64 90°* 4199 SHADOWS OF THE EMPIRE 90% ..51.99 SUPER MAR 10 64 1 go*. 51 99 TUROK • DINOSAUR HUNTER 97% 55.99 WAVE RACE 64 9?% 46.99 SATURN TOP 10 Buy any one item from our entire catalogue at the same time as joining for a year (£7.50) or more and we'll give you |A FREE COPY OF EDGE MAGAZINE The future of interactive entertainment magazine I Worth £3 50. FREE to new members.
AND THE SPECIAL RESERVE BOOK OF 1001 CHEATS Cheats lor games on most console and computer platforms.
Atl of these fantastic gifts below absolutely free.
FREE AMIGA MEMBERSHIP PACK Zeewolf 1 & 2, Football Glory and Quickjoy footpedals ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO STOCK OTHER OFFERS ARE AVAILABLE OVERSEAS MEMBERS PLEASE ADD E2 POSTAGE EXTERNAL 28.8 FAXMODEM 6999 SMALL COMPACT DESIGN.
Complete with cables.
INTERNET BUNDLE AND FREE STARTER GUIDE ANTI SURGE 4 WAY TRAILING MULTI-PLUG 24.99 ANTI-SURGE 6 WAY TRAILING MULTI PLUG 29.99 INTERNAL DISK DRIVE FOR A120Q A600 39.99 FOR A500 39.99 170MB 2.5” INT HARD DRIVE 79.99 EXTERNAL WSK DRIVE FOR AMIGA OR SX-1
47. 99 Overseas *,_*•! aut,l C2 00 ets mu - eaten c*no kaqwr.
Payable la Special Reserve at mss PO Box B47, Harlow, CM21
9PH We are mainly mall order but we also have § Four
impressive I Special Reserve Shops BnrSIOL Avon Ml Gtoucetnp
R0 1*361 C«tlMSlWH)p Esws *3B«xwnii n An tv, tnts mount
aKT"r,***«Kaw. Ss t atsAtit ms swo 0117 92* SOM 012*53**777
Sswat-'PoewoMTH. Hfnrs t,. MStafiifcas, Non«i«Au i&l OusuRd
Siatdn Row.rim rnt uvMiiTAicn «h»iJ25c* Ml, •£ P.”, Hj’ 01279
600399 OPENS Ssrt 13m AU Tsa hots hi ft i lu PC Hr•* Ikaa* F
aca .ni ? ¦ Wi rt ktus s et i lur HiXhr 11C SM I tun louon *
M M*l [WI At' sjtHMtA cm M wt xtJ nws We GUARANTEE TOTAL
SATISFACTION* Inevitably some products listed may not yet be
available. Please phono to check availability. Prices may
change wrthoul prior notification- SAVE = Saving oN full
tecom-nended price. Sent lo pres* 25,7.97 Errors & Ommisions
Excluded.
Inter-Medialea Lid, The Mailings, Sawbrldgeworlh. Herts CM?l 9PG Special Reserve 01279 600204 0« IW woufl OACCfl ON 01279 725842 - Wfc'LL FA* BACK TO CONFIRM O EN 9.30amto 6nj (Mew-Sat) 10am Io5rm (Sc-N & Bank Hct cat's) We only supply memben but you can order as you Join Trial Membership only 50p trial Merroer, rw*. * one Issue of the club megarine Valid tor orvr order.
Annual Membership (UK) £6.00 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP FEES UK £6.00 EC CIO 00 WORLD 112.00 Mamba'S ten Issues Of Ura colour dub wjltrtf par year, a Ira* copy ol EDGE. Book of 1Q0I Cheats and a choke FREE gift when you Buy any item
• S you f0 n There Is no obligation to buy anything M pot ntik
VAT ml ;,-*}• lo HOST U*. Reruns .wtuti ,TLX CW’kt wmi AUJGJ
COMPUTING jtt» A Arttraia __ Over 300,000 people have joined
Special Reserve.
The biggest games club In the World.
Established 10 years, ipedal Icicrte Is the market leader In mall order home lampufmg vrllh a staff al 10.
Em*» marr-tWap ntr-ter (4 JcpScatfe) or Ntiy ME.WBE.ftVfP ILL (ANNUAL UK It CO, si class post add 50p per Mom For OPTIONAL last dolwy on hsro»«re add £3 OO ALL PFKES INCLUDE UK POSTAGE I VAT [7 Cheque? 0 ¦MaitefcafdCrBdlchaTaSafiCT ViH _ Words of the past, words of the present and words for the future. Nine years of reader letters with I AMIGA Computing Qssue 2 July 1988 why not send them to an happy to listen to all your bundled software which comes with the ST, Every Atari comes with loads, which will cut down the number of new games ST owners will buy, and so makes the Amiga sales look
proportionately better.
Your first issue was great, keep rooting for the world's best computer.
Alex Walshi, Newbury This issue an external drive cost £100, an A500 cost £400, 512K cost £105 and a 20Mb hard drive would set you back £625 Mistakes t enjoyed reading issue one, especially the bit about Workbench 1.3. How much is it anyway? There was an error in the Plain Man's Guide to CLI. The author said that it is important to use capital letters. He is wrong, it doesn't matter whether you use upper or lower case. The Amiga treats it the same.
Now on to the hidden messages. For the last message, you omitted to mention that you must hold down the function key while you eject the Workbench disk and replace it with a none Workbench disk.
Leszek Wolnik-Kurjanowicz, Ealing Piracy problem I was very interested to read in your first issue about the sales of the Amiga catching up with those of the ST. I work in a shop in London where we sell all kinds of computers, and the Amiga runs only to Amstrad Pcs. But ST software outsells Amiga products. I attribute this to the lack of really good Amiga games and the huge amount of piracy on the Amiga.
Don't Write in I Well thanks for all your letter over the years, most have been very complimentary, others have been quite structive, while others have been down right abusive, even so brought a wry smile to all our faces.
If you have any comments on the Amiga i Amiga Doormat as I'm sure Mr Ben Vost gripes, oh yes he will.
Most of the games are straight ST conversions. If I wanted an ST I'd have bought one, but the Amiga has far better graphics and sound. Piracy is a serious problem, and I implore Amiga owners to buy their games and not copy them.
If you have a stolen game which you play a lot, go and buy the original to show the software house how much you appreciate the game.
This is the only way that software houses can be persuaded to carry on supporting the Amiga. One good thing is the Qssue 5 October 1988 Hard discount At last a top quality magazine specifically to support a top quality computer.
Congratulations on your first two issues, and good luck for the future.
Why is it that I can buy a 20Mb hard disk for an IBM PC compatible for about £200, whereas a similar product for the Amiga costs £500? OK, so I know that there are economies of scale and that some components are different, but the majority of the components must be broadly similar - the disk, the controller and so on - but 250 per cent more?
Now if somebody could develop a cheap (£100?) Board that would allow an IBM hard disk card to run on an Amiga... Martyn de Young, Kent Hop to it While on holiday this year doing the rounds of the amusement arcades, I could not get my wife away from a game called Frogger. She normally hates the arcades but loved Frogger. 1 own an Amiga 500 computer and was wondering if you would know how I could obtain this.
D P Bowles, London ssue 20 January 1990 Narrow minded Why isn't the Amiga better known? I bought a modem and was having trouble with using a bulletin board. So I asked the sysop for help, telling him I was using an Amiga 2000. Displaying as much intelligence as a boiled potato, he asked if that was a PC or a modem.
Of course I explained that the Amiga is an advanced 68000 based multi-tasking system with graphics and sound processors which make the IBM look like a bad dream Sir Clive once had. But how do we get it through to the people in suits that the world of computing is much more exciting when you wiggle out of the big blue straight jacket?
Gerry Hall Antrim.
This issue an external drive cost £75, an A500 cost £290, 512K COSt £40, a 20Mb hard drive would set you back £300 and Commodore launch the A2500.
Amiga Computing ssue 10 March 1989 ETTERS Girls in computing I am fed up with the way women are treated in computing. I've got a Bsc in computer science and know what I am talking about. However when 1 go into a computer shop to ask about Amigas, the sales men all talk down to me. I am told how I could use Superbase Personal to keep recipes and how educational it could be.
I know these things. What I want is advice on what compilers are available, what the operating system is like and how to really get the most from an Amiga.
In the end I bought a machine from a cut price mail order company. I would have paid the full price, but only if the company offered decent back-up.
Tanya Al-Rais, Kent Pircay is not a crime Most decent games cost over 20 quid. My friends and I get about half that every week in pocket money. The only way we can afford games is by clubbing together.
But I'm not going to fork out a fiver when my mate Rob gets to take the game home and I don't get to play it. So we copy it. If we didn't we wouldn't buy the games. I don't see why this should be illegal.
Starglider shield Do I detect slight radiation from the planet Argonaut in reply to Omar Farooq's query (Starglider slug January 1989) as to why Starglider II runs slightly slower on the Amiga than the ST?
If you treat the Amiga like an ST it will run slightly slower. It is more sensible to treat it like an Amiga. The whole point about the blitter is that it will co-process with the 68000 if the code is properly written. Used in this way it is very much faster than native 68000 code at screen operations.
Writing portable code to make life easier when you move programs from one machine to another makes commercial sense, but does not have a profound effect on the hardware.
To put it another way: My neighbour's push bike is a hell of a lot faster than my XR3, so long as I don't turn the engine on!
Jim Hawkins, London Issue 82 January |1995 ¦¦ Qssue 86 May 1995 Art for arts sake For some time I have been growing increasingly disenchanted with Amiga Computing, for a number of reasons: The indiscriminate use if irrelevant electronic symbols linking text and headings. To anyone with the slightest knowledge of electronics, the apparent random use of symbols such as a battery, a transistor, a capacitor or other components when completely irrelevant to the text is simply nonsense and misleading.
The typeface generally used for the headings is also irritating and interrupts smooth reading. X and H appear very similar, to mention but one detail, and the whole affect is most unattractive. Your review of PageStream 3 makes me wonder whether I am using the same program. When my copy arrived a couple of weeks ago it was a disaster, to put it mildly, although after two updates from the Net it is a little better.
Qssue 69 January 1994 In addition, the arrival of December issue in mid-October seems utterly ridiculous.
Your review of PageStream 3 makes me wonder whether I am using the same program as you are. When my copy arrived a couple of weeks ago it was a disaster, to put it mildly, although after two updates taken from the net it is certainly a little better.
I have been using PageStream with various updates for some years and have found it excellent until version 3, but surely your marks in 'the bottom line' are somewhat over-enthusiastic to say the least?
This issue an external drive cost £55, an A1200 cost £240, 1Mb cost £20, and a 200Mb hard drive would set you back £200 A helping ear!
I have only been using my Amiga 1200 for a year now and have tried reading numerous magazines. Out of all of them I prefer your magazine as it is easy to read and you give away some excellent disks.
However, I have encountered problems on two of your disks, Easy Amos and Anim Workshop. These, I think, could have been cleared up in a matter of minutes but instead I have to write in with the problem and wait for a reply.
Why don't you have a helpline so you could make things easier for everyone?
This is the only reason 1 have not subscribed to your magazine. Please consider this... Cream crackered 1 hate cream crackers, I really do. Apart from the fact that they always fall apart when you try to butter them and they stick to the roof of your mouth, their butter- smeared flakes are a hell of a job to clean off floppy drives.
I hate four year-old sprogs playing with my disks even more. "OK son, just leave my disks alone or you'll break them. Where's the rest of your cream cracker, the bit you haven't spread all over my disks?"
The next day I found the soggy cracker when I tried to load a game into my Amiga.
Yep you could say the disk drive was literally cream crackered.
The guilty party was confronted with the evidence. "But son, why did you do it?" I asked. "Well," came the reply, "it's the same shape and it did fit." Huh! "Anything fits if it's covered in butter, 1 muttered."
Mother acts for the defence: "Well if you Brian Goodfellow, Northumberland In the past Amiga Computing ran a coverdisk helpline as a permanent feature. However, over recent months we've been running without a full-time coverdisk editor and unfortunately, until this situation is resolved I'm afraid the coverdisk helpline will remain inactive.
However, when a replacement is found, rest assured the helpline will reactivated. If anyone out there is interested in the job feel free to send an application. Please mark your letter RE: coverdisk editor application.
Editors note: So I did apply, and I got the job, and here 1 am today. Funny old world isn't it?
Won't let your kids play with real disks, what else can they play on the Amiga with?"
Good grief! I really do hate cream crackers.
Steve Clarke, Kempston.
Impossible upgrade Will there ever be an upgrade kit for the A500 to make it into an A1200? There was the ECS chip set upgrade and Kickstart 2.04 chip to make it into an A500 plus, so why not another jump up the ladder?
I don't want to get rid of my beloved A500 if I can avoid it, as I have too many peripherals which use the DMA slot. These would be useless on the A1200 unless someone was to produce an adaptor. Any chance of this?
Colin McCrain, Aberdeen This issue an external drive cost £55, an A600 cost £190, 512K cost £20, and a 200Mb hard drive would set you back £300 Amiga Computing 30 OCTOBER 1997
1. Comprehensive Software ALL YOU NEED TO CONNECT AND SURF THE
INTERNET NetConnect provides you will all ycu need to connect
to the Internet - full TCP stack, web browser, mail, news,
ftp, ire and telnet clients. You don't need anything else, no
need to worry about additional software. The CD version even
includes pre-configured MIME-types for web browsing),
datatypes, additional online documentation and more!
VQYAGER-NG Voyager Next Generation Is already powerful with Javascript, frames, tables, SSL (https:) etc!
MICR0D0T-II A superb and brand new commercial email and news client, said lo be the best for the Amiga!
AMFTP The industry standard FTP client and the number one FTP program on the Amlga.
AMIRC Again, tha Industry standard Amiga IRC client ¦ said to be better that fts PC and Mac rivals!
AMTELNETT Use AmTelnet to maintain your web site, connect to external computers, play online games!
NET INFO Nettnlo Is a new program by Oliver Wagner to aearch tha net - traceroule, ping, services etc. AMTERM Am Term is a comms program - conned lo a BBS. Send files to your friends Amlga PC Mac!
2. Commercially Licensed NO SHAREWARE - FULLY UCENSED SOFTWARE
NetConnect is a suite if commercially licensed Internet
software which means there is no need to register any of the
core modules contained within the package - no time
limitations, no hassle. Alt the software contained within
NetConnect are arguably the best in their class.
Net Connect controls the modules wilh a unique floating (or fixed) icon bar (which can be altered and new icons added to the bar) which means everything is just one click away!
NetConnect is, of course, fully supported and the modules contained within Net Connect will be supported by the authors with minor upgrades, enhancements or bug fixes.
NetConnect v2 is even easier to connect to the Internet! Launch the new Wizard GUI. Choose your modem, enter a few user details and let the Wizard do all the rest for you! Simple, with version 2 you don’t even need to worry about the provider - everything is automatic, everything is point and click! Amiga Format concluded about NetConnect v1 (June 97 issue): ‘Almost the perfect package for the Amiga Internet user’, "If you need to get online, this is the easiest way to do if and ’It's good value for money too - especially the burdle including the 33 6K modem " We have listened to our
NetConnect v1 users, noted their comments and added some other new features, NetConnect v2 is available on CD-rom and floppy disk. Specifications include:
- New AmiTCP- NetConnect v2 users will be the first people to use
a version of the new AmiTCP! We have added a number of changes
to this new version - the main additions are the new Wizard.
MUI based dialler and ‘events' control.
- AmiTCP Wizard • makes configunng your ISP a doddle.
Choose your modem, enter some user details and then the rest of the process is completely automatic! This is Irue WindowsQS™ style connectivity! See the two example pictures - point and click Internet configuration!
- New programs - Nettnfo and X-Arc (X-Arc is a brand new WinZIP'™
style archive management tool. Downloads lha lzx files from
Voyager AmFTP Microdot-ll, aulo-extracls them into X-Arc's GUI
and allows you to conlrol the files.
- Programs are now koyfilo based (can be used with any TCP stack
- Miami etc)
- Extras pre-configureci MIME types (CD onty), datatypes (CD
Only), online help files etc
- Updated, latest versions of the modules (Voyager.
Microdot-ll, AmlRC, AmFTP etc)
- Printed installation introduction guide - install NetConnect
quickly and easily
- Printed manual - using the Inlernet and NetConnect
- Plus many more smaller changes and additions
3. After Sales Support THE BEST FREE SUPPORT - GUARANTEED We pnde
ourselves in offering superb after sales support to all our
NetConnect lnternet users. We guarantee you will not get
better free Internet related support from any other nval
company. Support via telephone (Mon-Fri 1Qam-6pm), e-mail,
mailing list (general NetConnect forum) and the web site
(www.amigawor1d.com netconnect). Our aim is to help users with
their internet connection after they have purchased Net
Connect and we understand that the Internet can be a daunting
experience for the beginner, tssue 2 of our Internet magazine
'Internet Informer' should be available within September.
This is a quarterly magazine with the latest information about the Internet and your Amiga - NetConnect users receive this magazine free of charge!
STFax Professional£29.95 STFax Professional is new commercial fax program for the Amiga containing the sort of advanced fax features you would find within commercial PC fax software. STFax has been in the shareware for the last few months, and the brand new commercial 'professional" version offers even more advanced features plus some voice control for voice modems.
• Support for all modem classes (1, 2. 2.0}
- Voice control * use your Amiga as a digital answer machine etc!
- Phonebook (store all your favourite fax numbers)
- Scheduler (store fax messages to be sent at specified times)
- Reports
- Arexx port
- Datatypes support for image conversion
- Printer driver to redirect all print-outs to a fax file (print
from Wordworth, Pagestream elc!)
- Viewer for viewing outgoing incoming fax messages
- Plus many more features Wizard - Loginscript Recorder
NetConnect V2 CD Mains many eiliaa: datatypes, MIME types (for
warw browsing) and much irorel NetCcnnect 1 2 Floppy Disks
lonly contains the cere programs S onlice help decumentsl
NetConnect V2 Upgrade from v1 v1.1 [registered hetCo-ne:!v1V1.1
users ortyj £52.95 £54.95 £call!
High Speed Serial Cards £44.95 from., The Hypercom range of high-speed serial cards offer your Amiga the fastest connection to the Internet, for comms and for fax transfers. Available for the Amiga 1200 (these serial cards are placed within a previously unused expansion port - leaving the PCMCIA port and trapdoor free!) And zarro-ll lll based machines (zorro version suitable for A3000 4000 or a A1200 lower), High-speed buffered parallel option available. These cards are currently the fastest serial cards available for the Amiga, making the Internet work faster for you!
Model Machine Specifications Price Hypercom 1 A1200 1 x 460,800bps highspeed buffered serial port £44.95 Hypercom3 A1200 2 * 460,600bps highspeed buffered serial ports £79.95 1 x 500K bytes sec buffered parallel port Hypercom3Z Zcxro-ll 2 x 460,800bps highspeed buffered serial ports £79.95 1 i 500K bytes sec buffered parallel port Various Modem Pack Options Latest Technology Modems K56Hex modems are here! Download software and web pages uptc 1wlQe the speed of a 28.8 modem. 56k modems will operate at 33.6K speeds for uploading but you can cut your phone bills drastically when using the 56K
technology! Isn't it about time you upgraded that 14.4 or 28 8 modem? For further information about the new K56Flex (Rockwell developed) technology contact us!
We only supply quality branded modems (Dynalink UK Ltd), which may cost slightly more than their unbranded competitors, but they ship with a 5 year warranty, the knowledge that a Hypercom 3 UK company offers support information and you are buying a modem with quality (Rockwell based) components.
K56Fiex modems need to connect to another K56Flex modem in order to use 56K technology (make sure your provider supports K56Flex technology). Call for further technical details.
Various money saving packs are available. These are all based on either the 33.6k or 56k modem plus a a collection of extras. Call us for other pack options if you have your own pack idea!
CODE PACK CONTENTS PRICES £ PK01 33.6 Modem & STFax £ 89.95 PK02 33.6 Modem & NetConnect £109.95 PK03 33.6 Modem & NetConnect & STFax £119,95 PK04 33.6 Modem & NetConnect & Hypercoml & STFax £149.95 PK05 33.6 Modem & NetConnect & Hypercom3Z & STFax £159.95 ADD £25 for a 56k Modem (instead of the 33.6k model)
• All packs come with one month free connection to a major
Internet Service Provider
• Other options may be available - call
• Choose between the CD or Floppy disk version of NetConnect with
your modem pack
• STFax Professional will be despatched on release
- Quality branded Dynaink modem (supported by Dynalink UK Ltd) ¦
33600 bps DATA FAXVOICE modem - true v34. Throughput to 115,200
BPS via V.42 b*s data compression
- Group 1. 2 & 3 send'recetve FAX (14,4)
• Voico Commands - DSVD upgradeable (by software)
- Auto Answer
• Full Duplex Speaker
• Call Discrimination
• Fax on demand
• Simultaneous voice and data (S.V.D)
• Message playback via sound card I speaker or headset
- Auto mode detection allows modem to connect with a modem that
is configured Tor differing connection mooes
• Extended AT (Hayes compatible) command set
• Upgradable ROM chip (safeguarding against future
specifications)
• BT and CE Approved ¦ Amiga 25pin and Surf SquirtrrtAPC 9pm
senal cable included ¦ With Headphones and Microphone
- 5 year warranty - also undergone rigorous Amiga tests Send your
order to: Active Software, PO Box 151, Darlington, County
Durham, DL3 8YT, ENGLAND.
POSTAGE DELIVERY rsi 01325 352260 active@enterprise.net
- 50p per CD for UK delivery
• £1 per CD for EU delivery
• £2 per CD World delivery ¦ £3 for 2-3 day delivery ¦ £5 for
next day delivery
• £15 for Saturday delivery WANT MORE INFORMATION?
We provide an Information pack covering NetConnect and the modules (Voyager, MD-2 etc), the modems we offer, connectivity discounts and a sot of frequently asked questions and answers. Ask us to send you an Info packl VAPORWARE PRICES If you arc not interested in buying NetConnect, you can still buy Vaporware Products individually: Voyager Next Generation £20.00 Microdot-ll £18.00 AmlRC £18.00 AmFTP £18.00 AmTalk £12.00 AmToinel + AmTcrm Package Deal £18.00
• 5% Discount when 2-4 Vapor products are bought. F0% Discount
for 5*
- Note that the Vaporware products are e-mail only but can be
sent on floppy for a surcharge of £2.00 per product.
* Other Vapor titles available * http: www.vapor.com tor further
information only 55UE5 Missed an issue of Amiga Computing?
Do not fear! Simply fill in the coupon and one will be winging its way to your doorstep!
Back issues order Form Simply send a cheque or postal order for just £4.50 made payable to IDC Media.
The magic address is Amiga Computing Back Issues, IDC Media, Media House, Adlington Park, Macclesfield, SK10 4NP.
Please allow up to 28 days for delivery.
? Issue 99 - May 1996 £1.00 J Issue m - April 1997 £4.50 ? Issue 114-July 1997 £430 ? Issue 102 - August 1996 £1.00 Li Issue 112- May 1997 £4.50 ? Issue 115 - August 1997 £4.50 ? Issue 106 - December 1996 £1.00 j Issue 113 - June 1997 £4.50 ? Issue 116 - September 1997 £4.50 Name Address.
Post code Tel j | Please tick if you do not wish to receive further information or special offers.
Special Offer: 1996 issues only £1 while stocks last Amiga 1200 Magic Packs AMIGA: International, Inc. JUJU 68020 14.3mz 2m RAM Ai Last, the Amiga is BACK ON SALE with NEW machines from Amiga International Inc. 68020 14,3mhz All machines are full UK Specification and come bundled with WordWorih v4SE (Word 6mb RAM Processor), TurboCalc v3.5 (Speaosheet), DataStore vl.l (Database), PhotoGenig vl.2SE j JQ q & Personal Pajnt v6.4, Organiser v 1.1. Pinball Mania, Whizz and now .....- Directory Opus 4.121 ScALA MM300 68030 40mz 10m RAM 170m HD Scaia MM300 EE All Hard Disk models also include the
above software & Scala MM300 pre-loaded, the Official Amiga Hard Disk manual & HD Install disc.
68040 25MZ 18m RAM
1. 3gb HD Scala MM300 250w PSU 68040 40mz 34m RAMWTy?
1. 3GB HD Scala MM300 2S0w PSU LowCcst 14" Monitor 1 5Khz Only TV
Display Remote Control Amiga Cable Supplied PROnSSOTAL 14"
MOWTOR MuitiSync IS - 31 .BKhzT FtfOffft FhEE DISPLAY Amiga
Cable Suppued I OPTIONS Repairs Hard Disks 1 H kcmiA k M vw
Complifi Expansion Kii Solution for fho Amiga A1200 Yes, at
long last, a profession 3 WAY TO INSTALL A HIGH CAPACITY YEAR
| HARD D SK WITHOUT REMOVING PARTS FROM YOUR MACHINE OR
BENDING YOUR KEYBOARD AROUND the drive. Our packs come with
EVERYTHING you NEED TO INSTALL THE DRIVE fN’TD AN A1200,
CABLES I OR POWER AND DATA, INSTRUCTIONS 6 7 Ostf FULL OF HOT
SOFTWARE SUCH AS Directory Opus 4.12 (worth £50). MUI3. MCP.
Galaga AGA, Virus Checker, Moos, ReOrg, Abagojp and MUCH MORE.
An scfware can be 9STAHED WITH OUR CUSTOM CUCK V GO SYSTEM.
ALL DRIVE5 ARE PRE-INSTALLED WITH THE SYSTEM SOFTWARE 6 ABOVE
DiSKS - UNLIKE OTHERS WE PROVIDE THE by (5malt fed Technicians
All Am iGA Computers Covered Prices from as little as £29.99
Many repairs by Wizard require MO Parts Prices include Insured
Courier Couecmn 6 Delivery; Labour, Full Diagnostics, Service,
Soak Test ti VAT.
' *23* 'OPUS 4.12] i £50 41200 £xpansm Cards Speed Increase op ip to 27 times ? 68030 EC, 68040 or 68060 Processor RUNNING AT 33,40 OR 50MHz ? MMU IN ALL PROCESSORS (EXCEPT 6803QEC TYPE) F‘G4Q fits Standard A1200 - no problem 6 s suppueo with a Heatsink & Fan ? Up to 32mb Of RAM CAN BE ADDED ? K'CKSTART REMAPPING (EXCEPT 68030EC VERSION) ? OPTIONAL SCSI-II nteRface ? Can accommodate a 72-pin SIMM ? 68040 60 have bucmn FPU ? Battery Backed Clock Calender ? PCMCIA tOKPAiiSiE so you can Stiii use P3COLOS SUCH as OyerOrsve HO cr CD Zappc CD-ROM ca Squrrel ? Zero Wajte State Design.
SCSI-tl Interface for m Ma£nuh 68030 68030EC 68040 h 68060 Cards - Supplied wm Software - i79.w Omb 4mb 8 mb I6mb 32 mb '030 33 & FPU £89.99 £!09.99 E129.99 el59« £209.99 '030 40 (68030EC Chp) £89*9 £1099* £129.9* '030 40 & FPU £99* £119* d39* (68030EC Chp) '030 50 £119.99 d39* £159* '040 25 & FPU e179* e199* e219* '040 40 & FPU e229* £249*9 e269* '060 50 & FPU e349* e369* £389* PRICES INCLUDE COLLECTION 1 DELIVERY Fast Turnaround i All Technicians are Fully Trained ti Qualifsed ? Upgrades bough at same time fitted FREE!
* 90 days Warranty on all Repairs ALL FOR JUST £ 29* + PARTS
PARTS W-: HAVE A LARGE RANGE O' PARTS FOR ALL AMIGA'S - DRY'S,
Keyboards. Mouse Ports, Chips and more. Please call for PriC:NG
details.
159.
1. 3ge
2. 5gb * DISKS JUST IN CASE!
Warn us to nr mn Ham Dun ion tn? CALL FOB MOBE DETAILS.
£159* d69* £209* £219* 560i 3 BUTTON MICE & MATS for atl AmijAs A At*ri Sti Award winning 560dpi Resolution ? 90% rating in CU Amiga ? Micro Switched Buttons ? Amiga Atari ST SwiTCHABLE ? All 3 BUTTONS CAN BE USED WITH MANY BEIGE or BUCK fl2.99 MAT £2.99 oi! £1 Pomr3ox Pcwer-Up your A«iga WITH THIS 250a Enhanced Amga PSU FOR LITTLE MORE THAN THE PRICE OF A NORMAL 25-30w Amiga PSU!
Designed forA500 600 6 1200 (CD32 also available). Encased in Steel Subsystem, All Cables Supplied, Whisper Quiet Fan. Illuminated On Off swtch, Monitor outlet on back of PSU, Only Qlwjty Nei PSU's used, 3,5” 6 5.25“ power cables AVAILABLE TO POWER EXTERNAL CD-ROM ¦ v Hard Disks etc, POWERSTRIP £ Power 4 normal plugged devices (monitor, printer, SPEAKERS ETC) DIRECT FROM THE BACK OF PqwERBOX, TURN ALL PRODUCTS ON Off WIN JUST ONE SWITCH, DPI £189* £239* e249* e299* £299** £349* £419* £469* 250* AmifA Pomr Supply Speed Increase of 2.3 times - 2.88m ps ? Available with 0,4 or 8mb of 3 2-bit RAM
installed ? Uses a Standard 72-pin Simm ? Optional PLCC Type FPU (floating point unit) ? Battery Backed Clock Calender ? Finger CutOut to help Installation •* Trapdoor Fitting - doesn't void warranty ? 0-4mb - PCMCIA COMPATIBLE (FOR USE WITH OVERDRIVE, squirrel etc.) ? Zero Wajte State Design.
FREE third BUTTON DRIVER DISK 19 WITH A MOUSE O DIRECTORY pus5 THE ULTIMATE WORKBENCH REPLACEMENT & FILE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Combines the Easy to use Workbench Environment and the POWER Of Opus in one * Replace and Enhance Workbench ? QpjsFTP to open an FTP site as a File Uster ? Internal Multitasking so TurboPriht S Pndts Stbiiamal Sffhrtrt CALL ABOUT UPGRADES 8mb e79* e94* If you have a PRINTER - YOU MUST GET TurboPrint. Il RADICALLY ENHANCES THE PRINTOUTS YCU NORMALLY GET BY REPLACING I he Amiga Printer System with the Faster and Visibly Better TurboPrint System.
Options include Poster Printing, Colour Correction, Dithering, Colour Balancing, On-Screen Preview and Much More... Most printers are SUPPORTED - CALL TO CHECK. VERSION 5 INCLUDES "GRAPHIC Publisher" to load multiple pictures, individual colour CORRECTION, rotate, TWI5T AND MORE. ENHANCED IrueMaTCH COLOUR CORRECTION, NEW DRIVERS FOR HP, CANON, Epson Stylus and Citizen models. Amiga Format RAM8 c39„ e59.„ RAM8 54.. e74.» & 33MHz FPU LOWEST EVER PRICES!
VERSION 5.6 NOW SHIPPING YOU CAN PERFORM MULTIPLE FILE operations SIMULTANEOUSLY (Workbench can't!) ? File-Type Specific Pulldown Menus ? Hotkeys ? Sorting ? Extensive Drag V Drop THROUGHOUT ? ADVANCED AREXX nt Viewer ? MUJ & NewIqns EASYUDGIRS 2 - The ONLY RJU ACCOUNTS WML tiHO, FcfiWT GOIC
• Call asout Trm 0*f£f - Ha» Dsk & 2«e RAM • £119.99 ImageFX 2,6
¦ The MOST COM “LITE NaG£ PaOCESSNC pAOAK THERE S FC* THE Amca
AMIGA Fewmat Gac - CU A wn - 2wa L hUro Dry. FL XffLC - £179.99
A500 512k RAM Expansion £|4.w A500pluS l mb RAM Expansion £I9.w
A600 1 RAM Expansion £19.99 ALL win a FREE Opus 4 «bih ows £50
50 2S D0 Dsns & Couxjk IxflfLS £14.99 100 25 DD Dsxs 4 Colojh
Labels £24.99 4MB 72-pin SIMM £20 8MB 72-pin SIMM £40 16mb
72-pbh SIMM £70 32hb 72-fW SIMM £120 ALL SWHSJS! NEW wo have a
IyearWarhwiy BSB Books & Vidm In$ ©!r Guide-A1200 Ins*hr Guide -
A1200 Next Steps Insider Guide - Assembler Insider Guide -
Disks 6 Dims Insider Guide - Workbench 3 A to Z Total! Amiga -
Workbench 3 Total! Amiga - AmigaDOS Total! Amiga - Afexx NEW
Total! Amiga - Assembler Ma5tebng Am ga Scripts Master ng Ayga
Benners Master.ng Amiga Printers Mastering AkigaDOS 3 -
Reference Mastering Programming Secrets CP f AX - 5t* Faxes to
mc from reus Amgil Evin Fail D«crir fpoh rOLfi Af9UCATWW. Al *
FofWI GdU) - AhjG.
COHfwme 9 10 • Fax Compatbl£ Modem Requbid £44.99 £14.95 £14,95 £14.95 £14,95 £14,95 £19.99 £21,99 £21.99 £2499 £19.95 £19.95 £19.95 £21.95 £21.95 AmigaDOSPack £34.99 Total! Amiga - Am gaDOS & Mastering AmigaDOS 3
- Reference Usually £43.94 - 5AVE NEARLY £9 A1200 Begnner Pack
£39.95 1 eooxi (l?setR A1200 8 Next Steps), a 60 Mwte Voco, 4
06AS OF PO TO CO WTH The BOOO VIDEOS A1200 Workbench 3 Booster
Pack £39.95 2 woks (Dtsks fi Dfiftts 4 Worxbehch 3 A to Z). A
90 MMJTE ViKO. 1 DOC & RtFUSHtt C*M) "BUY 2 OR MORE BSB
PRODUCTS * *
• •AND GIT 10% OFF! ** support ? Picture, Sound & Fc Support ?
Sort file Lists & display Versions and FileTypes ? CyberGraphic
Supported sanruRN Cittrnal 1Mb Floppy prim fir All ComtifeE *TH
ALL Axw ? Hx H Quality SONY Dayr * RoftiST Metal. CASE
* AmhCugc as Stanqaro t eYDsa&i Switch ? Low Pcwa COHStmiCN ? Thu
Pcfii-'CP Extra 49, Workbench 2+ (s Hard Disk Required Dm
PcwffCcpt H«WV£ 5o;TWWJ Systeh & 3 Games £4999 PC TASK 4
AdvAnetd 4-86 PC Soft mat* Emulator CALI ABOUT UPGRADES 33Mhi
FPU HIT PLCC Type FPU 5 Crystal - mu fit HOST CATOS - CALL TO
CONflfM - £29.99 £3999 Featuring Advanced 486 software
Emulation. Dynamic Compilation for FASTER EMULATION, UP TO 16MB
ACCESSIBLE UNDER MS-D05, MDA, CGA, EGA. VGA 6 SVGA supported,
up to 256 colours on an AGA machine, CyberGpaphc support.
Multiple hard disk FILES OR PARTITIONS 5uPP0RTE0, CD-ROM AND
High Density drives supported, Run MS-DOS applications in a
window on Workbench! Run Windows 3,1 in Enhanced Mode! Many
times quicker than version 3.1, REQUtiES KlCXSTAFT 2.0 Of ABOVE
VERSION 4.2 NOW SHIPPING ORDER HOTLINE 0181-303-1800 n
0181-303-1861 WE ARE OPEN 9AM AND 5.30PM, MONDAY TO SATURDAY,
TO PAY BY CREDIT CARD. TO PAY BY CHEQUE OR POSTAL ORDER PLEASE
SEND YOUR ORDER TO - WIZARD DEVELOPMENTS, PO BOX 490, DARTTORD,
KENT, DAI 2UH 69„ '6CME0NI rtELPWe.'
Wurtii £50 Having used an Amiga for the last seven years or so, Neil Mohr has picked up a little knowledge about them. Before he disappears into the editorial wilderness, he would like to bestow this knowledge to you, our beloved readers, oh yes he would, so shut up and bloody listen.
1. Wait for ALL disk activity to STOP This must have killed more
files, disk and hard drives than anything else. Before you
pull out a floppy disk or reset your machine, or just go on to
use another program, wait for your last program to finish
writing to the disk. The classic is pulling out a floppy disk
before a program has finished writing to it and usually
results in lots of read errors and a reformat of the disk, so
no big problem.
The big problems start when you interrupt writing to you hard drive, either by resetting it (naughty) or a program happens to crash while another is writing to drive (annoying). This will general result in the drive becoming invalidated, and more often than not the file system cannot fix the fault itself.
The only way to fix this is to resort to a third party program such as DiskSalv or AmiBack. These will scan your hard drive and fix or remove any problems they come across.
2. Have an emergency recover disk Related somewhat to tip one. If
you have a catastrophic hard drive problem that destroys your
boot partition you are going to need an escape route allowing
you to get your drive back up and running as easily as
possible.
The simplest way to create this type of disk is to make a copy of your original Workbench disk. To do this insert your Workbench disk in internal floppy drive, select the disk icon and from the Icon menu select the copy item. You of course need a blank floppy before you do this. The only program you really need is your file recovery program, either DiskSalv or AmiBack. Both are around 200k, so before they can fit, a few files need to be removed from the copy of your Workbench disk you have just made.
Right, we're going delving around the Workbench files. Double click the disk icon, select the window that has just opened and from the Window menu choose show all files. Next delete the Utilities drawer, don't need any of that stuff.
Open the System drawer, select and delete; FixFonts, Format, NoFastMem, RexxMast and DiskCopy as none of those are really needed. Now go into the Libs drawer and delete, rexxsyslibJibrary, rexxsupport.fi bra ry and amigaguide.library. Finally, from the C drawer you can get rid of Ed and Edit, you should now have more than enough room for either DiskSalv or AmiBack.
If you want more room you can delete the following quite safely; everything found in the L drawer; amigaguide.datatype in the Classes Datatype drawer and the printer.device from the Devs drawer. The whole idea is that if the worse should happen you always have something to fall back on, so keep the disk in a safe place - but not so safe you forget where it is.
This month's ACAS has been I unexpectedly taken over by the surprisingly sober Neil Mohr llccsle iPrefs ¦arwd don Q7-0ci-96 15 03 19
- rved Sun li-ftay-9? 16 S3 85
- :v=c ten Sa-DrC-36 17:06; Si
- rvsd iifi CcHUjg-S? 1? IS
- rwd ter. *3 S3 4$
- rv*d Sir Is 31 27
- rved 5** 12 u l?
- rved Sir 83-Jt*»-97 il 2i 0?
- rwd Sir LL-*ay-9? 14 23 59
- rwd Sun £fe-Afr-9? 12:11 33
1. 19 7 rvd Sun 8Mpr-9? 11:31:27
1. 19 7 rw-d Sun BS-Apr-9? 11:31:38 1,853 n*-d Sw e&-Apr-97
11:38:13 1,863 rv-d Srn 8Mpr-9? 11:38:17 1,197 rv-d Sui
86-Acr-9? 11:31:82 AmiBack has saved the Amiga Computing hard
drive many many times over the years
4. Get to know your Amiga Again, this is a tip that holds true
for any type of machine. Try and learn a little about your
Amiga, you do not have to know everything, but by reading
problem pages you will start to recognise symptoms for common
problems that arise. Things like assigns, wrong library files,
badly configured DOSDrivers are common problems that are
easily fixed if you have the basic knowledge and skills. So if
you come across the problem, you can diagnose and fix it
yourself.
3. Constantly save your work No matter which type of computer you
use this tip will always hold true. I do not trust computers,
there are so many reason why they can just stop working and
take all the work you have done that day with it So every time
you stop to think press that right Amiga and S key, 1 just did
then. If the program supports autosave then use it, but even
so save regularly yourself. It is a good habit to get your
self into, sometimes I find myself saving work after the end
of every sentence.
Amiga Computing
5. People without hard drives For anyone that bought their Amiga
(and is still using it) without one, a good tip is to go out
and buy a hard drive right now. You have no idea what a hard
time you are putting yourself through. If you own an A1200 I'm
sure you could pick up a second hand 40 or 80Mb IDE drive for
next to nothing from a PC shop. For modern Pcs, drives of that
size are useless but Amiga users can still get away with such
small drives. Personally I would still recommend going for at
least 500Mb, but then my Workbench is 100Mb.
6. Separate Workbench partition One way to save yourself a lot of
grief is to make sure you have all your important Workbench
files stored on a separate partition, then have all your
program and data files stored on another partition. This
reduces the chance that you could destroy your boot Workbench
partition, so making it impossible to boot your machine, as
you are more or less exclusively using your work partition.
Here at Amiga Computing towers, we have a separate 120Mb Workbench drive and a 1.2Gb Work drive and I cannot remember once losing the internal drive to validation errors - the external drive is another story, at one point it was going down several times a day.
Formed is backing up your program and data files. There are a few ways to go about it Either back your entire drive up, this takes ages and is not really necessary. Secondly, you can have a single drawer in which you store all your data files and simply back this up. This is very quick and as long as you store away all your original program disks if you do lose your drive you can get back your all the important files.
The final way is to rely on the Amiga's archive bit, every file as an archive attribute bit attached to it A backup utility will set it and if at any time after your last back up the file changes the bit is unset and next time you do a backup this is noted and the new version is backed up again. Personally, I go for the second option.
7. Upgrade your machine rtofl is f Sur. U4tfl 9716 5 fton lrt
- ?? I'M Ncc? FJ? I Sw it ; vr. : Sir. Stands Li:
- l* 5w t: i It is the one thing I have never regretted doing.
Through all the years, whenever I added to my Amiga, the pay
back was always instant and obvious. With my A500, extra memory
allowed me to do more, and an external hard drive let me do it
more quickly.
On my A1200 more memory made the machine twice as fast and allowed me to use much larger documents and graphics A monitor allowed me access to 1:1 ratio screen modes and a larger work area. The Surf Squirrel greatly improved Internet access and the access it gave to external SCSI devices such as Zip and CD drives made my life much easier. Finally, with a fast accelerator, a half gigabyte internal drive and access to virtual memory 1 am never left wanting with the A1200.
A Backup is a wonderful backup program
8. Get these programs As there has been no development of the
operating system since the A4000 came out back in 1992, the
Amiga still lacks some fundamental necessities and more
general points that would make it a polished product. To get
around these limitations I suggest you get the following
programs (all these have been on past Amiga Computing disks,
but if you have missed some here is the list).
They are all PD so will not cost you an arm and a leg.
MCP or MultiCX - Either of these will do, personally I go for MCP but many still prefer the simpler and smaller MultiCX that also does an admiral job of fixing all those little holes in Workbench and Ami- gaDOS MagicMenu - simply makes those dull pull down menus a much more pleasant experience ToolManager - Whether you use version one, two or three this is the best way to add menus, Applcons and even docks to Workbench WBStartup+ - Adds extra control to your WB5tartl)p drawer ClassAction - A multifile recognition program that allows you to handle all your different file types through a
single program icon Swazlnfo - Replaces the rubbish Workbench icon information window with a much better one PowerSnap - Written by Nico Francois, PowerSnap gives as close to global cut and paste as the Amiga is going to have KingCON - Replaces the old Amiga Shell with a far superior version with menus and a scrollable buffer
9. Backup your files One thing that is mentioned more than any
other but rarely per-
10. Get on the Internet Magazines like Amiga Computing are all
very well and good, they do provide good expert information
of the latest Amiga products as well as tutorials, tips and
news, but anything that appears in print is generally at
least a couple of weeks old before you get your hands on it,
simply due to the printing process.
If you want to get the latest Amiga news, information and programs you need to be on-line. Internet services such as IRC allow news to be passed on almost instantly, and superb Web sites such as the Web directory and Amiga Flame give a central hub for the collection of Amiga related news and developments.
The Internet also offers the best way to get hold of the latest PD and shareware programs from Aminet and, with just about every company now on-line, it is easier than ever to get product support via e-mail and downloadable program updates from their related sites.
Amiga Computing For the man in Shetland who was worried about paying 'through the nose'for what was advertised as a service 'without the excess’.... Zetnet Services explain why some providers can be a false economy.
© No set-up fee S 01595 696667 H 01595 696548 SI info@zetnet.net http: www.zetnet.co.uk ecoec Internet service Contact the world CD UK focal call access (D No on-line charges © 5Mb Web Space - Free (D Fast modem access (Standard service supports 33.6kbps) (D Free technical support © Free software £90.00 annual subscription or £8.50 per month (Inc vat) Advert created using Wright U [ U I U H http J wwvf.wrtghttc.C(i.uk Windows 95 Utilities If you use Windows ‘95 then you need “Windows 95 I GREATGRAPHICS Grab it. Draw it.
Customise it, watch it _ everything you A superb grab-bag of accessories for Win 95 Of windows orer add-ons for maintenance m CO piayers w etnet FTP to emad virtual desktops GRAPHICS SptClAL sssbSs No dlskl fegwn Witt aadUoeh*11 , sa»«« fopof , 9 yyidfWl- See V°ur newsagent now!
Ulfl rt*yirtnl D*1 * and in the mag » Ortfft I ssss:s*-- Whether you use your PC for work, for leisure or as a hobby, Windows 95 Utilities is packed with everything you could possibly need. Each issue features the very best programs for tuning Windows for speed and adding functionality. The programs are categorised and sorted for ease of access and use into Disk, Graphics, Internet, Music, Miscellaneous and Hints and Tips sections.
• Configure Windows 95 to run faster and better
• Add functionality that Microsoft left out
• Upgrade old software to the latest versions
• Everything you need on each Coverdisk
• Each issue is packed with help, hints and tips NO Dos, NO Win
3.1, NO games - just cool tools for Windows 95!
Issue 7 on sale NOW - Issue No 8 on sale 11th Sept Qome in, number nine, your time is up. Since this is the last | ever Public Sector, in addition to a handful of the latest and greatest releases, I've decided to share with you not only a selection of the most indispensable PD and HAREWARE shareware utilities ever, but also a collection of my thoughts on the future of our beloved machine. A fond farewell to all, and, as Dave Allen used to say, may your God go with you And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you made. Dave Cusick takes his final stroll down Shareware Street, and
sits thoughtfully contemplating life after AC on a memorial bench in PeeDee Park Although it owes more than a little to the classic platformer, James Pond II: Robocod, Starboy is probably the best game of its kind to appear on the Amiga for several years, even if full commercial releases are taken into account. Available as a full licence- ware release but with a PD demonstration version also obtainable for just 80p plus postage, Starboy is a colourful, entertaining and absorbing platform romp. I've only seen the 11 level demo, but it's enough to convince me that purchasing the full game
would be a worthwhile investment.
The appealing main sprite has an array of moves at his disposal. As well Dynabiaaten This is how all computer games should be made as leaping from one platform to another to progress through the levels, Starboy can throw stars at the baddies that block his way, press switches to lock or unlock doors and even swing from ropes so as to get across chasms.
In an effort to inject added longevity into what might be considered a fairly pass6 genre, in addition to the standard platform-based levels there are a smattering of graphically pleasing, horizontally scrolling, blasting stages too.
With glorious parallaxing visuals, decent sound effects and a bouncy title tune, the presentation of Starboy is impossible to fault It's also chock- full of small puzzles, helping add a Programmed by: Fire Fly Productions Available from: Saddletramps PD Disk No: G77 TAR BOY Amiga Computing Qut of Spice Share They've taken on the establishmint, and doubtless shocked many old Sage pensioners. They wear revealing cloves in which more sweet and innocent girls would feel a mite chilli. In the short thyme that they've been around, they've already broken a host of chart records and changed the chives
of many pre-pubes- cent girls. They seem to be- cumin more popular by the day. This autumn you may find that a lads' Friday night out no longer consists of a coriander few beers; instead 'mm Produced by: Kinky Available from: SaddleTramps PD Disk No: D38 A&B they will be nipping down the local cinnamon to see Spice Girls: The Movie.
In a few years, the Spice Girls will have been and tarra-gon, and much like this column they'll be nothing more than a dim memory in the minds of the masses... then we can all be chervil. In fact, I do confess that 1 mar- jor-am reviewing these disks parsley because there was orega-no way I could miss the opportunity to pack as many poor spice puns as I could think of into one of my final Public Sector reviews. I just couldn't keep the temptation at bay. I do apologise; I shall end your saffron now, dear reader.
Out Of Spice is an AGA-only demo featuring a fairly tuneful sample of the famous five, a few slightly grainy scanned pictures of selected Spices, and the usual smattering of moderately impressive visual effects. It does not last for a particularly long time but, unlike the vast majority of demos, you might actually want to dig it out of your diskbox more than once to show people. Or then again, you might not.
I realise it's a little early to be thinking about the season of good will, but AC won't be around when December comes and, as Lord Baden-Powell was keen to emphasise to young boys everywhere, it pays to be prepared.
Qhristmas Card Maker Produced by: Classic Amiga Software Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: PA118 Christmas Card Maker is an example of an extremely good idea which should inspire creative types to produce some genuinely impressive results. It is a collection of small Christmassy images and verses which can be pasted onto a supplied master page using any decent paint package. The image can then be printed out to make an extremely cheap but nevertheless reasonably good-looking Christmas card.
Amiga Computing There are five verses, several "Merry Christmas" messages and a dozen or so snowy scenes, which can be combined very easily in Dpaint, Personal Paint or any one of a wealth of other packages.
A potential problem with the bitmapped image-based approach Christmas Card Maker takes is that such graphics can, unless created at an extremely high resolution, tend to look jagged or blocky when output. Although the snowy scenes provided are ail only around 320x256 pixels and have to be output at a size of around 115x70mm, the finished cards don't actually look too bad. The results obviously aren't going to be on a par with commercially available cards, but they look a whole lot better than Blue Peter-esque handmade efforts.
As I have already suggested though, the most important quality of Christmas Card Maker may actually be that it will inspire many Amiga users to have a go at designing their own cards - even if they do so using graphics from elsewhere, or a DTP program as an alternative to an art package so as to obtain higher quality text output As such, this represents another in a long line of simple but sensible disks compiled by Classic Amiga Software, and although some of the images and verses supplied are a little disappointing, there should be enough here to really get your creative juices
flowing.
Programmed by: NC Gamez Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: G528 This is a cutesy platformer in the mould of the massively successful Mario series available for the Nintendo consoles.
Fayoh is still under development and so this disk only contains a 5-level demonstration version of the game.
Share The titular hero Fayoh is in actual fact a green fruit gum, who has lost his heart to a "pink 'n'cute" female fruit gum. Unfortunately, he's lost her too, and so he must traverse a colourful platform landscape to find her once more.
The graphics are extremely bright and attractive. In addition to the pleasant gradiated backdrop there is even a simple parallax scrolling effect, making the game especially pleasing visually.
The music is suitably cute and inoffensive, although I doubt that you will find yourself whistling it in the shower.
I feel that I ought to be extremely fond of Fayoh, but I have a couple of reservations about wholeheartedly recommending it. Firstly, perhaps owing to the fact that Fayoh was written in Blitz Basic rather than in C or Assembly language, on a standard A1200 the action is a tad pedestrian, although on faster machines things become slightly more frantic. Secondly, the game crashed a couple of times during testing (although admittedly this only seemed to happen when the program was started from the Workbench, and not when I booted from the Fayoh disk).
Still, Fayoh has not yet been completed, so perhaps the bugs will have been ironed out of the finished version. The full game is set to include 28 levels and various different graphical styles, and will be available to those contributing a shareware fee of between £6 and £10.
Programmed by: David L Papworth Available from: Classic Amiga Software Disk No: G527 ? He DLP Collection
- . • ...... This is a collection of David Papworth's gaming
creations of the last few years.
Mad Bomberman is a fairly simplistic game but will nevertheless provide a few minutes of entertainment At the top of the screen the eponymous bomberman peers over a wall and drops a series of bombs which you must collect in a blue container. If any bombs get past you, you lose a life. If you manage to collect them all, then he drops another series of bombs, except this time they'll fall faster and there will be more of them. It is not the most intellectually demanding of games, but I've certainly seen worse.
Obliteration is a Pang clone. You take control of a Turrican-like sprite packing a directable firearm, and you must destroy several asteroids bouncing around the screen. Larger asteroids split into smaller ones when hit so if you are not careful you can end up with a large number of rocks hurtling around the screen. Unsurprisingly, if your warrior is hit by an asteroid then he will lose a life.
Atom Smasher is a cracking maze game which reminds me of an old Acorn Electron game called Pengi. You (and a friend, if you've got one) take control of a little robot chappy wandering around screen after screen populated by meanies which can only be destroyed by pushing blocks into them. With beautifully smooth graphics and an impressive turn of speed, this is hugely enjoyable, frantic fun, especially when played in the cooperative two-player mode.
Super Obliteration (originally reviewed in issue 81) is, unsurprisingly, an enhanced version of David's earlier effort.
It is not radically different from the original, but the graphics seem a little tidier and there are a host of new levels to try.
In addition to Vector Battle Ground, a reasonable enough tank game, there is also a demonstration version of David's Licenceware classic, Outfall. This is a clone of the Megadrive gem Mean Bean Machine, and it is undoubtedly one of the greatest two player games available for the Amiga.
If you don't already have Atom Smasher, Super Obliteration or Outfall, this disk represents an essential purchase.
Catering for a wide variety of gaming styles, it comes highly recommended.
Amiga Computing Every month for around a decade. Public Sector has tried to bring you the very best in PD and Shareware, Over the 39 issues in which I've been in charge of the column, there has been a constant stream of submissions both from Public Domain libraries and from individuals, and I'd like to thank you all for your support.
As Neil joked to me the other week, there have been times in recent months when it has seemed like this column has contained the only new software arriving in the AC office.
Writing the last ever Public Sector has been quite a sad experience; 1 would like to think that this column, into which I've poured more of myself than anything else I've written for a magazine, has provided some amusement over the years as well as helpful information and opinions.
Although we all hoped this day would never come, for a while now it has seemed something of an inevitability. The good ship Amiga Computing has sailed its final voyage; the crew must toddle off to pastures new and those who enjoyed the precious bounty it bore must now find an alternative purveyor of provisions. So what will you do now, dear reader? Will you abandon the Amiga altogether, convinced that the end of AC marks the final nail in a coffin within which our beloved machine has been languishing for some time? I would hope not; and if you are to follow the flock and purchase a PC, then
I would at least suggest that you keep hold of your Amiga... just in case. At least then you'll be able to return if the possible Power Amiga revolution materialises, and even if it doesn't, you'll find the PC is not a beast which is easily Come Together That said, I strongly suspect that, if you've stuck with the Amiga this long, you will be willing to carry on the fight after our departure. It could be that you will turn to one of AC's competitors... whilst this is not the first Amiga magazine to wave a fond farewell, it isn't the last either, and there are others still flying the flag.
(One of them is now home to erstwhile AC editor Ben Vost, and indeed yours truly will continue to churn out PD and Internet pages for that publication for as long as he can).
On the other hand, you might decide to follow a large number of dedicated Amigans onto the Internet. There are so many excellent Amiga resources on the Net now that you should always be able to keep up to date with the latest developments in the software and hardware markets (and my Public Sector webpages at http: www.dcus.demon.co.uk will remain in place for the forseeable future). With any luck, at least some of these sites will be championing the Amiga long after this humble column has become but a distant memory in the minds of computer users everywhere.
L -jSJ 4 I Want You (She's So Heavy) I know it's a tad corny, but I couldn't resist the temptation to award some sort of Public Sector awards to the best pieces of software to have been reviewed in these pages. In issue 114 I ran through the best in PD and shareware games, so here, for your deliberation, cogitation and digestion, are a handful of "serious" programs no Amiga owner should be without If you don't already have them, ring up your favourite PD library and order them now.
HAREWARE Magic User Interface I've currently got v3.8 installed, although by the time you read this that could easily be out of date. This is without doubt one of the greatest pieces of software ever written for the Amiga. As means of providing programmers with extremely easy-to-pro- duce interface routines and providing users with a highly configurable, not to mention extremely attractive, front-end, Mill is simply in a league of its own. Some will say that ClassAct uses less memory, or BGUI is more compact. To those people I say that several thousand Amiga users and literally hundreds of
Amiga programmers simply can't be wrong. Get hold of a copy, register with SASG, and enjoy.
ImageStudio 2 Everyone needs an image processor, and they don't come a lot better than ImageStudio 2. Programmed by Graham and Andy Dean, whose latest masterpiece DrawStudio is available commercially through LH Publishing, this is the definitive shareware graphics package. It can read and write every image format you'll ever need to deal with, and it boasts a stunning arsenal of effects too.
Master Control Program The commodity that does everything, MCP is an absolute essential for any self- respecting Workbench user. It demands a fair bit of memory, a fact which has led some to use MuitiCX instead; but that is an inferior program in terms of features and, let's face it, most Amiga owners these days own powerful enough machines to run MCP on.
Browser II v3.09 If you can't afford Dopus Magellan then, at least until Workbench 4, WorkbenchNG or a similar replacement Workbench appears, this is probably the single most dramatic change you could make to your daily file-handling. It won't be to everyone's taste, but it is user- friendly, highly configurable and has the potential to radically increase your productivity.
NewIcons 3 Not everyone fancies Magic Workbench, particularly if they have a fancy graphics card which is capable of running Workbench in a plethora of colours. NewIcons 3 offers a rather more bright colourseheme, and although icons will look completely stupid on non-patched systems (they'll appear as a tiny blob), on suitably configured systems they look extremely attractive. They're a tad slow on lesser Amigas however.
NewIcons 3 won't be for everyone; but it's one of those programs that if you don't hate, you'll love.
Toolmanager 2 There's a newer version, but if anything the new user interface overcomplicates what was already an immensely powerful, if slightly illogically designed, user interface enhancement. You can add items to the Workbench Tools menu and you can configure icon docks, with the end result being a far more sophisticated Workbench in which all the most powerful applications are available within a couple of clicks.
Amiga Computing 42 OCTOBER 1997 UK Customers call 01709 888127 FREE FREE GAMES CHEATS 1.4 EMULATOR ON ALL ORDERS FREE FREE LIBRARY DISK POST & PACK ON ALL ORDERS Sagittarius Software (AC) 1706 Canton Road Akron, OH 44312 USA Amos Compiler Amiga 5D Ucenceware Vulcan Software httpy www.ware5d.demon.co.uk http: sagsoft.ald.net Special Re-Ink For Panasonic 1080 81.
1123 24. 2123 80, 2135.
Star LC200 9 Pin, Epson LQ100 150, Oki 182 to 390 range. Black bottle will re-ink 100 + ribbons £9,95 T-Shirt printing ribbons Citizen Swift ABC !2QD 5 black reloads.. £9.99 Star LC10 20 IOO 5 black reloads ......£4.99 Star LC24 range 5 black reloads ......£9.99 Seikosha 1900 24(XVSL95 5 black reloads £9.99 Epson FX80 to LQ800 range 5 black refcads£l 1.99 Star LC24-30 LC24G 5 black reloads .-...£14.99 T-shirt printing is simple, just print onto normal paper & iron on. One ribbon gives lots of prints. We can also supply ribbons in many colours T-shirt and normal ink.
Mediasoft .. .20 Moore Healey Marketing .28 Pathfinder Pd .28 S & S Computers ..28 Saddletramp PD ....43 Special Reserve ....28 Underground PD .43 White Knights .....23 Wizard Developments .33 Zetnet ....37 DISKS COST £1.50 EACH, NO MINIMUM ORDER, ALL VIRUS FREE AND USER FRIENDLY All Games are on 1 disk and run on allAmigas unless otherwise stated.
PICK AN EXTRA DISK FOR FREE WITH EVERY EIGHT DISKS YOU PURCHASE UNDERGROUND RD, 54 CARMANIA CLOSE, SH0EBURYNESS, ESSEX SS3 9YZ. Tel: 01702 295887 Name: ... Amiga Model: ..... Address Postcode: Our refills use only top quality inks. You buy direct from us hence our superb qua! Iiy at sensible prices, Black refills for HP Deskjet 500,510,550, 500C, 550C, 560C, 660C, 850C CANON BC-OI. BJIOE EX SX, BC-02, BJ200, BJ130, BJ3Q0, BJ330 EPSON STYLUS 800, 1000. CITIZEN PROJET. OLIVETTI
JP150, 250, 350.
6 refill (3 on high capacity cartridges) kit 120ml pure black. £16.99 CANON’ BJC 210. 600. 4000 Ranges up to 20 refills pure black. £16.99 EPSON STYLUS Colour II IIs 500 120ml pure black. £16.99 TRICOLOUR REFILL KITS: HP Deskjet range 10 refills of Yellow, Magenta & Cyan 180ml £24.99 CANON BJC210, BJC600.4000 4100 10 refills of Yellow. Magenta & Cyan 180ml £24.99 EPSON STYLUS CoIour ll lIs 500 Yellow, Magenta & Cyan 60ml each £24.99 “Print Head Recovery' Fluid" for unblocking nozzles, new larger size, new lower price £6,99 all kits come with full instructions. Other refills available.
Important: Please stale type when ordering FREE Catalogue Disk 1st Computer Centre . 16 Active Software . 31 Care Electronics ...43 Chroma .28 Classic Amiga 28 Computer Systems & Services ....28 Gastelner ....13 Golden Image ...7 Guidhall Leisure ...24 Harwoods .IFC, 3 Hi-Soft IBC, OBC
ICPUG ...28 Prices include VAT & postage. To order send cheques PO payable to: CARE PRODUCTS Dept AMC, IS Holland Gardens, Watford, WD2 6JN or use Visa Masiereard or Education order Tr Fax order line 01923 672102 ¦¦Wi Call your local dealer for details of our superb Amiga range. Games. Utilities and Educational programs starting from just £3.95 56.50. To claim your free catalogue disk just call the UK number shown above and quote AC3 or send two first class postage stamps to 5D Software. Most of the products have PO demo disks, so you can try them out
first.
To Reload a ribbon i* easy, just remove the top, take out the old ribbon and reload it wilh a new one.
Complete One Five ribbon reload reloads Citizen Swift ABC 240 etc. £11-95 £6.99 £29.95 Panasonic KXP2123 2124 2 ISO £9.99 £6.99 £29.95 Panason ic KXP2135 £9.99 £6.99 £29.95 Star LC200 9 pin £9.99 £5,99 £29.95 Star LC24-10 20 200 £9.99 £6.99 £29.95 Star LC24-30 LC240 £8,99 £4.95 £19.99 Seikosha SL95 £14.95 £6.99 £29.95 4 col Citizen Swift ABC 240....£19.99 4 col Panasonic 2123 2135 £19.99 4 colour Star LC20G 24 Pin JE19.99 reloads for above £9.99 4 colour Star LC20G 9 Pin £12.99 4 colour Star LC10 .£10.99 reloads for above £7.99 Black Citizen Swift ABC 120D £9.99 Black
Star LC 10 £9.99 Black Star LC200 9pin £9.99 Black Panasonic KXP1080 81 ...£9.99 Black Panasonic KXP 1123 24 ,..£9.99 5D Software (AC) 1 Lower Mill Close Goldthorpe, Rotherham S63 9BY Amiga 5D & FI Ucenceware Amiga & PC Public Domain Amiga & PC CD-Roms Tel ORDER LINE 01923 894064 QUALITY INK JET & BUBBLE JET REFILLS CARE QUALITY & SERVICE Colour Printer Ribbons & Reloads Black Printer Ribbon Reloads Websites US Customers call 1-800-426-7687 PLATFORM GAMES a 1330 CAPTAIN BONUS a 1233 ROACH MOTEL a IMS 10 CW. GAMES a 15S3 LANCE-O-LOT a 1462 CHARLIE COOL a 1701 ITS HIDEOUS
a 1684 THE BIRDIES a 1878 JUMPMAN DELUXE a 2003 A12 BANANA IS SPACE BLASTERS a 911 SOLO ASSAULT a 906 OBLHERATOR a 498 THE LAST REFUGE a 1434 SPACE BLASTER a 1789 MEGA TYPHOON a 1855 A12 SPEEDBftEAX a 1885 BLASTED a 1904 CREEPY CRAWLIE a 1921 WITNESS a 1935 SPACE ESCAPE a 1942 GALAXY BUI2 ARCADE GAMES a 273 KELLOGS EXPRESS a 1368 ALIENS F.F. a 1338 STRIKE COMMAND a 1500 U.P.D. 24 GAMES a 1880 At2 SLIPSTREAM a 1908 A12 FLY TIGERS a 1944 POSIDEN a 1948 ANTS a 1998 SUN-NOT 1.3 a 2008 A1200 KICK IT
P. O. VERSIONS a 025 HUNTER PLUS a 815 LEMMINGS PACK a 023 RICK
DANGEROUS a 1457T1-FIGHTER a 022 THE GODS a 026 R06OCQP V2 a
1702 S.W.O.S. MOON a 1778 PINBALL FANTASY COMBAT GAMES a 941
FATAL BL0W5 a 938 MARTIAL SPIRIT a 290 FIGHT WARRIORS a 1238
WEAPON MASTER a 1428 CYBERGAMES 3DSK a 1S48 FIGHT A1200 a 1720
A1200 SAMURJ CLASSIC GAMES a 011 ASTEROIDS a 693 MISSILE
COMMAND a 778 OVERLANDER a 692 SPACE INVADERS a 841 COOKIE a
308 DONKEY KONG DRIVING GAMES a 951 FLAMING ENGINES a 1459 THE
ROAD TO HELL a 1417 MANG FENDERS V2 a 1456 A12 KNOCK OUT a
1642 A1200 EX RACING a 1705 A12AER RACERS a 1893 BOS5CAR a 074
FI EDITOR 96 7 SIMULATORS a 332 5EALANCE-SUB a 333 BATTLE CARS
V2 a 926 HELICOPTER a 1273 A12 TRAIN DRYER SPORTS GAMES a 1014
CRAZY GOLF a 630 TEN PIN BOWLING a 1171 2 DSKCRS-ANGLER a 1373
ICE HOCKEY a 1317 A12 GON PISH N a 1465 A12 2 DISK TENNIS a
1251 TOUR TENNIS a 1630 INTER CRICKET a 1700 GOLF 9 HOLES
HINTS & CHEATS a 418 1000 CHEATS a 931 BACKDOOR V3 a 821
PASSWORD MANIA a 813 GAME TAMER V4.5 a 820 MEGA CHEATS a 681
SIERRA SOLUTIONS a 1118 UP TO DATE VI a 1358 GAME SOLUTIONS a
1653 SOLUTIONS V3 a 1651 SOLVES 6 DISK OVER 18 GAMES a 997
2DSK ADVENT VI a 1001 2DSK ADVENT V2 a 101 TERROR UMER VI a
1081 ADULT TETRIS a 1248 STRIP POKER a 1145 A12 NUMBERS VI a
133S ADULT DROID5 a 1533 DRAGONS BALL a 1517 ADULT BOMBER a
16S4 LEGO BREAKOUT a 1768 4 DSKA12 ADVENT 1906 BUND DATE
TETRIS - COLUMNS a 294 KLACK-TRIS COLMS a 107 TWIN-TR15 TETRIS
a 293 DR MARlO COLMS a 1602 SUPER FOUL EGG a 1627 PlLL-MANIA a
1919 VANILLA TETRIS a 1954 A1200 PLUBZ a 2000 A12 WORM-TRJS
PAC-MAN GAMES a 1096 PUC-MAN a 1138 A12 CYBER MAN a 1346 WABE5
PAC MAN a 1648 A12 BOBS LEMON a 230 SUPER PAC MAN a 1931 A12
PLAY PAC a 19S6 JAOUMAN BREAK-OUTS PONG a 003 MEGABALL VI a
459 MEGABALL V2 a 1459 CYBERSPHERE a 559 ME GABALL V3 a 1704
BORIS BALL a 1853 DOUBLE 8ATTIE a 1924 OUTSIDE BREAK
BOULDERDASH GAMES a 1527 ICE MINE PRO a 1595 NEW MINES a 1569
BUG MINES a 1572 UNDERMINES a 1573 GOLD MINES a 1577 EMERALD
HEAD a 1S80 EXPERT MINES a 1S82 DENMARK MINES a 1583 STYX
MINES a 1892 SPACE MINES a 2013 WONDER MINES PUB-CLUB GAMES a
1304 CHECKERS V2 a 222 FRUIT MACHINE a 375 CARDS SOUTAIRE a
1246 AMIGA CRIBBAGE a 1362 PUB DARTS TOUR a 560 WORLD DARTS a
1450 SAT SNOOKER a 1112 AI200X CARDS a 1930 A12 DOMINOES a
1929 A1200 YATZEE BOARD GAMES a 910 NEW MONOPOLY STAT a 631
SCRABBLE a 476 CHESS GAMES a 1433 LIFTS 4 LADDERS ADVENTURE
GAMES a 116 STAR TREK 2 DISK a 297 NEIGHBOURS 2 DISK a 1671
BREED 1996 a 1753 A1200 GLOOM a 1894 TIME RUNNER V2 a 1925
DUNGEONS STRATEGY GAMES a 876 GLOBAL NUKE WAR a 826
IND-ESPIONAGE a 1182 A12 NIGHTMARE a 1170 A12 LORDS 2 D5K a
1431 UFO UNCLOTHED a 1547 SOLO STAR-TREK PUZZLER GAMES a 953
CHANEQUE 2 DISK a B59 10 PUZZLERS a 1550 PUZZLE PETS a 1546
EXPERT BALLS a 1633 THE WOOGUES a 1765 BRAIN BALLS MANAGER
GAMES a 876 SCOTTISH LEAGUE a 321 AIRPORT a 443 5LAM BALL a
817 BLOOD BALL a 1429 ULT1 MANAGER a 1699 PREMIER PIG a 1763
AIR TRAFFIC a 1771 MICRO MART 3 QUIZ GAMES a 1031 TREK TRY 5
DISK a 716 POP MUSIC QUIZ a 309 THE QUIZ MASTER a 462 WHEEL OF
FORTUNE a 1597 QUIZ 555 a 1683 HOLLYWOOD TRIV a 1670 A12 DEATH
ROW LOGIC GAMES a 1037 MARBLES GAME a 1035 ATOMIC GAME a t19
DRAGON'S TITUS a 112 DRAGON'S CAVE a 1477 BOMB MAN1AG a 1476
MAR8EL-LOUS a 1687 TILE MANIA a 1922 LOGIG a 1960 BLOCK BLANKS
AMIGA LEISURE a 205 AMIGA PUNTER a 228 PERM CHECKER a 1210
LOTTO LUNATIC a 1438 A-GENE VS a 1594 LOTTERY SYSTEM a 1682
THE PHYSIO AN a 1932 DYNAMIC SKIES A1200 MEGADEMOS a 1270 DOOM
RAVE a 1165 VENTILATOR a 1414 2 DESK DOVE a 1415 MYSTIC ILEX a
1725 DREAM WITH ME a 1783 FATAL MORGANA a 1939 ATMOS-FEAR a
1934A12 2DSKUARS a 2002 POKE THE EYE!
AMIGA MEGADEMOS a 460 TEKNO RAVE a 1015 2DSKTAZ QUEEN a 1120 2DSK TAZ-QUEEN 2 a 1104 2DSK OXYGENE a 1084 ASCII NOT 1.3 a 1785 TECHNO TRACKS a 1816 BATMAN 2 DISK a 1985 COLOUR aCU A1200 SLIDE SHOWS a 740 4 DISK MANGA a 1271 PIXEL STORMS a 1193 LEMMINGTONS a 1646 MISS MANGA a 1650STARFLEET 3DSK AMIGA SLIDE SHOWS a 704 REVELATIONS a 061 PAT NAGEL'S GIRLS a 936 AVIATION HI5TORY a 1498 NIGEL MANSELLS a 1472 YABA DABA DO ARTWORK PACKAGE a 063 ULTRAPAINT a 349 SPECTRA COLOUR a 748 ILLUSION PAINT a 1460 A-Z PAINT PAD a 1565 CARTOON STUDIO a 1707 PERFECT PAINT a 1760 JNR PICASSO a 1932 DOODLE NOT 1.3
ARTWORK PROGRAMS a 1299 A12 MAGNI-CAD a 071 GRAPH ICS CON KIT a 070 GRAPHIC UTILS a 133 FRAC LAND BUILD a 1026 PICTURE LAB ANIMATIONS a 084 PUGGS IN SPACE a 651FAIRL1GHT 242 a 831 RED DWARF a 475 BAIT MASKING a 347 NEWTEK V3 2 DISK a 187 ANIMATION STUDIO AMIGA VIDEO a 329 VIDEO INSCRIPT a 790 V1DE0TRACKEH SLXSK a 148 S ¦ MOOVIE MUSIC MAKERS a 220 FUNK KEYBOARDS a 431 RAVE KEYBOARDS a 202MEOV3.2 a 729 DRUM MACHINE a 787 SONIC DRUM KJT a 738 OCTAMED V2 a 136 THE ART OF MED a 192 THE COMPOSER a 618 MUSIC DATABASE a 981 AUDIO ENGINEER a 1268 HIPPO PLAYER a 1681 PROTRACKER 3.5 a 1791 OCTATUTOR V5 a
1971 SAMPLE MAKER CLASSIC - POP a 1029 COTTONEYE SONG a 201 PIANO CLASSIC a 234 VIVALDI 2 DISK a 342 AMIGA-DEUS a 213 D1GI CONCERT V2 a 620 BAGPIPE MUSIC a 248 EXPRESSION V2 a 473 RHYTHM’S DANCER a 13S7 2 MEG DACO VI a 1759 GUITAR BLUES a 1757 HEAVY METAL a 1800 TEKNO MAGE 96 a 1968 BEATLE MANIA SAMPLES - MODS a 660 KORG 01W 8 DISK a 647 SOUND FX 3 DISK a 619 DRUMS 2 01SK a 1666 URBAN 6 DISK a 1583 DANCE 5 DISK a 1258 MOVIE 5AMPLES a 1828 NEW WORMS 5FX a 1861 MONTY PYTHON a 1850 ANSWER-PHQNES AMIGA EMULATION a 423 2 DISK SPECTRUM a 889 PC EM 2 DISK a 327 ACTION REPLAY a 955 DOWN TO A500 a 313
UPTO A500PIUS a 414UPTOA1200 a 1977 RELO-KICK 1.41 DISK COPIERS a 727 MULTI TASK Ml) a 158 X.COPY PRO a 357 COPY AND CRACK a 325 LOCKPICKER V2 a 1667 COPY 8 CRACK V2 a 1896 COPY 8 CRACK V3 HARD DRIVES a 775 W B 3 INSTALL a 7BC W B 2 INSTALL a 49C 8 DISK MAGIC W B a 1692 A BACKUP VS a 1674 CD ATARI a 1775 2 DISK MUI 3.6 a 1770 2 D5K ERROR TALK a 1966 GAME INSTALLLV9 a 1967GAME INSTALL V10 PRINTING a 243 AWARD MAKER 4DSK a 065 AMIGA FONT 7 DISK a 100 PRINTER DRIVERS a 048 PRINTING STUDIO a 345 BANNER MAKER a 057 TEXT ENGINE V4 a 394 INVOICE PRINT a 749 FORM PRINTER a 1658 CARD AND LABEL a 1842
PRJNTM ASTER a 2012 FONT EDITOR AMIGA BUSINESS a 832 DATABASES 2 DISK a 092 ACCOUNT MASTER a 470 LITTLE OFFICE a 244 SPREADSHEET a 535 UK S.T.D. CODES a 1464 DIARY 2000 a 1368 AmiBASE V4 a 1758 DAILY LMNG a 1976 NOTE-BOOK COLOUR CLIPART a 637 6 DISK COL BRUSH a 633 7 DISK CUP ART a 901 9 DISK WORLD MAP MONO CLIP ART a 172 15 DISK PORTFOLIO a 558 7 DISK CUP ART AMIGA MODEM a 702 COMMS TUTORIAL a 413 N. COMMS V3 a 079 OPTiCOMMS V2 a 1032 MAX BBS PROG PROGRAMMERS a 288 A-BASIC TUTOR a 306 UNDERSTAND AMOS a 722 TONS OF AMOS a 1067 AGA DATATYPES a 1691 NORTH C a 1754 AMIGA DOS FRAU DO IT YOURSELF a
239 5UDE5HOW MAKER a 808 MAKE A DISK a 242 MENU MAKER a 1154HEDLEY GUIDE A12 a 1903 MAKE A DISK V2 VIRUS CONTROL a 506 A1200 VIRUS a 160 M.V.K. PLUS AMIGA UTILITIES a 1030A12 DIONIC TOOLS a 612 4 DSK TOOL KIT a 1629 UN-ARCHIVER a 1983 CRUNCHERS 60 DISK & SYSTEM a 166 SYSTEM TESTER a 467 FILE UNDELETE a 194 DISK OPTIMISE a 356 ENGINEERS KIT a 245 FIX DISK a 168 HARDWARE MANUAL a 1B81 HARDWARE MODS AMIGA EDUCATION a 756 GEOGRAPHY a 532 MATH5 5 DJSK5 a 644 ENGLISH 4 DISK a 436 LANGUAGES 4 DISK a 270 PLANETS 6 DISK a 304 ENGINES 5 DISK a 1269 DPAINT 4 TUTOR a 937 A1200 600 TUTOR a 1361 2 DISK
INTERNET a 1360 AMIGA GUIDE a 1918 KUNGON TUTOR THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO HOME COMPUTING PC Home offers something for everyone; newcomers and old hands alike, families and individuals, cutting through the clutter of the PC market it provides a clear and informative guide to home computing. We aim to cover as much as possible in as much depth as possible.
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE In every issue you’ll find: Whatever the latest developments be they hardware, software or Web-based we cover them all.
the newest hardware tested to destruction and a round up of the best products around.
Previews and reviews of all the best (and worst) new games, with walkthroughs, hints and tips.
working from home? We review the software designed to make a SoHo business run smoother and more efficiently.
THE WES the Internet is given a comprehesive and unique going over.
all the latest educational software marked out of 10 by our resident expert.
art packages, music generators, reference programs whatever the interest we have something to suit you.
problems? We solve your troubles as well as print the latest tips and tricks to help you get the most from your machine.
PLUS... THE MEGADISK PC Home is the only PC leisure title to carry a quality fully working product on its CD-Rom every month without fail, in the past these have included CorelDraw! 3, Hutchinson's Encyclopedia, Comptons Encyclopedia, Multipedia, Redshift, Bodyworks, Picture Publisher, PC Paintbrush... Available from all good newsagents or to subscribe call: 0151 357 1275 Paul Overaa brings you up-to-date on a sampling package ¦ jfefimoS; iund ¦juA© Pi© While other platforms seem to have almost discarded 8-bit sound sampling (or at least keep very quiet about it), like it or not the 8-bit
world is still the norm for most Amiga users. One company that has been making samplers for almost as long as the Amiga has been in existence is New Dimensions, and early last year it brought out an updated 'Pro' version of its popular TechnoSound Turbo 2 sampler.
One improvement was the move to 12-bit sample processing on many internal routines. Although the main reason for the higher accuracy routines was to allow the software to be used with New Dimension's own 12-bit sampler (which is now no longer available), the extra accuracy did however reduce potential quality loss even when manipulating 8-bit samples, so overall these new enhancements were of benefit to everyone.
I should also mention that not all processing carried out by the software is being performed using 12-bit calculations. You've still got 8-bit direct to hard disk recording, and real time effects like phasing, echo, delay and the special Funtime 'novelty1 effects (e.g. Pinky & Perky, Dalek and so on) are also performed in 8-bit mode because high conversion speeds are needed.
The TurboSound software itself is fairly comprehensive. As well as the main range of digitising, sample editing and manipulation functions, there's a 'ramscan' option for grabbing samples directly from memory and 'edit lisf arrangements for maintaining sets of samples in memory for immediate use. There's also integral sequencer and tracker facilities and a useful Midi module which enables samples to be triggered using a Midi keyboard or external sequencer.
The package has some nice filtering routines Amiga Computing TechnoSound Turbo’s software has undergone various improvements over the years and a facility for editing individual channels. Digital filtering essentially means applying certain mathematical transformations to the digitised waveform
- you can, for example, use a low pass filter effect to remove
unwanted hiss from a sample. Tech- noSound Turbo can apply low
pass, high pass and band pass filtering using either the
Butterworth or Chebyshev filter equations. You can view
frequency response graphs that show predicted amplitude
attenuation and even get a display called a Z-Trans- fer plot
Now all (this unless you are actively involved in the world of
digital signal processing techniques) is likely to sound a
little high powered (the theory behind it certainly is). The
best thing to do is just let your ears be the judge,
remembering that it's far better to concentrate on getting a
good quality sample in the first place than to rely on digital
filtering to improve things. Having said that, there's no
doubt at all that TechnoSound's filter and realtime effects
are good fun to experiment with!
On The Line Despite the fact that nowadays the TechnoSound Turbo Pro 2 software is only ever bundled with 8- brt hardware, this makes an excellent basis for conventional 8-bit sampling. Talking of hardware, one alternative to the TechnoSound offering is of course HiSofTs Aura sound sampler. Make no mistake, this package is good (very good) but not everyone is able to take advantage of this because the Aura hardware requires a PCMCIA slot In short this effectively means that the Aura option is only available to A600 A1200 owners and users of other Amigas must follow different pathways.
It's also worth remembering that anyone with earlier versions of the TechnoSound Turbo sampler can, for a modest fee, still upgrade their software and this is clearly a worthwhile option.
Let's face it despite the 16-bit or nothing 'hype', for many purposes 8-bit sampling is perfectly adequate and samples are inherently smaller in size than their grown up 16-bit relations. Of course when you combine hardware such as is provided with the TechnoSound package with other music software (such as the OctaMED Sound Studio), then the door really opens. Time and time again musicians have shown that combinations like this can enable you to produce tracker modules second to none.
Bottom fine Last month I outlined the use of Arexx's SeekO function and mentioned that it could be used to provide the basis of a HwPr number of sophisticated file access mechanisms. I also mentioned that there were plans to show how the function could be used to parse file structures. However, having thought more about this, I decided that for starters we really ought to deal with conventional random access file handling first.
Paul Overaa makes a start explaining how to create and use random access files Jtundon Access Files Random access files are based on the use of fixed length records containing fields whose position and size within each record is also fixed.
You might, for example, chose to set up a data file consisting of records set up like this... field naies: sizes (bytes) 20 20 10 10 There are two approaches to building such records. Firstly, you could use SeekO to address each field of a given record individually - thus storing each field of the record as a separate operation. The disadvantage here is that many seeking and writing operations may be needed to write each record (if there are many fields).
The alternative approach (and the one usually adopted is to build up the complete record) is to make one SeekO operation, and store the whole record in one go.
Now it's fairly obvious, in the latter case, that data items collected must be padded to the right length in order to make the resulting record size right. Arexx's LeftQ function comes in handy here and if the variable 'surname' for example needs to be brought to a length of 20 characters by padding with blanks, this expression will do the job: surna*e=surnaie| |lef t(surnaie,20,BUNK) BLANK, incidentally, is a pseudo constant set up using the expression BLANK=r 1 in order to make the code easier to read!
InitiallseAain: Procedure arg filenaie, record, record_count if 0pen(iain,filen3»e r¥1) then do do i=1 to record_count call yriteHecordfaain,record,i-1) end Close(iain) end return Lisitng 1: The Initialise MainfJ procedure used by Setup.rexx Rather than embed specific field name definitions within the example scripts I’ve opted for the more versatile approach of producing a separate program that can create blank record random access files of any chosen type.
This month's code, a program called Setup.rexx (which you'll find on the cover disk), does exactly this. It starts by asking you for a filename and the number of fields that will be present in each record. Having got that information it opens a separate 'header' file (a file of the name you supplied but with a .hdr name extension) and writes a field count, the name and sizes of the fields you supply, and the number of initialised records written to the fife.
Once the header file has been created and closed a call is made to an InitialiseMainQ routine (see listing 1). This attempts to open and initialise the main data file that will hold the random access records. Initialisation is very straightforward with blank record fields being created using: record=record||Left(’',ffeld_size,BLAXKJ As each field is defined an appropriate number of blanks get added to the record definition.
There are simpler ways of setting records to all blanks but this approach is more generally useful since, where necessary, it may be used to initialise each field within the record with different 'empty marker' values.
Providing the specified file is successfully opened, the initialisation code uses a loop to locate the position of each record and store the initial blank records in the file. The routine that actually handles the record writing is called WriteRecordO and it looks like this: llriteflecord: Procedure arg nain, record, position call Seekfiair, Cposi11on*Length(record),1B') call Mritechliain, record) return Notice how the byte position of a given record within a file is calculated. We multiply the record number by the length of a complete record. For this to work we need to adopt the convention
that the first record in the file is record 0, the next record one and so on. For normal purposes users like to regard record one as the first record in a file so it is necessary to subtract one from any user-oriented record numbers supplied to the above routine. That's where the i-1 comes from within the inner do-end loop of listing 1!
Over to you!
Take a look at the script on the disk, try running it (using the rx command) at a Shell window and look at the sizes and contents of the files produced. Confirm they represent the right sizes for the record definitions you supply. (1 should mention at this stage that the example code has been deliberately kept free from error checking code in order to allow the main framework to be easily seen.) It works but for any long term serious use, error checking of supplied fields would obviously be advisable.
IEqi Amiga Computing Neil Mohr has some horrible flashbacks to his school days ight, tables. These are one early addition to the HTML standard that was desperately needed. With a little bit of planning you can get quite complex layouts that would be otherwise unattainable using the normal HTML tags available.
A table allows you to define a rectangular space in an HTML document. This space can be split into any number of rows, which themselves can have any number of cells held in them. It is in these cells that you can place text and pictures. The easiest way of think about tables is as a grid, and each cell can contains text or pictures.
Before I describe the various tags associated with tables I should say that the way you go about creating tables is very important. Once you have started, you define the table on a row for row basis. That is( you start your first row, say what cells you want in it, then go on to the next row.
TA8LE WIDTH = ”pixle$ |percentage" BORDER CELLSPACING = value CELLPADDING = value CLEAR - Left|right|aLI BGCOLOR = value N0WRAP CAPTION CAPTION TR TR TABLE Quickly looking at the table attributes - I NEED MY OWN SPACE, MAN Just before I go for good I think it is worth mentioning one little technique that I have come across a few times on my travels around the Web. Commonly known as the single pixel GIF 'thing it gives you a way to get more accurate layout outs, well essentially pixel perfect layout.
Before you can start you need to create your self a transparent single pixel GIF image, either Personal Paint or Photogenics 2 should do the trick. So what use is that you may be asking yourself, well using this in conjunction with the IMG tag's WIDTH, HEIGHT or HSPACE and VSPACE attributes you can space to your Web site or white space as it is know in the Publishing industry.
So how do you use this then, well say you want to run a margin down the side of some text, all you would do is at the start of the text insert the line: WIDTH allows you to say how wide the table should be in either pixels or a percentage of the browser window. Most people only use a 640 wide window, so you could constrain table to, say, 600 pixels wide.
Cellspacing and cellpadding allows you say how many pixels should be left blank between ceils and around the cell's contents. CLEAR stops text flowing around the table. Only one caption tag is allowed within a table.
A new table is defined by using the TABLE tag, the end of the table is shown with the close tag TABLE the table definition has to be contained within these two tags. To add a new row to the current table, use the TR table row tag, within this you can add as many TD table data cells as you like. These two tags do have corresponding close tags, but generally browsers automatically assume them closed when they come upon another occurrence of the same tag. So when a browser comes across a second TD tag, the first is closed. Quick example; table border=t tr td cell 1 tr td cell 2
td cetl 3 table This creates a small table with three cells in it, one on top and two bellow. The browser will automatically size the table - to precisely fill the cells. This is how the generic table works. Creat- img src='single.gif align=feft width=40 height=400 Now there are a couple of things to consider here, firstly Aweb does not support image scaling, so in Aweb this would not work. So the alternative would be to use the spacing attributes which would look like this: img src='rsingle.gif align=feft hspace=20 vspace=200 Remember that the space adds the same amount to either
side, so only half the number of pixels need to be used. Again this will work in Aweb and iBrowse but not in Voyager, but really it is the more correct way of using this technique, how hum, I sure this will added soon.
Ing tables like this is a good way of testing them before you add the clutter of image and text tags.
So, as you can see, basic table use is simple.
It allows you to place graphics and text a little more neatly on screen, and of course using the P ALIGN= ... tag you position it on screen to some extent.
To make tables more flexible in how they lay out the cells, a number of attributes are provided in the TD tag.
TD NOWRAP ROWSPAN = value COLSPAN = value ALIGN = left|right|center VALIGN = top j center|bot toi WIDTH = pixels(percentage BGCOLOR = value* body text TD Straightforward tags such as VALIGN and ALIGN allow you to force cell contents to middle or sides of a cell. Again, with width, you can try to force the browser to restrict the size of individual cells, but this may not always be possible.
BGCOLOR lets you specify a value such as for white, and so colour individual celis.
This leaves ROWSPAN and COLSPAN - two very useful attributes that allow you to break up the otherwise grid like layout. One example would be if you inserted COLSPAN = 2 into the first TD tag in the previous example. This makes that cell spread across the top of the other two.
ROWSPAN is a little more tricky as you have to make sure your following HTML corresponds to the number of rows you have stated. This allows you to create a column in a table - great for running blocks of text down your page.
Again, adjusting the fast example, change the COLSPAN to ROWSPAN and make it equal 3, and insert a TR between the TD Cell 2 and next TD tag. Reload the page and you will see the first cell runs down the left side. (By the way setting ROWSPAN or COLSPAN to zero means span all rows or cells.)
Oh dear, it seems I've run out of space and out of issues, for good use of tables check out the AC Web site at www.idg.co.uk amigacomp The index page is fairly complex and the ACAS page adds margins that look better.
Amiga Computing Paul Overaa uses Electronic Arts' cmpByteRun 1 compression to provide a few tips I had an e-mail from a guy called Ian Howie a few weeks ago who, though heavily into 680x0 coding, was having problems dis- HH playing IFF pictures. The data in these files is normally compressed using a technique called cmpByteRun 1 compression and the difficulties related to the decompressing of ILBM body chunk data prior to jamming the resultant graphics bytes into a screen's bitplanes. In short, some 680x0 code was needed to handle the decompression work.
Function Conversion The standard way of doing this is to use a routine called unpackrowf) which was placed in the public domain by Electronic Arts. Like many coders, I wrote my own decompression routine in the early days in order to make sure that I really understood how the cmpByteRun 1 scheme worked and, once I had written it, have tended to use it in place of the standard code. My version was written in C and it was only when the above query cropped up that I sat down and produced a 680x0 version.
The translation of a C routine into a 680x0 equivalent is not usually that difficult The most important thing, as you might expect, is to have a detailed understanding of what the C code is doing.
Luckily the algorithm for the decompression in this case is simple: You read through the IFF body chunk data looking at each byte treating them as "signed" numbers.
If, while reading the source info, you find a value between 0 and 127 you then read and copy one more than that number of subsequent bytes to the chosen destination. Reading a value of 10 therefore means you copy the next eleven bytes of the source
(i. e. the body chunk) to the destination (a bitplane).
If, on the other hand, the byte read is negative you do one of two things: If the value lies between
- 1 and -127, instead of copying bytes you disregard the sign and
duplicate the next byte that many times plus one. Values of
-128 are even easier to do get byte n if n =0 increment n
and update current row length copy Cn+1) bytes } else if
n!=-128 negate n, incretent n and update current rou lengti
duplicate (n+t) bytes ) } }while(condition); update original
pointer values Listing It Basic framework of the C code
fexcluding error handling) deal with because you simply ignore
them!
The normal reason for producing a 680x0-based version of a C routine is either to gain additional speed or to allow for easier use in assembly language programs. That said, whenever 1 do any of these translations I always code it initially as though the routine will be used from C. Why? - because in most cases this enables any new equivalent 680x0 version to be tested using the same program that the routine was taken from. You simply comment out or delete the C routine (keeping the function prototype of course) and instead link your C code with the object code produced by the assembler.
If, for simplicity, we ignore the problems of error handling (which involves checking to see that oversized screen display rows are not produced) then the basic framework of the routine in C-ish pseudocode is that shown in listing 1. Creating a 680x0 version just requires us to produce the same overall structure - you can see how I've done this in listing 2. Once this plan is available translation becomes simply a matter of hanging suitable code onto each of the sections and you'll be able to get these details from the coverdisk example code.
I've also put my C version of the cmpByteRun 1 unpacking routine, UnPackRow.c, on disk and you'll see that it has this function prototype: BOOL error=UnPackRow(BYTE **souree_p, BYTE
* *destj), WORD rowSue) Notice that the first two parameters are
'pointers to pointers' - in other words this routine expects to
be passed the addresses of the source and destination
pointers. The reason is that the routine needs to modify and
update the source and destination pointers each time it is
called and it can only do this if it knows whereabouts in
memory those pointers are kept For the parameter passing,
incidentally. I've opted for the conventional stack-based
approach and you'll find that the new 680x0 version collects
the source, destination, and rowsize parameters in aO, al and
do in this fashion: J nPackRov ¦ove.l 4(a7),a0 move.1 8(a7),a1
move.v 12(a7),dQ The reason for the 4,8,12 offsets is that C
parameters are pushed onto the stack in right to left order
so we end up with the word-sized 'rowsize' parameter lying
furthest away from the return address.
And that's pretty much all there is to it Once the routine was complete I assembled and linked it into a C program for testing, and the job was finished.
Needless to say plenty of byte-saving could now be done but for me the time for doing such things is always after the routine has been written and tested. During the initial writing period the only consideration I'm interested in, and you'll see this from the example code, is keeping the structure and purpose of the code dearly visible!
Doj*hile_loop; iove,b d1=original V variable c iip * b *0,d1 blt.s n_Uss_than branch if n Listing 2 (a2)+,d1 Amiga Computing Displaying Pictures Paul Overaa provides some notes on Intuition Image drawing Illlllllll .
Nee the C newcomer has reached the point where he can open an Intuition window and identify IntuiMessages, chances are that the next objective will be to leam howto draw things on the screen. Intuition's arrangements for drawing graphics into mul- tiple-bitplane displays are, in terms of the underlying ideas, rather complex but luckily there is a pre-written library routine called DrawlmageO, which makes the job of displaying graphics a piece of cake.
0 DrawlmageO requires graphics data to be described using something called an Image structure, but even this is not a problem because there are various utilities that can convert standard IFF pictures and brushes directly into these structures.
Morten Eriksen's Shareware PicCon program is particularly useful, as is the BrushCon utility written by Ken Howe (which can be freely distributed).
Once this conversion operation has been done the image structure is ready for use either by reading this graphics data directly into the source code of the program or by specifying the file holding the structure as a header file to be included during compilation.
You'll find the details of the DrawlmageO routine and the Intuition Image structure definition in the accompanying box outs. To begin with, you will rarely need to worry about the internal structure details because the required data will be generated by the IFFImage conversion program. What you do need to know, however, is how to set up the parameters needed for the DrawlmageO call Pointers Pointers (variables which hold addresses), and especially pointers to system structures, appear frequently in Amiga code and the DrawlmageO statement that you'll find in the example source,
Drawlmage(window_p- RPoiX &test_image,8,15), is no exception.
The first parameter is a pointer to the window's rastport (drawing area) and you will have already 50 ?
¦L.frit* Pi.pl.y - - 0 J Oj. • , 0 • - o | And, for* dt&piay, 8 f * that'sr ait th**r** t& to ilf*
o • o • o • o • o • o • o i Just us* th* iadg t to qultl Imago
drawing courtesy of function: DrauIiageO Description: This is
Intuition's high-level Inage draving routine Call Fomat:
Dra«Iiage(rastport_p, iiage_p, left_offset, top_offset);
Arguments: rastport_p pointer to a RastPort iiage_p pointer to
an Iiage structure left_offset a general left offset which will
be used with ail of the inked Inage structures of a particular
DmlnageO call.
Top.offset a general top offset uhich will be used uith all of the linked Inage structures of a particular DravIiageO call.
Return Value: None Her examples and in fact the event handling loop is actually simpler than last month's offering because we are only detecting the use of the window’s close gadget This month, incidentally, I've also included Ken Howe's BrushCon utility on disk so you can try replacing my test image with one of your own. Just create a similarly sized brush (or modify the window size details in the example's OpenWindow- TagsO function call to produce a window of a suitable size for the image you wish to display), and then convert that brush to an image structure called testjmage naming the
file testjmage.h. Having done that, recompile the example and your new graphic will appear when the program is run.
Graphics data, such as is found in an Image structure, needs to be held in chip memory and from C this is normally indicated to the compiler by using a keyword such as chip or chip in the image data definition. Not all compilers are the same (although DICE, Storm C and SAS C all recognise chip) and so, depending on the compiler you are using, you'll probably need to manually edit the image definition file that BrushCon creates and insert a couple of underscore characters in front of the 'chip' keyword that you'll find. Other than that, everything should be plain sailing.
Seen how this is obtained in previous examples that used the intuition library's PrintlTextO function. In short, if window_p is the address of a Window structure (i.e. the software entity that represents the Intuition window that physically appears on the screen) then the address of the associated rastPort for that window will be given by the expression: window j- RPort.
For the second parameter, &testjmage, I've simply' used Cs address-of (&) operator to specify the address of a statically defined Image structure. For example purposes a brush was created and saved using Dpaint (and as you'll see I'm no artist), then BrushCon was used to convert it to an image held in a separate header file called testjmage.h. All that was needed was a preprocessor include statement include "testjiage.fi" near the start of the main program source to specify that this extra file be read in and used during compilation.
As always, you'll find a runable example and all associated source code on the coverdisk. The bulk of the code follows the same arrangements as ear- struct Isage VQRD LeftEdge; I* left edge offset *1 WORD TopEdge; * top edge offset * WORD Width; * pixel width * WORD Height; I* pixel height *1 WORD Depth; * iiage depth Cbitplane count) *1 UWORD *UageData; * pointer to word-aligned data * UBVTS PtanePick, PlaneOnOff; I* plane selection state * struct Iiage fNextIiage; I* next iiage to render * ; The Intuition Image structure: LeftEdge and TopEdge are offsets from the top left of the
display element The Width and Height fields indicate the size of the image and Depth tells the system how many bitplanes are in use. PlanePick identifies the planes in the real display which have been picked to receive the defined image data, and PlaneOnOff tells the system what to do with those planes that are not picked. Nextimage is a pointer which allows any number of Image structures to be linked together and displayed with a single call to the Intuition DrawlmageO routine.
Amiga Computing OCTOBER 1997 And now, the time has come, to face the final curtain... Yes it's the end of the road my friends. As TinkyWink would say, "Bye bye" Future releases D (D co Although we're not going to be around to write about them, there are some excellent games coming along in the next few weeks. Imminent releases include Myst which is set to be released by ClickBOOM on the Amiga after proving to be a great success on the Mac and PC Expect its arrival in a few weeks.
Likewise, Epic is planning on bringing out Flyin' High any time soon. The fast and furious arcade racer will be on CD-Rom and floppy disk and should be available for order within about a month.
Oxyron has penned in a release date sometime in September for its latest project, the stunning looking Doom clone, Trapped 2 and German games developers Titan Software hope to release the futuristic flight si, Shadow of the Third Moon at about the same time.
Amiga Action may be out for the count but there is still plenty of quality software on the way so you'd better start saving your pennie....
i. V.
• iz=i.'43
- j - -V ¦ - Back in April we brought you news of Macclesfield
developer Pandemonium and its new 3-D tank combat game,
Machines of the Wastelands. Now, after months of coding and
hundreds of cans of Cola and dial-a-pizzas, the game is ready.
Set on a desolate planet where tribes of Goblins fight each other for their world's last resources, the game involves directing a tank about a barren desert blowing up everything you lay eyes on.
It also involves an element of business as well - if you don't pay your crew enough, they will leave your employ. A novel gambling feature allows you to recruit crew for almost no cash if your lucky number comes up.
The game as yet doesn't have a publisher but anybody interested in finding out more about Goblin Tanks should phone: 0161 485 5231 news news . __ news ®i s.:;:* Vulcan 3 1 Player I wk Vulcan Software has announced it is to release a game creation tool capable of creating true 3-D environments. The utility, the Vulcan 3D Player, will allow the user to create game environments with 360 degree rotation and up and down movements. Corridors, tunnels and crevasses can be built, windows and ledges positioned, and the walls and floors given surface textures.
Objects such as barrels, tables, drinks machines and crates can be added and enemies positioned. Enemies can be chosen from the default characters supplied, or you can create your own. Intelligence levels can also be determined.
Vulcan hopes that its tool will be used by Amiga aficionados to create their own Doom clones, with the finished results being posted on Aminet. Hopefully, custom created games and levels will become as widespread and well used as the custom Marathon and Quake levels currently available on the Internet.
Fingers crossed that there won't be any problems with compatibility - the utility also supports AGA and 90 per cent of all known graphics cards.
For more information contact Vulcan at: -http: www.vulcan.co.uk Valhalla 5 FI Buyout Vulcan Software has announced that it is to continue the successful Valhalla series. Valhalla 5 will be CD-Rom based and will contain over 50 interactive characters and a vocabulary of 10,000 words.
There will apparently be four huge levels each with its own redefined visual screen with cinematic graphics. As with most Vulcan games, Valahalla 5 will be available in English, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch and Danish.
PULSTAR A team of developers calling itself Fullspeed Creative Developments has just finished writing an old school style platform arcade blaster.
GAME PAUSED A Bearing something of a resemblance to the classic R- Type, Pulstar requires you to fly a starfighter through many different stages on various planets.
T .. w* Game bosses are the order of the day here with some being so huge they don't fit onto the screen. Luckily you'll have the required firepower to defeat these giant sized bad guys
- Fullspeed Creative Developments say that there game includes
the biggest weapon system ever!
The two biggest Amiga licenceware companies in the UK have decided to combine their efforts to support the Amiga. After five weeks of negotiations, 5th Dimension has decided to buy out FI Licenceware.
The buyout will result in the establishment of a new Amiga based licenceware company, FI Software, which will be based in Goldthorpe, South Yorkshire. The two companies' product ranges will, for the moment be kept separate, but will total over 200 in number. As well as classic games and utilities, new products are under development.
The company will remain 100 per cent Amiga dedicated and intends to work on developing the American side of its operations.
For more details visit FI Software's page at: http: www.ware5d.demon.co.uk Adios my AMIGAs Yup, I guess you know by now that this is our last magazine. I've been working here for nearly a year now and have witnessed the Amiga story change from one of woe to one of hope.
Amiga has got a rich and powerful owner and people all over the world seem to be coding some impressive games. BlackBlade is set to blow our socks off, Alive is set to release some of the best games in recent years and Vulcan is continuing to churn out quality game after quality game.
We won't be here any longer but, believe me, the future's looking bright. Anyway, so long everybody and thank you for buying the mag... mm ACTION REVIEW STRATEGY He’s got the whole world in his hands... Hugh Poynton plays God for a day Some God games let you run a city, some a business empire, some even let you dictate the fortunes of a country. Sid Meier's Civilization lets you run an entire race.
The simple aim of the game is to guide your chosen people through millennia of human history. It starts 6000 years ago when the world's first cities were established and you must guide your people through times of hardship, deciding whether or not to make war or peace with your neighbours, where to establish trade and strive to invent technologies that will give your race the edge. The game only ends when you send your people off to colonise the stars.
The decisions to make are end less - will your civilisation be a ruthless, totalitarian bully state that conquers and plunders to gain valuable resources? Or will your people be peaceful, achieving the lead by trade and scientific research?
Everything has been thought out in painstaking detail. Technological advancements and progress are all dependent on the smallest things. Thousands of years ago the Mongol empire became one of the largest and most successful warrior civilisations because of its invention of the stirrup and hence the ability not just to ride a horse but to fight from it. The same goes for Civilization, master the art of horseback riding and you'll be given a golden opportunity to get one over on other civilisations. Likewise mastering other practices and technologies will transform your people from a
primitive tribe to a prosperous empire, to (if you play your cards right) a space faring people.
The way you govern your tribe will influence what happens to it in the future. Different models of government are included in the game. A system of Monarchy will mean that your rule is absolute. With the help of the upper classes or aristocracy your rule will be strong - however, the aristocratic classes will eat up much of your resources for the upkeep of their military units.
Just as past kings of England have found out, the aristocracy can be your greatest weapon and your worst enemy. Communism will cut down drastically on corruption but have a detrimental effect on trade. Run a republic and trade will boom, but senates can override any decision you may want to take. In a democracy the economic growth is very high, allowing you to plough resources into scientific research and improving the standard of living, but you must keep the populace happy or risk a revolution. It's all a valuable lesson in politics and a damn sight easier than reading Machiavelli's "The
Prince".
Civilization is the God game. It'll take you months to master and you're going to have to wrap your head around some weighty concepts, but it'll be worth it. Other games require you to learn reams of stuff about fictional races and planets. Try your own, you might like it.
THE LOW-DOWN PUBLISHER Guildhall DEVELOPER Microprose CONTACT 01302 890000 PRICE £14.99 DISKS 1CD TOMB RAIDER 2 V' RAPID RACER TIME CRISIS OPINIONS ON EVEHYEAMSg k Japocalypse V MDK ACTUA SOCCER 2 FROGGER DEATHTRAP DUNGEON VANDAL HEARTS KICK OFF 97 ACTION FEATURE INTERVIEW
- liSgig As I walked into the north-east London Pub where I was
to interview Alive MediaSoft, the first thing that struck me
was that they all had a look of eager anticipation that made
them look like kids on Christmas Eve.
That isn't much of a surprise when you consider what the future holds for Alive MediaSoft. The brainchild of two die hard Amiga enthusiasts, Andy Reed and Stephen Alive MediaSoft looks set to revolutionise the Amiga games market - Hugh Poynton investigates Flowers, the new Amiga games company looks set to revolutionise the Amiga games scene in the next few months.
It is called Alive because of Andy's frustration at the endless stream of "the end is nigh, the Amiga is dead" articles appearing in the Amiga press. The company has a tremendous card up its sleeve - a new CD-based Macintosh emulator which allows you to play Mac games on the Amiga without having to ever see the Mac OS, programming the joystick or leeching speed from the game.
With other Mac emulators tor the Amiga you need to create a separate file that works like a hard drive on which to install all the Mac info and then you need the latest system software and install it.
Rather a lot of work just to play a game. Alive will sell Mac games with a special emulator disk - all you'll have to do is click the game icon, and you'll be in. Everything has been designed to make the process as easy as possible. "It's designed for people who have never used an Amiga, We've made it as easy as we possibly can" says Andy.
"We have been talking to the various companies who produced the original games and copyright isn’t as much of a problem as you'd at first think. Because no code has been altered, and the Cds and CD packaging hasn't been changed, ail Alive is doing in effect is buying the CD and selling it on", says Andy. Alive is, in effect, just planning to wrap the Cds in shrink wrap plastic that will have "For the Amiga" on. It's all totally legal and done with the original publishers', whether it be Sierra or lucasArts, full consent.
The beauty of the Mac emulator is, providing permission is granted hy the various publishers, a huge wealth of games can now be released onto the Amiga. As long as the initial reaction to these Mac releases is good, Alive hopes to be able to bring out a new Mac game every month.
The company has a huge stack of games waiting for a release and eventually plans a release strategy unlike anything any other software company has ever attempted. Steve says, "We're going to put out a wish-list saying, look we have these games, what do you want? We are not going to release something that people are not going to buy. We will just that say we're willing to do these games, which do you want? If you want, say, X- Wing next month, you'll have X-Wing next month."
Alive, however, isn't just going to bring out Mac games. In addition to the excellent looking Haunted, it has got reams and reams of storyboards and ideas for its own games.
It is also eager to sign any new developers for the platform - with the wealth of talented Amiga programmers about at the moment, they should have no difficulty. "The emulator will get us established," says Andy, "once we're established we can take on developers and publish their games. We've also got loads of games ideas ourselves, we'd love to publish a 3-D fighting game."
Andy and Steve are thrilled at the prospect of launching a new Amiga games company, and rightly so. After months of exhaustive research and planning, Alive is about to embark on stage one of its master plan. The Mac emulator is ready, Haunted is almost complete, and the market is more than ready for them.
"There are lots of utilities and hardware out there.
There is not a great deal of game soft- ACTION FEATURE INTERVIEW ware out there and, when you think about it, 70 per cent of people want to play games."
Says Andy.
Whether by design or by accident, Alive seems to have chosen the best possible time to start up. As the Amiga games market starts to shake itself awake after a couple of years in a coma, any decent Amiga game will make a killing.
Andy is excited about the rejuvenation of the market - rather than being concerned about his competitors games titles, he is excited. "The games will stimulate the market, get more people buying. At the moment we have Vulcan's new game, we have Epic's new game title and Sadness have got its new game...we have this little wave at the moment, but hopefully it'll become a big tidal wave - we want to be on the surfboard so we can catch that wave."
Which it undoubtedly will - Haunted looks set lo be one of the best adventure games produced in years, with real-time rendered animated cinema sequences and proper FMV sequences. Like other recent Amiga games, the quality of Haunted actually exceeds that of many PC games.
Why has there been a sort of renaissance in Amiga games and why are we seeing a profusion of excellent quality games such as Shadow of the Third Moon? Andv believes that new titles are looking so good simply because they actually realise the full potential of the Amiga. In the past, the potential was never realised simply due to laziness.
"The were so many big publishers out there that had a perfectly good A500 game engine, when the A1200 came out they just ported it over. Team 17 came along and brought out Alien Breed 3D and proved all the critics wrong with a decent Doom clone.
Now you can't just rest on your laurels like a lot of the big publishers did. You've got to really sell yourself. You can now use the Amiga to its full capacity, what with all the accelerator cards and graphics cards. It's now running in the red limit zone. In the past it was just ticking along at a 1000 revs."
Alive is adamant it will not fall into the trap other Amiga games manufactures have.
It shares Vulcan boss Paul Carrington's belief that the future for the Amiga is to update and that its games must reflect this. "Our games will be CD based, they will support PPC," says Steve. When pushed as to whether Alive will bring out any PPC only games, Andy says, "We've heard so many rumours about PPC, Amiga International is umming and ahhing as to whether or not to go PPC.
We are making all of them both 68k and PPC. If PPC is the Amiga, then we wili be PPC."
So, is breaking into the Amiga games market an intimidating experience? Far from it apparently - it seems as though Alive's reception into the Amiga games market has been a thoroughly pleasant experience.
Andy and Steve have nothing but praise for just about anybody they've dealt with while setting up the company. Team 17's Andy Davidson in particular. "Team 17 was brilliant, Andy said he'd give me any help with Lightwave, if I needed any tutorials, videos or anything to do with Amiga" says Steve.
Likewise, Vulcan Software couldn't have been more helpful. Paul Carrington has offered the company advice and practical help - even down to offering to burn Cds for them. This friendliness isn't just Amiga enthusiasts helping each other out, it also mum, CD-Rom and plenty of expandability - 4Mb only costs about £15 now. A base computer with a little HD and 10Mb of Ram would be perfect Although it's still early days yet, Alive has a catalogue of games and a commercial battle plan that would make other, bigger software companies go green with envy. But they've got another hidden
ingredient that more or less assures them success. "We will never give up" declares Steve. "We are passionate about the Amiga to the point of being obsessive, as long as there are people out there with an Amiga, we'll write games for them."
Makes good business sense. "Everybody is willing to help everybody, because if there is no Amiga games market then everybody goes out of business" says Andy. Companies such as Vulcan want and need the competition.
Talking to Andy, Steve and the rest of the Alive crew, you get the feeling that the Amiga, and the Amiga games market, is set for quite a revival. Providing of course, Gateway and Amiga International play their cards right.
Although Alive is confident about the Amiga's future there is an awareness that things have got to be done right this time, "It's encouraging that the Amiga has an owner," says Andy about the Gateway buyout, "but this is the third time the company has been bought and I think It'll probably be the last, if something doesn't happen now, they won't have another shot."
So what would be Alive's dream machine then? "We would both like to see both a big graphics machine, and also something that's smaller and cheaper than the average PC in Dixons that would attract mum and dad out buying a computer for Christmas. I'd like to see a £600 base machine, with an 030 miniAs I make my goodbyes and prepare to get the tube home, I can't shake the feeling that I'm going to hear a hell of a lot more about, these guys and all of it's going to be good.
So what has Alive got to offer in the next few months? We take a look: Phatasmagoria Phatasmagoria will be one of Alive's first releases. Squeezed onto a monster 7 Cds, the game will require a minimum of an 030 processor, quad speed CD-Rom, 8 Mb Ram and 15 Mb of hard disk space.
Doom ID's legendary multiplayer shoot 'ern-up will be playable with four times the screen resolution of the PC and 30 rock hard levels. You'll need an 030 accelerator, quad speed CD-Rom and 8 Mb of Ram.
Haunted Alive's 'baby', this game will use FMV, blue screen filming, and real-time rendered animated sequences. For this you'll need an 030 accelerator, quad speed CD-ROM and 8 Mb of Ram.
We take a look at BlackBlade's long awaited futuristic flight sim A few months ago, a Web site appeared belonging to a group of Italian coders calling itself BlackBlade. The Web site featured a series of screenshots that looked far too good to be true. Smoke trails, sleek, dangerous jets swooping down beautiful voxel modelled valleys. To quote Chris Evans, thought, "Never gonna happen, never gonna hap- tos and information from satellites and maps and then pieced the data together to create a 3-D representation of say, Mount Olympus Moons on Mars or the San Francisco Bay Area.
These amazing ... a pen .
The months wore on and eventually we managed to get hold of a beta test version of the game. Being a cynical sod, I never though Shadow of the Third Moon would live up to the hype. I was convinced the thing wouldn't work and if it did it wouldn't be worth the code it was written with. The front end looked nice, very nice and was accompanied by some crisp clear slightly ambient dance music. That still didn't prove anything, t needed to actually play the game.
Believe me, it does live up to the hype. In its final finished form this game will be the finest on the Amiga - even in its beta test version it beats most hands down.
The graphics are stunning. They remind me of those computer generations you used to see on telly a few years back where they got phographics are created using a tool designed specifically for the game, BlackBlade's 3DTIS (Terrain Imaging System). This has allowed the BlackBlade designers to draw realistic landscapes with much higher definition than classic, chunky, A500-!ike vectorial graphics you see on a lot of flight si ms. The Voxel rendering allows beautiful valleys, peaks and lakes to be created with fantastic attention to detail. A lake isn't just blue, it's textured with
white along the water's edge to represent the water lapping the shores of the The valleys and mountain peaks look just as realistic. Fly down a valley at top speed and it gives an impression of speed I haven't seen in other games. Other details that really grab your attention are things like the semi-transparent smoke that trails from a rocket or a damaged fighter or the photo-realistic sky.
The weapons effects are also top notch. The You've quite an stock of weapons with which to load up your fighter closest comparison I could make with other games would be Terminal Velocity mixed with Comanche and a liberal dose of X-Wing for good measure.
Soundwise, you can't fault it. Obviously this is only an early version so not all the sound effects are in place just yet, but those I've heard so far bode well for the game. Unleash a rocket and you'll hear the roar as it streaks towards its target Slow up an oil tank and you'll hear a huge, resounding boom. A la Wipe- Out and games of that ilk, your chaos wreaking will be accompanied with dance music. Unfortunately there's no Leftfrefd or Under- world here, hut the coders who've done the music are still pretty skilled. Despite them something of a duff name (The SoundWavers}, the tunes
aren't bad at all.
The game looks the bees knees at the moment but, as it is still a beta lest version, there is only one mission and that is against a ground based target with no aerial opposition.
This is fine for checking out the graphics, the various weapons and the control systems of the plane but it only hints at the game's full potential.
This game could be immense. The long valleys and towering peaks would be absolutely ideal for aerial battles - you'd have to take into consideration loads more tactics than the average flight sim because, in addition to belting along at a furious speed, your vehicle can hover and even fly backwards. You could have games where you hover behind a peak and pop up to take out the enemy.
Surprisingly the isn't that system Although you get the best results a very high speed j the version we got our grubby mitts on ran along at about 12 frames per second on our 040 A4000. According to the developers the game is perfectly playable at any speed above 6 fps. You should be able to milk that sort or performance out of an 030 processor with 4Mb of Ram. The game supports PPC and pretty much any graphics card you'd care to mention.
This really is the sort of game the Amiga needs at the moment, ft looks as though it is going to be fantastic in its own right but it'll also be a showcase for the sort of games you can create for the machine and set a standard for other developers to aspire to. The release date is in August so upgrade your machine and Crashed! Time to pick another plane ACTIO N TIPS SOLUTION Parti vo of our Big Red Adventiire cheat guide and if you Go bac after col dio lights new scene loon. Fly Once inside the hotel room and enter the toilet your prize and adding the stu~ your inveffory. TliLaktidfrln a h
abovsi le museum museum, Once you ai%i up to the porter in the ticket. Selec then put the ticket inventory, using the in room and swit This blocks out alarm going off.
Now go into the the cassette with the ri the computer - in the centre of the park you 'will find a small boy. He's playing a cheap held Russian game console. Swap your isive computer for the cheapo console off... [eaving Gorky Park you will talk to a trying to sell you a knocked off watch. DonT'buy it but remember where you saw him for fuhire reference. Head off to the railway station anfetfind the cash point machine. Stick the tWisole cartridge into the card slot and you will as allowed to withdraw 100 roubles.
You will come back to the’sjatjon later in the game, but for now head backflg the park after noticing the KGB TV buildinglLnext to The story so far - Doug has just.fompleted two of the three questions he needs to enter the KGB TV quiz show.
The Park Go back up to your hotel room and retriev your computer. Walk off to Gorky Park with the station. On your way to the park, stop by the huge queue and talk to the man with thej big beard. Ask him to buy a tin of caviaj return for a loo roll. Go back to the.
Buy some bog roll from the stret this will cost you the 100 roujgfes from the cash point.
Once you have the locjFoll, head back to ueue to swap it fomne tin of caviar. Now exarrfce the tin to fiiwithe answer to the final the freeJicket. There aren't any Rs on the laBlj! Now Jat you know all three answers, gowaighi back to the hotel foyer.
Back at the hotel lobby, go ask to borrow a pen to fill e ticket to fill it In and envelope in your II out the address.
Next, select the stamp fror your inventory in order to post the ticket correctly.
Leave the hotel and go to the*KGB Studios, located next to the Rail Station, tyjewou set there, post the letter. Now rush bacffo hotel and ask pie porter if th iu. He will n Studio.
Open the rep!
Ie Russian aste timi hand in the you a badge and the show. When straight on air.
There are ihjft questions about thieves answer and, ifyou answer them correctbf you go on to answer the big question ancUrfn an air balfood* If you didn't answer Ipfne questions corrjctly, you can still get trough the game - jjst follow our handy hiftts: MOCKBA EF WtycCKU.il rp‘if? I pw I A i gl if 4i
• J trios ijg i| : r 3__ ¦ '¦} sat Vi; 11 i) J f'S'je
ifiMjjjj i Stl
* * I I_ Sit lifijjf v m Mt* . .
: *1 6 £ z £ J I O' jdoc morning, can I hefo you?
For some cash point fraud sounds of opera, cases in tne-pmcess. Now pick up the ring and computer an ynto the crown room.
Select the diamond ring and use it on the crown case to cut a hole in the glass. The crown is now ready to be snatched but unfortunately not by you another thief suddenly appears and snatches the crown from under your m word for the Trotsky's mainframe computer is the name of the tenor who sings with Donna Catalefet the Bolshoi.
Leave the hotel in rei room again, with your picture in every, ne Firstly, go to the newsagents and buy a copy of Consolphobia magazine.
Examine it and find that the pa?
His charms on the receptionist Doug and head down meet some dodgy tell you that they hav Trotsky software main you to do it. In return burger place where you nds, Alex and Kos. They plan to break into the me and that they want y will give you a passport so you can leale Moscow before .arrested. that the mainframe computer is on The World-wide Communication Network and that their e-mail address is jLenin.Komm. Head back to your hotel room combine the TV remote control with the tap£%fiprder and then attach that to the 2X81.
You nown to find the mode number the WWC Netw( £. To do this, go to thg Studios and exarrwfe the receptiorydSk to find a scrap of paperkook aUUTT liece of paper to gain the Interflet dtJress for the WWC Network, wh[drf GB.NET 007 6 1 0.
Now you camptfe it on the telephone in your hotel rg m to get the tape recording for Alex aryjfrffos. Take the tape to Alex and Kos to geUwur passport and then head swiftly to the it ion and show your passport to the guard in order to board the Orient Express and get the hell out of there!
Switch The KGB Stu TIPS If You Lose The Quiz You win a consolation prize of a keyring and you are left in the studio. Pick up lights and use the keyring on order to enter a secret museum. Once inside the crown room and crown. This stops next room and recorder and follow the Win' ACTION I 63 ACTION REVIEW FEATURE You're either a dog person or a cat person. You either like the Rolling Stones or The Beatles.
You're a Quake fan or a Duke fan. It's just one of those things, you can't like both.
Duke on the Amiga? Well, nearly... Whereas Quake has always won fans because of its dark, sinister graphics and atmospheric sound effects, Duke is a lighter, airier, more tongue in cheek shoot 'em-up.
The game has won legions of fans because of its fun, slightly tasteless take on the 3-D shooter. Your Ray Bans and machine gun toting hero spits out witty quips and one liners as he dispatches hordes of furry aliens and innocent bystanders alike.
The weapons he uses to do this differ from the rather serious Quake armoury by including a number of bizarre and downright stupid guns and bombs. The self explanatory Shrinker Ray for example.
641 AMIGA ACTHOIU FEATURE reduces the enemy to the size of an action man so you can defeat him just by stomping on him.
Getting Duke Nukem 3D (and Quake) onto the Amiga has been something of a Holy Grail to Amiga developers - and now, both have been successfully ported. A few weeks ago, Amiga enthusiast John Selck announced that he had ported the Duke Nukem 3D games engine over to the Amiga.
Obtain a PC copy of Duke Nukem, pinch the group files and hey presto, you can wander about any Duke level at will. There's nothing to shoot "U r. f ¦: and it isn't a game by any standards but it paves the way for greater things.
For a start it will convince those who thought otherwise that a PC game can work on an Amiga. Unlike the ported Amiga Quake (which ran so slowly you could see each and every bullet plod towards you at snail like speed), Duke ran on the on the office 040 A4000 at a perfectly smooth speed. However, the Duke walkthroughs don't contain any enemies, which is apparently the most system hungry single element of most games.
At the moment nobody knows whether the Duke engine will be developed any further.
Although it is a fair bet that every major Amiga developer will be interested in a full port of Duke to the Amiga, the legal problems that haunted the Quake port could still trouble Duke.
However, with 3-D shoot 'em-ups proving to be a popular project for Amiga games developers, how long will it be before the platform has its own answer to Duke or Quake on the PC or Marathon on the MacUf some of the new projects emerging come to fruition, such as Genetic Species or Brainkiller, the answer would have to be, not long... Hugh Poynton fiddles with his chopper (stock helicopter joke 1243...) Six years ago, you'd be forgiven for thinking that Microprose made nothing but flight sims.
Retired Air Force colonel 'Wild' Bill Stealy seemed to be amassing his very own digital airforce. Any new game entering into the fray would have to be exceptional to have been noticed. Which is exactly what Gun- ship 2000 was. Mixing the Microprose attention to detail and real- j ism with the need for a fast and furious game, the I chopper sim offered play- I ers the opportunity to fly one of six different heli- copters in combat in six com- x. bat zones. M The six helicopters - the Blackhawk, Jetranger Kiowa, Hughes Defender, Apache, Commanche and Cobra all have different
strengths and abilities. Each chopper denotes a different type of mission. Pick the Blackhawk and youTI be doing a search and rescue mission, pick a Jetranger Kiowa and you'll be doing recon. All the others are ideally suited to blowing the crap out of things.
To give the game an additional element of challenge, you must attain certain ranks before flying certain helicopters like the Commanche or Apache Longbow. Likewise, only two combat zones, the Gulf and Western Europe, are open to you until you have proved yourself in battle.
The graphics are, even by modern standards, excellent. Although lacking in texture mapping or detailed voxel landscapes, Gunship 2000 uses thousands of v different tiles to create an unevenly contoured playing : s Varena. Because most of the | action takes place at tree I top level, the ground detail j is superb, follow a road to you target destination and telegraph poles will flash past your helicopter.
The whole thing is very realistic and well thought out. Copyright protection, for instance, is weaved into the game. You've got to feed the correct numbers into your GPS system before you can get the helicopter off the ground. Unlike other sims of the time, Gunship also allows you to direct other units to the target so you can end up co-ordinating a big task force to the required area.
This attention to detail and the huge amount of options available means the game retains its long term appeal; no matter how good you get, there will be still more to accomplish. Unlike its contemporaries, Thun- derHawk and LHX, the game could take months to complete because once one helicopter and combat environment is mastered, there are dozens more to try. Get good enough at Gunship and you'll be flying a state of the art Commanche. In addition to this, difficulty levels can be toggled so there are adverse weather conditions and highly trained enemies to overcome. A Although probably
not the game of choice for somebody who wants rather more arcade oriented action, Gunship 2000 is an excellent challenging and very absorbing sim. If you're a propeller head, go buy it, THE LOW-DOWN PUBLISHER Guildhall PUBLISHER Microprose CONTACT 01302 890000 PRICE £14.99 DISKS 4 GRAPHICS 92% 90% PLAYABILITY 92% DIFFICULTY Tricky OVERALL SCORE nMflt
- 30 • i -2C 0*1 P!f fTU TC :£LLC T0F. 31 V (VCCIF f uW, uc :]
As you can see the attention to detail is excellent - all those
dial things do stuff!
The main options screen allows you to pick the helicopter and the ordinance it will carry Hugh Poynton investigates Epic’s Sixth $ ense Investigations is the latest offering from Epic. As you might remember, Epic has decided to start releasing continental games in the UK and new releases front European developers. This offering cqpjs from the home of dodgy bank accounts-and the Milka Cow, Switzerland, CineTECH, the developer behind Shfth Sense Investigations, has apparently fajjcen its inspiration from the classic LucasArts point'll'click .adventure games such as Monkey Island. Presented in
a suitable cartoon style, the game follows a crazy young guy who has the ability to communicate with the spirit of a sarcastic man. A friend (who thinks of himself as a detective) profits from these psychic abilities. Quite predictably this leads them into crazy, funny situations which don't help in their quest to make money. All of which goes towards making the game sound utterly tedious.
Everything looks very nice. The graphics are bubbly and colourful and the characters and scenery all capture the attention. The main protagonist - the crap detective - looks suitably crap. Hunched over, hands in Mac he looks like a cross between the dou-
- ’opEn IJNhe GjyE | The Private Detectives chaotic office'-
still it isn't as messy as the AC offices!
This is the Private Dicks stomping ground, a wretched den of scum and villainy At the toy factory Private Dick quizzes a suspect who rants on about giant toys in pyjamas - nick him for possession!
In these 'interesting' times for the Amiga computer HiSoft would like to express its total commitment to the Amiga and its users. And what better way than offering you the best software and hardware products at unbeatable prices!
?t tZlSSG!
The Classic Squirrel and the Surf Squirrel have revolutionised the way you use your AT 200 and A6Q0 computers, making it possible to add up to 7 SCSI devices such us hard drives, scanners, Zip drives, CD-ROMs etc. With SCSI you gel a complete, easy-to-fit and easy-to-use system that is fast, reliable and expandable. Anri now it's even more affordable than ever!
As the developers of the famous Squirrel SCSI interfaces we have been able to shave margins to the bone and bring some unbeatable CD-ROM deals.
Just look at what you get in each of our great Squirrel CD-ROM packs: % Choice of internal or external CD-ROM drive.
Choice of 2-speed, 4-speed or 12-speed drives.
Choice of Classic Squirrel or Surf Squirrel interfaces.
Choice of 3 FREE CD lilies to get you started.
Power lead and cables where appropriate.
Full manuals on how to set up and use your new equipment.
Extensive after-sales support, direct from HiSoft.
All you have to do is pick up the phone and call our friendly sales staff, free of charge - we will advise you on I he best choice for your system and put together the best Squirrel CD-ROM pack you can buy.
The revolutionary Zip drive from Iomega is one of the major technological developments of the 90s, and it works perfectly on your Amiga with HiSoft's tailor-made Squirrel Zip kit.
SQUIRREL ZIPIOO PACK The complete Zip 100 pack for any SCSI-aware Amiga computer: Zip Drive including 1 cartridge with PC Mac Zip Tools, 25-way to 25-way SCSI lead, manuals etc. 11iSoft Amiga Zip Tools software with Amiga-specific user manual.
VS Special 25-wav to 50-way converter for use with Squirrel SCSI or other SCSI peripherals.
95 with Classic Stjuirrei £149“ £189 for existing SCSI Squirrel CD2X iCfasm: fyur rf. J- pvcd t K( ).w. chtMcenf 11 Hi I ( Ds*J 1319.95 Squirrel CD4X CD2X bur nub qujd CO-WOVC £ 149.95 Squirrel CD1 2Xfas CU2Xhut ithultra-fan TZ-yxn CD-UO U £239.95 Slirl 5quirrel Option ruuter Scif uftu-faw wul interface) - £30.00 Internal ()ptinn itnr filling in fmtt-r case nr your mui -£35.00 ’Current CD title* include AtiA Cxpericnu? 2, Gjotwl Atnrj a Experience, Gr.mdslam Gamer Gold.
Stveet Touch, Vvunicn oi the Web X The Kara Collection 95 2-Speed CD-ROM Classic Squirrel 3 CD Titles
• This amazing-vafue printer allows truly stunning
photo-realistic quality,
• u iih no banding, when used with the Canon Studio software
package.

• This pack includes printer, Amiga printer lead. Canon Studio
and
• free photo-realistic cartridge offer.
95 £249 Cinemo4D CD Edition £199,99 The whippet £49.95 Confused by all the hype about the internet? We're not surprised. But here is the no-nonsense, quit kslarl pack that contains all you need to conned, to send and receive email, to transfer files, to access those essential newsgroups and to browse the world wide web. The brand-new Enterprise Net&Web pack is a breeze to install and a jov to use - here's what you get: Megalosound £29.95 Clarity 16 sampler £99.95 ProMlDi interface £24.95 Media MAGIC £59.95 Maxon MAGIC £19.95 Disk MAGIC 2 £29.95 Twist 2 database £69.95 Termite Com ms £19.95
TermiteTCP £29.95 Ibrowse 1.1 f £29.95 Nets Wed 1 £29.95 Nets Web 2 £59.95 Web Explosion CD £44.95 Personal Paint 7.1 CD £24.95 Deupac 5 Assembler £49.95 Highspeed Pascal £69.95 Studio 2 £44.95 ProFligh t £19.95 SMD-WO S 4 IfideoCDs £169.95
- ENTERPRISE NET&WEB PACK
33. 6bps Fax Voice Modem - cream Modem A telephone leads Easy
install program Free 30-day trial account with Demon Internet
Net&Web Software FTP filt transfer Hi Soil Mail email
iBrowse browser Usenet newsreader f r i r t r i t i ¦
ENTERPRISE - NET&WEB+ PACK Everything in the Enterprise
Net&Web Pack (see left) plus ? TermiteTCP, software that
supports ppp for connection to any service provider.
I Amiga Surfin' Book, full of invaluable info on the internet.
£99 95 HiSOFT
- SYSTEMS - TO ORDER CALL OSOO 223 EGO Cril tree fwitfm the VK to
tufa UMtpnxktG. Whs your credit debit card Wwrcept Mastered
w _. C.-.w*. rv..., , ... cfl (ID fXIfJ (i)firPP fjrrua K
I I l vr i i J. ...j.____ ,, £129 95 sir Wit We are delighted
to announce the immediate availability' of the CD Edition of
the acclaimed CINEMA 4D raytracing package The CD Edition
includes a brand-new version of CINEMA 4D, many more textures,
scenes and objects ( 200 predefined materials, 400 bitmap
textures) and, as a special FREE bonus, Cinema WORLD and C
inemaFONT are included!
Make my own Cds? No, too expensive. Well, not any more with the branchnew SquirrelCDR system. Combining a brilliant, 2-speed write, 6-speed read CDR drive with the excellent commercial version of MakeCD, the SquirrelCDR system is unbeatable - just look at what you can do; Backup 650MB of hard disk in under 40 minutes.
Write up to 100 sessions per disc.
Create your own multimedia discs.
Create your own music discs.
Back-up CD-ROMs.
Back-up audio discs.
Back-up console games.
Play CD32 discs.
Play audio discs.
Back-up ANY compact disc!
Create Mac PC discs on your Amiga, Create mixed audio data discs.
Create bootable CD32 discs-perfect for demos!
Play CD-ROMs at 900kB per second.
Access all sessions of a PhotoCD.
I ?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
1 ?
?
1 r i [1 .
... * j Ideally suited for the Squirrel SCSI interfaces on the A t 200, the SquirrelCDR will also work on most SCSI-aware Amigas.
SquirrelCDR XL (eUtmjf drive. M.itK O, 5u T Squirn't, S jpiUJ difksi £469.95 SquirrelCDR GT ft'xl drive, MafceCO, 5 gold disks, w u SCSI i fa re) 099,95 SquirrelCDR I (internal drive, MakeCD, 5 go d disks, iv n SCSI i face) £349.95 MakeCD (full version with manual, tor private use) 09.95 Golcf Disk (fully warranted, 650Mb capacity* £4.95 95 £199
• • • • yj'-MW" • •••••••• whippet The Whippet is a fully
buffered, ultra high speed serial port capable of performing up
to 400% faster than the A1200's serial port.
Data transfers with The Whippet are guaranteed to be much faster, much safer and much more reliable than when using the standard Amiga serial port.
The Whippet really comes into its own when surfing the Internet. High speed drivers allow the use of web browsers, ftp clients, email clients, Usenet readers and other Internet tools, all at the same time without loss of data and with multitasking!
ITI'F.R RISK TOOLS
* ITU f. FRY Hl-I XUtH COMPATIBLE WITH All Amiga networking
software.
All Amiga Internet software.
All Amiga communications software.
TO ORDER FEATURES High performance serial port, up to 400% faster than the Amiga serial port.
The Whippet is fully buffered lor sater and reliable data transfer.
Up to 230,000 bps data transfer rate.
Industry standard 9-pin serial socket, 9-pin to 25-pin modem lead included.
You can order over the telephone on our f reeCall number 0500 223 660 using any popular credit or debit card or you can send us an order through the post with a cheque postal order. See our ad on the previous page for more details.
95 £49 See you In the future7 60060 support - render up to 100% faster New Material Manager inc material previews.
Materials now support colour, luminance, transparency, reflectivity, environment, fog, bump mapping, genlocking, highlights and highlight colouring as separate attributes.
* Unlimited number of materials on an object, i Lighting
system supports visible light, tens flares, glows, reflections,
soft and hard shadows, conical, parallel, decreasing and fixed
intensity light.
Camera supports depth of field blurring and tens adjustment to allow fisheye, wide angle or telephoto lenses.
% Internal CyberGraphX support.
Palette sharing on 256 colour screens.
CINEMA 40 has a long history' on the Amiga, being used all over the world by graphic studios, architects, television companies and enthusiastic amateurs.
Now its pedigree has been realised by the Macintosh and PC world who have raved about it (93% - MacFormal). Call us for a special cross-platform price.
The world famous Blizzard 1230 IV 50MHz accelerator board is now available from Hi Soft at a new, even lower price. Trust HiSoft to bring you the best Amiga products at truly affordable prices and with full technical support from Amiga experts.
This is the highest pertorming 68030 expansion you can buy for your A1200 and we can now offer it with a range of options to give you maximum choice - whichever way you go, you can be assured of top quality, fully warranted products with complete after-sales service from HiSoft, Blizzard 12304V (0Mb, 5QMf li 68030 & MMU, i2-bit Fast RAM expandable up to l28 25f Mbi £99.95 Blizzard 1230-IV 4Mb nViit. 60ns SIMM included, fitted) £119.95 Blizzard 1230-IV 8Mb fast. 60m SIMM inchM, fitted) £139.95 Blizzard 1230-IV 16Mb fiasr, 60ns 5 MM inMvl, fittedI £169.95 50MHz FPU Co-Processor (when purchased
with 1230-tV) £29.95 UPGRADE PRICES uer 2 to CD Edition CG9 Ifor 3 to CD Edition £29 BLIZZARD GOLD PACK 1 think it's safe to say that, over the years, Amiga Computing has been one of the strongest backers of the Magic User Interface. Being the sort of magazine to encourage readers to upgrade their machines, we were never put off by the slightly higher memory and processor requirements MUI needed.
Essentially, MUI filled a gaping hole in the Amiga operating system - a simple way for programmers to add a scaleable, font sensitive interface to their programs
- but MUI went beyond even this.
Through its object oriented design, each part of MUI is independently upgradable and can be extended by third parties by straight forward MUI plug-ins libraries that can add almost infinite possibilities to the interface.

Click image to download PDF

Merci pour votre aide à l'agrandissement d'Amigaland.com !


Thanks for you help to extend Amigaland.com !
frdanlenfideelhuitjanoplptroruessvtr

Connexion

Pub+

55.2% 
9.8% 
3.7% 
3.5% 
3% 
2.3% 
2.1% 
1.3% 
1% 
0.9% 

Today: 6
Yesterday: 74
This Week: 170
Last Week: 732
This Month: 2096
Last Month: 2867
Total: 77484

Information cookies

Cookies are short reports that are sent and stored on the hard drive of the user's computer through your browser when it connects to a web. Cookies can be used to collect and store user data while connected to provide you the requested services and sometimes tend not to keep. Cookies can be themselves or others.

There are several types of cookies:

  • Technical cookies that facilitate user navigation and use of the various options or services offered by the web as identify the session, allow access to certain areas, facilitate orders, purchases, filling out forms, registration, security, facilitating functionalities (videos, social networks, etc..).
  • Customization cookies that allow users to access services according to their preferences (language, browser, configuration, etc..).
  • Analytical cookies which allow anonymous analysis of the behavior of web users and allow to measure user activity and develop navigation profiles in order to improve the websites.

So when you access our website, in compliance with Article 22 of Law 34/2002 of the Information Society Services, in the analytical cookies treatment, we have requested your consent to their use. All of this is to improve our services. We use Google Analytics to collect anonymous statistical information such as the number of visitors to our site. Cookies added by Google Analytics are governed by the privacy policies of Google Analytics. If you want you can disable cookies from Google Analytics.

However, please note that you can enable or disable cookies by following the instructions of your browser.

Visitors

Visite depuis
03-10-2004
Visite depuis
23-02-2014